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2 Surface Platform Technology
Pages 13-36

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From page 13...
... It is anticipated that the technologies described in this report, such as advanced hull forms, integrated electric power and propulsion systems, stealth, and automation, will be applicable to all surface platforms envisioned for the early part of the 21st century. The panel anticipates the following platform types: · The aircraft carrier of this era will continue to fulfill the missions of deterrence and sustainable strike combat power.
From page 14...
... a smaller, dedicated platform to support Marine Corps concepts such as Sea Dragon. The following are the technology focus areas for major efforts with respect to surface platforms: Minimal manning through automation, Integrated electric power and propulsion systems, Signature reduction, Modular design, Environmental control, Aircraft catapults, and Indigenous self-defense.
From page 15...
... At the tactical systems level, the concept of distributed intelligent control with modular software and the use of standard interface structures is being adopted. The reliance on relatively disparate proprietary approaches is giving way to systems that employ commercially available hardware and software with standard interfaces and open architectures.
From page 16...
... in the system, the ability of each intelligent node to communicate directly to any other node on the control network as required, and as a result, transparent access to information and control at the component level or any other desired level. Software changes can be made at individual nodes, thus avoiding disruptive changes common to monolithic software architectures.
From page 17...
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From page 18...
... As a consequence, ships will be designed with more attention to their offensive missions and survivability, while attention given to the crew will be focused more on providing greater functionality, survivability, and comfort than are currently possible. Damage Control Ship survivability can be enhanced through the use of integrated intelligent sensing and action systems for rapidly and automatically detecting, characterizing, and controlling fire, flooding, and structural damage.
From page 19...
... Integrated Electric Power and Propulsion System Objective The objective is to capitalize on advances in permanent magnet material technology and in power electronics that are making alternatives available for power generation and distribution for ship propulsion, weapons, and auxiliary systems. Practical demonstration at sea of electric drive with an integrated power system is required in order to develop the mature technology that could be delivered to the fleet.
From page 20...
... The Navy could then reap the advantages of improved performance with improved affordability. Enabling Technology The combination of advanced permanent magnet materials and power electronics enables affordable, high-performance, electric drive ship propulsion with a fully integrated power system.
From page 21...
... Even with redundant power sources for reliability, the advantage lies with electric drive, because redundant ship service and redundant propulsion power systems would become one set of redundant integrated power systems. Increased Payload The combination of the power density and arrangement flexibility attributes of electric drive translates into increased payload availability (or conversely, smaller overall ship size for a given payload)
From page 22...
... The technologies are as follows: · Composite materials, · Magnetic signature reduction, · Drag reduction, and · Alternative hull forms. These fundamental technologies and the benefits that will accrue in reducing the signatures and increasing the survivability of future naval platforms are described below.
From page 23...
... Current technical challenges preventing the introduction of composite materials into the next generation of naval surface platforms are fire tolerance, toxicity, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) and electromagnetic pulse (EMP)
From page 24...
... Benefits Utilization of composite material as topside, including deckhouse, stack and mast, and hull structure, in naval surface platforms will enable a reduction in platform signature several magnitudes greater than currently possible for a surface combatant with the traditional steel and/or aluminum material as its primary structure. Composite materials will enable multifunctional sensors and emitters to be embedded and conformal.
From page 25...
... Advanced Hull Forms Objective Apply advanced hull form shaping above and below the waterline to provide signature reduction and, where possible, also obtain measurable improvements in seakeeping, speed, and endurance. These improvements along with signature reduction can directly improve the militarily important areas of mission effectiveness, survivability, affordability, and operational availability.
From page 26...
... Modern computer technology, coupled with advanced CFD algorithms, makes the assessment of hull form optimization possible. Hull forms capable of reasonably high speeds can be developed that minimize the downside impacts of high fuel consumption, poor seakeeping, large wake signatures, or the application of sophisticated systems historically associated with surface effect ships.
From page 27...
... Enabling Technologies Boundary layer control, transition and turbulence control via electromagnetic force application, and other active drag reduction techniques have the potential to enable a significant improvement in drag for both surface and undersea vessels, but the phenomenology is not well understood and, in some cases, not consistently repeatable (in the case of electromagnetic turbulence control, for example)
From page 28...
... Modular Design Objective Future system architectures enable concepts of modular design to be reconsidered in order to achieve both flexibility in upgrading existing combat systems or in installing new systems over the life of a naval ship and a significant reduction in building time and cost. Enabling Technology The architecture of future technologies such as CLIDCS, integrated power systems, open architecture networked combat systems, PEBBs, and multifunctional antennas warrants and enables addressing modularity in ship design and construction.
From page 29...
... A limiting factor is the current hard-wiring of systems that are customized for the particular sensors, consoles, computers, and launchers of a specific weapon system. Networking technology will enable the designer to replace the hardwired system with data buses and standard interfaces that will carry all of the information used by the combat system.
From page 30...
... The Navy is beginning to apply data buses to the latter functions. It is conceivable that the boundary between combat and ship systems will become blurred and that a common bus will serve all functions, as well as integrated power systems.
From page 31...
... Future shipboard waste treatment systems could consist of an array of separate systems for specific classes of waste, or there could be a single, large-scale waste treatment system that potentially would handle nearly all types of waste streams generated on board naval vessels. The Navy's objective is to develop and field systems that properly treat shipboard waste without hampering a vessel's fundamental military mission, whether during peacetime or war, and minimize this impact on the limited space and power available on board.
From page 32...
... Plasma arc pyrolysis has many potential advantages for waste treatment in general. The slag formed after waste pyrolysis is inert and of relatively low volume; it can be extracted readily from the system.
From page 33...
... Aircraft Catapults Objective Replace the steam catapult in order to gain flexibility in the choice of main propulsion plants and achieve significant savings in the space and weight of the catapult system. Enabling Technology Currently, research is being conducted on two alternative catapult systems: an electromagnetic system and one powered by an internal combustion engine.
From page 34...
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From page 35...
... Composite development will be a key part of signature reduction efforts, along with advanced hull forms and flow control. In addition, flow control, if successfully pursued, will offer many benefits from increased range for a given speed to smaller ships for a given endurance.
From page 36...
... NAVY AND MARINE CORPS · VOLUME 6 3. Composite materials offer opportunities for heterogeneous fabrication that supports new possibilities for signature reduction.


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