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Biographical Memoirs Volume 68 (1995) / Chapter Skim
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Arthur S. King
Pages 181-194

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From page 181...
... Robert Andrew King stucIiecl law anti set up a successful practice in Union, Missouri. He also server!
From page 182...
... A notable event in King's life here, and one that he liked to recall in later years, was a pack trip with a group of Fresno men and boys into the Kings River Canyon. At that time, this was unclisturbed wiTct mountain country, now part of a national park.
From page 183...
... Kayser's Handbuch der Spectroscopy, continually revised, was the primary source of ciata on wavelengths, estimated intensities, ant! identification of the spectral lines of the elements.
From page 184...
... He also felt that one of the main objectives of the observatory should be the undertaking of basic and extended research programs seldom undertaken by university researchers at that time because they depended on continued support over a long period of time and significant results were not expected to be forthcoming in a few months. This policy applied to both astronomical and physical laboratory programs.
From page 185...
... It remained basically unchanged during King's Tong series of spectroscopic observations extending over almost forty years. The heating element of the furnace was an accurately machined graphite tube about one-half inch in diameter inside with an eighth-inch wall thickness.
From page 186...
... Absorption spectra could be observed by placing a graphite plug in the center of the furnace tube or by focusing the beam of light from a source of continuous spectrum such as a tungsten filament at the center of the heated tube, then onto the slit of the spectrograph. The photographic plate homer was mounted on a horizontal track above floor level.
From page 187...
... The countryside, originally semidesert, was beautiful, with the alluvial slopes at the base of the mountains covered with citrus groves interspersed with attractive and prosperous small towns. The lower-lying portions of the river valleys were devoted to alfalfa fields and dairy and vegetable farms.
From page 188...
... These intensity estimates and the temperature classifications proved to be key ingredients in the later-term analyses of the complex spectra of the metals ant! rare earths.
From page 189...
... King to make wavelength measurements, furnace arc, and spark intensity estimates as well as temperature classifications of their spectral lines. These data were basic to the term analysis of these very complex spectra.
From page 190...
... During the :1930s King continued his observations of furnace spectra, particularly of the rare earths; in fact, he did so until his retirement. In 1936 he collaborated with his son, Robert, in developing a method using the graphite tube furnace for the quantitative measurement of the true relative strengths of lines in complex spectra.
From page 192...
... 40:213. The properties in the electric furnace of the banded spectra ascribed to titanium oxide, magnesium hydride, & calcium hydride.
From page 193...
... 68:104. Temperature classification of the stronger lines of columbium, with notes of their hyperfine structure.


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