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4 Facility Design with a Carbon Filter System
Pages 31-39

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From page 31...
... GAS CONDITIONING Flue gas emitted from the normal baseline system is saturated with water vapor, but high humidity can undermine the adsorption of a carbon bed by filling up 31 the pores in the carbon particles with condensed water. The extent to which the relative humidity of the gas must be reduced in order to prevent this depends on the gas temperature (e.g., 80 percent relative humidity would be satisfactory at 170F [77C]
From page 32...
... 32 nodal =' _ ~' - - - _ _ _ _ _ ~ ~ A' o U~< o 0~= .
From page 33...
... The lower operating temperature of the scrubber could also result in the removal of more acid gases from the gas stream, although the magnitude of the amount has not been evaluated. The gas leaving the mist eliminators would be at 100 percent relative humidity (i.e., saturated with 33 water vapor at 125F [52C]
From page 34...
... Because of lower relative humidity, the emitted gases in Alternative 1 would also be less likely to create a visible plume from the stacks In the normal baseline system, the alkaline liquid in the scrubbing tower liquid (and the liquid in the quench tower) have to be controlled for pH and salt content.
From page 35...
... Summary of Gas Conditioning The Alternative 1 design with gas cooling in a packed bed appears to offer several advantages over Alternative 2. The principal advantage would be the lower operating temperature of the carbon bed, which would enable the bed to do a better job of meeting its design objective of reducing concentrations of SOPCs in the flue gas that would otherwise escape to the air.
From page 36...
... Other features of this design that appeared to be useful are listed below: The design has three sets of carbon beds in parallel, with each set consisting of two 12-inch thick beds in series, separated by a small plenum. Sampling and analysis of the gas flow between beds in series should provide advanced warning if they are approaching saturation and require changing.
From page 37...
... _ 37 009 ORB 09A 009 The gas flow velocity through the carbon bed is low, less than one foot per second, and the bed has a large heat capacity. Consequently, if a hot spot or fire were to develop, it would probably develop slowly, allowing ample reaction time.
From page 38...
... Because agent levels in remote processing areas can be relatively high, and because the air from these areas is filtered through the ventilation air carbon beds, these filters are exposed to much higher levels of agent than the flue gas carbon filters will be. The committee believes the disposal process should be the same, or very similar, for both sets of filters.
From page 39...
... Even though no final design was available from the Army, the committee 39 (my) Natural gas V: Vie Double block valve believes a safe and efficient design that incorporates early detection of "hot spots" or a fire in the carbon bed and rapid shutdown and isolation of the filter is feasible.


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