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Pages 1-11

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From page 1...
... describe the curricular supports and professional development opportunities needed by early childhood educators across diverse pre-K settings to enable the effective and equitable implementation of high-quality pre-K curricula; (5) describe funding mechanisms, state and federal policies, and new innovations that 1 This chapter does not include references.
From page 2...
... In working to define a vision for high-quality curriculum that can support equity, the committee recognizes that this is a highly creative, complex endeavor that takes into account multiple demands and requires multiple resources -- factors representing the rich tapestry that undergirds curriculum effectiveness. These factors include the written content of the curriculum itself, including the learning environments in which the curriculum will be delivered; the supports for teachers and their own needs, such as professional learning experiences (including preservice education and ongoing professional development)
From page 3...
... Considering all these many factors, the committee developed the vision for high-quality preschool curricula described in Box S-1. Box S-1 Vision for High-Quality Preschool Curricula The committee's vision for high-quality preschool curricula aims to fulfill the promise of an education that fosters holistic and healthy development and learning for every child, regardless of place or socioeconomic status, and affirms children's full identities, including race, culture, home language, gender, and ability.
From page 4...
... Conclusion 4: Evidence-based preschool curriculum that is well implemented has been shown to help promote equitable outcomes in mathematics, language, literacy, and social emotional skills seen at kindergarten entry, particularly for children living in poverty and Black and Latine children. However, studies have generally not assessed curriculum effects on home language development for multilingual learners.
From page 5...
... Full proficiency in more than one language is associated with cognitive, cultural, social, and economic benefits. However, most states, school districts, and local programs have yet to develop a procedure for accurately identifying preschool multilingual learners, rarely provide dual language instruction, and have few bilingual early childhood educators qualified to support home language development or provide dual language instruction.
From page 6...
... develop and provide adaptations and revisions so that the curricula are culturally and linguistically responsive and foster an anti-bias, anti-racist, multilingual, and inclusive approach in early childhood education. RECOMMENDATION 4: From the outset, curriculum developers, in partnership with researchers and teacher educators, should develop curricula and supporting materials in Spanish, English, and other languages commonly spoken by children with a home language other than English.
From page 7...
... RECOMMENDATION 8: Program leaders and policy makers should ensure that educators receive professional development, regular in-classroom coaching, and access to materials tied to the implementation of evidence-based curricula, including supports for delivering curricula in children's home language alongside English, or for monolingual English-speaking teachers, supporting multilingual learners through cross-linguistic connections and other research-informed practices that bridge languages. Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs
From page 8...
... This includes collaboration between researchers and practitioners, data collection that captures characteristics of the populations being served and the curricula being used in the programs children attend, quality measures that capture the strengths and lived experiences of all children, and professional development and supports for practitioners. Conclusion 14: High turnover rates are prevalent in the field of early education.
From page 9...
... Additional research is needed to guide the development and implementation of culturally and linguistically affirming, anti-bias curricula for preschool programs, as well as to evaluate existing curricula on these dimensions. This includes much-needed Prepublication Copy, Uncorrected Proofs
From page 10...
... RECOMMENDATION 15: To build the necessary evidence base over the next 5–10 years, relevant federal agencies, states, and philanthropies should invest in ongoing research aimed at developing implementation systems to support the transition to evidence-based curricula that are practical and accessible. These investments should: • ensure the representation of Black, Indigenous, Latine, Asian, and Pacific Islander children, multilingual learners, children with disabilities, and children living in poverty in study samples with explicit attention to their unique experiences; • support implementation research that describes and identifies effective practices used by individual educators and programs for delivering and adapting curricula in ways that are culturally and linguistically responsive and relevant for children and families in their programs; • support studies that compare different domain-specific combinations and outcomes beyond those traditionally used, in order to capture new understanding of what the term "whole child" encompasses in a diverse society (i.e., to capture culturally and linguistically affirming and anti-bias practices)
From page 11...
... creating resources to better understand and document study conditions of curriculum effectiveness; (2) standardizing approaches for examining, reporting, and interpreting potential sources of curriculum effect heterogeneity; and (3)


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