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Biographical Memoirs Volume 68 (1995) / Chapter Skim
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Edward Holland Spicer
Pages 325-352

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From page 325...
... The elder Spicer was of Quaker persuasion, and in 1908 he took his family to Arclen, Delaware, a single-tax community based on the principles of Henry George. The Spicers fitted nicely into the liberal intellectual atmosphere of Arden, which lay in a setting of fields and woods along Naaman's Creek just north of Wilmington.
From page 326...
... went to New OrIeans to seek employment as merchant sailors. Ned found a job as an ordinary seaman on a ship called the Aquarius, which carried him to Germany.
From page 327...
... At the time of Spicer's enrollment, Johns Hopkins was experimenting with what its administrators called the "New Plan" uncler which a student couJid take graduate courses without first earning a baccalaureate degree. Ned chose some of the more acivance(1 classes, including one for which he wrote a paper titled "Theory of Hours and Production," which he react at a graduate seminar.
From page 328...
... Greatly stimulated by his new surroundings, Ned resolved to maintain himself and sought employment wherever he could find it. He washed windows at a resort hotel in Phoenix, picked oranges, and worked at an agricultural inspection station.
From page 329...
... After receiving his master's degree in the spring of 1933, Ned headed for northern Arizona to take part in an archeology project that resulted in the partial excavation of Tuzigoot Ruin, now a national monument. Associated with Spicer at Tuzigoot were Louis R
From page 330...
... The long study hours and the cold Lake Michigan winter took their toll on Ned, who, early in the spring, suffered a hemorrhage that required hospitalization. Cole and other members of the department, aware of Ned's precarious financial situation, arranged for payment of his medical bills.
From page 331...
... They spent their honeymoon at the Yaqui village of Pascua in northwest Tucson, which would be their residence for the next year and where they would concluct a community study. They then returned to Chicago, en c!
From page 332...
... In 1943 Nec] became head of the Community Analysis Section of the War Relocation Authority (WRA)
From page 333...
... The University of Chicago had published his revised dissertation in 1940 under the title Pascua: A Yaqui Village in Arizona, and the book received favorable notice from colleagues throughout the country. He also contributed along with Fay-Cooper Cole, Fred Eggan, and Henry Hoijer to the preface for Grenville Goodwin's classic work Social Organization of the Western Apache, which became available in 1942.
From page 334...
... Aciclitionally, he completecI research for a major book concerned with the impact of European civilization on the Indian population of northwest Mexico and the southwestern part of the United States. He also expanded his professional relationships through service from 1951 through 1953 on the Board of Directors of the American Anthropological Association.
From page 335...
... describe culture change in six Indian tribes, irir~ntiEv nerinH.~ when particular change factors prevailed, ^~ J rim rim and characterize the strategies employecl by the agents of change as well as those used by tribes in responding to change. From this collaboration came the book Perspectives in American Indian Culture Change, published in 1961.
From page 336...
... A National Science Foundation senior fellowship enablecl him to clo a comparative stucly of programs for Inclian better
From page 337...
... an invitation from William S King, an official of the Bureau of Indian Affairs en cl former student of his, to help plan, and take part in, a series of regional community development seminars for BTA personnel.
From page 338...
... stepped clown from the presidency of the American Anthropological Association in the fall of 1974, he was honoree! with membership in the American Philosophical Society ant!
From page 339...
... During his recuperation, he returned to work on the "enduring people" manuscript, and in the fall of 1979 the American Anthropological Association presented him its Distinguished Service Award. Shortly afterward, the Southwestern Anthropological Association honoree!
From page 340...
... In the fall of 1985 Spicer's colleagues and students organized an all-day tribute to him at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Washington, D.C. Speaker after speaker extolled the depth and breadth of Ned's interests, his contributions to anthropology and to humankind, his inspirational teaching, and, above all, his remarkable qualities of love and understanding.
From page 341...
... Paper delivered at the 84th annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Washington, D.C.
From page 342...
... Spicer. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.
From page 343...
... Museum Notes (Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff)
From page 344...
... Impounded People: Japanese Americans in the Relocation Centers. Final report of the Community Analysis Section of the War Relocation Authority.
From page 345...
... American Anthropological Association, Memoir No.
From page 346...
... Some Foundations for publication Policy. Washington, D.C.: American Anthropological Association.
From page 347...
... The history of federal Indian policy in relation to the development of Indian communities. In Report and Recommendations, Community Development Seminar, Chinle Agency.
From page 348...
... Washington, D.C.: American Anthropological Asso.
From page 349...
... Washington, D.C.: American Anthropological Association. 1980 The Fort Lowell Historac Distr~ct.
From page 350...
... In Handbook of North American Indians, vol 4, History of Indian-White Relations, ed.


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