National Academies Press: OpenBook
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
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Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel

Committee on Review and Evaluation of International Technologies for the Destruction of Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel

Board on Army Science and Technology

Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

Washington, D.C.
www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

500 FIFTH STREET, N.W. Washington, DC 20001

NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance.

This study was supported by Contract No. W911NF-05-C-0078 between the National Academy of Sciences and the Department of Defense. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the project.

International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-10203-0

International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-10203-2

Cover: Images courtesy of the public affairs office of the Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Project, U.S. Army, Chemical Materials Agency. The munitions shown illustrate the condition in which such items are often found when they are recovered from munitions burial sites.

Limited copies of this report are available from:

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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
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THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Adivers to the Nation on Science, Engineering, and Medicine


The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences.


The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Wm. A. Wulf is president of the National Academy of Engineering.


The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg is president of the Institute of Medicine.


The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone and Dr. Wm. A. Wulf are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council.

www.national-academies.org

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
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COMMITTEE ON REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF NON-STOCKPILE CHEMICAL MATERIEL

RICHARD J. AYEN, Chair,

Waste Management, Inc. (retired), Jamestown, Rhode Island

ROBIN L. AUTENRIETH,

Texas A&M University, College Station

ADRIENNE T. COOPER,

Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

MARTIN GOLLIN,

St. Davids, Pennsylvania

GARY S. GROENEWOLD,

Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls

PAUL F. KAVANAUGH, BG, U.S. Army (retired),

Fairfax, Virginia

TODD A. KIMMELL,

Argonne National Laboratory, Washington, D.C.

LOREN D. KOLLER,

Oregon State University (retired), Corvallis

DOUGLAS M. MEDVILLE, MITRE

Corporation (retired), Reston, Virginia

GEORGE W. PARSHALL, E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Company (retired),

Wilmington, Delaware

JAMES P. PASTORICK,

Geophex UXO, Ltd., Alexandria, Virginia

LEONARD M. SIEGEL,

Center for Public Environmental Oversight, Mountain View, California

WILLIAM J. WALSH,

Pepper Hamilton LLP, Washington, D.C.

Staff

HARRISON T. PANNELLA, Study Director

JAMES C. MYSKA, Senior Research Associate

ALEXANDER R. REPACE, Senior Program Assistant (from March 2006)

LaTANYA CLEMENCIA, Senior Program Assistant (until March 2006)

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
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BOARD ON ARMY SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

MALCOLM R. O’NEILL, Chair,

Lockheed Martin Corporation (retired), Vienna, Virginia

HENRY J. HATCH, Vice Chair,

Army Chief of Engineers (retired), Oakton, Virginia

RAJ AGGARWAL,

Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

SETH BONDER,

The Bonder Group, Ann Arbor, Michigan

NORVAL L. BROOME,

MITRE Corporation (retired), Suffolk, Virginia

JAMES CARAFANO,

The Heritage Foundation, Washington, D.C.

ROBERT L. CATTOI,

Rockwell International Corporation (retired), Dallas, Texas

DARRELL W. COLLIER,

U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command (retired), Leander, Texas

ALAN H. EPSTEIN,

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge

ROBERT R. EVERETT,

MITRE Corporation (retired), New Seabury, Massachusetts

WILLIAM R. GRAHAM,

National Security Research, Inc., Arlington, Virginia

PETER F. GREEN,

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

CARL GUERRERI,

Electronic Warfare Associates, Inc., Herndon, Virginia

M. FREDERICK HAWTHORNE,

University of California, Los Angeles

CLARENCE W. KITCHENS,

Science Applications International Corporation, Vienna, Virginia

LARRY LEHOWICZ,

Quantum Research International, Arlington, Virginia

JOHN W. LYONS, U.S.

Army Research Laboratory (retired), Ellicott City, Maryland

EDWARD K. REEDY,

Georgia Tech Research Institute (retired), Atlanta

DENNIS J. REIMER,

DFI International, Washington, D.C.

WALTER D. SINCOSKIE,

Telcordia Technologies, Inc., Morristown, New Jersey

JUDITH L. SWAIN,

University of California, San Diego

WILLIAM R. SWARTOUT,

Institute for Creative Technologies, Marina del Rey, California

EDWIN L. THOMAS,

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge

BARRY M. TROST,

Stanford University, Stanford, California

Staff

BRUCE A. BRAUN, Director

DETRA BODRICK-SHORTER, Administrative Coordinator

CHRIS JONES, Financial Associate

DEANNA P. SPARGER, Program Administrative Coordinator

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
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Preface

The Committee on Review and Evaluation of International Technologies for the Destruction of Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel was appointed by the National Research Council (NRC) in response to a request by the U.S. Army’s Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel.

The committee’s focus was on destruction technologies for recovered chemical weapons that are not now a part of the repertoire of the Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel but that could prove to be useful additions or replacements. To that end, countries using or considering the use of technologies for the destruction of old and abandoned chemical weapons to meet requirements of the international Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) treaty, along with the developers of such technologies, were contacted. This report summarizes the acquired information, evaluates the technologies to the extent possible, and presents the results. Consideration was given to technologies that might offer advantages over those now in use by the U.S. Army or those that might otherwise prove useful, especially for situations not now adequately covered, such as destruction operations where large numbers of recovered munitions must be treated. A limited effort was expended on the assessment and storage of recovered chemical weapons.

Several individuals met with visiting committee members in Europe and provided helpful information on the status of international technologies in other countries. The committee offers its thanks for their assistance:

  • Richard Soilleux, Technical Leader, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, U.K. Ministry of Defence, Porton Down, England;

  • Hans-Joachim Grimsel, Managing Director, Gesellschaft zur Entsorgung von chemischen Kampfstoffe und Rüstungs-Altlasten (GEKA), Munster, Germany;

  • Ralf Trapp, Senior Planning Officer, Office of the Deputy Director-General, Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, The Hague, The Netherlands;

  • Jerzy Mazur, Head, Chemical Demilitarisation Branch (CDB), Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, The Hague, Netherlands;

  • Jeff Osborne, Senior Substantive Officer, CDB, Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, The Hague, Netherlands;

  • Herbert De Bischopp, Professor, Royal Military Academy, Brussels, Belgium; and

  • Michel Lefebvre, Professor, Royal Military Academy, Brussels, Belgium.

The committee would also like to thank vendor representatives and others who assisted in information gathering for this report. See Appendix D for the names of these individuals.

The study was conducted under the auspices of the NRC’s Board on Army Science and Technology (BAST). The BAST was established in 1982 as a unit of the National Research Council at the request of the U.S. Army. The BAST brings to bear broad military, industrial, and academic scientific, engineering, and management expertise on Army technical challenges and other issues of importance to senior Army leaders. The board discusses potential studies of interest; develops and frames study tasks; ensures proper project planning; suggests potential committee members and reviewers for reports produced by fully independent ad hoc study committees; and convenes meetings to examine strategic issues. The board members listed on p. vi were not asked to endorse the committee’s conclusions or recommendations, nor did they review the final draft of this report before its release. However, board members with appropriate expertise may be nominated to serve as formal members of study committees, or as report reviewers.

The chair acknowledges the superb support of the BAST director, Bruce A. Braun, and the study director, Harrison T. Pannella. Valuable assistance was provided by James C. Myska, Alexander R. Repace, and LaTanya Clemencia

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of the NRC staff. In view of the international nature of the necessary information gathering, committee members were faced with considerably more challenges than is typical for a National Research Council study in the area of chemical demilitarization, and the chair is grateful for their hard work and diligence in carrying out this study.

Richard J. Ayen, Chair

Committee on Review and Evaluation of International Technologies for the Destruction of Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
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Acknowledgment of Reviewers

This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this report:

William B. Bacon, Shaw Environmental & Infrastructure,

Ruth M. Doherty, Naval Surface Warfare Center,

Gene Dyer, consultant,

Jeff Edson, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment,

Mario H. Fontana, University of Tennessee (Knoxville),

Dan Luss, University of Houston,

James F. Mathis, Exxon Corporation (retired),

Hyla S. Napadensky, Napadensky Energetics Inc.,

William R. Rhyne, ABS Consulting, Inc. (retired), and

William Tumas, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations, nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Richard A. Conway, Union Carbide Corporation (retired). Appointed by the National Research Council, he was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
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3

 

EVALUATION FACTORS FOR INTERNATIONAL DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

 

22

   

 Selection of Evaluation Factors,

 

22

   

 Description of Evaluation Factors,

 

23

   

 Process Maturity,

 

23

   

 Process Efficacy/Throughput,

 

23

   

 Process Safety,

 

24

   

 Public and Regulatory Acceptability in a U.S. Context,

 

25

   

 Secondary Waste Issues,

 

25

   

 Process Costs,

 

26

   

 Rating System,

 

26

   

 Assessment of Evaluation Factors Against Directives Reflected in the Statement of Task,

 

28

   

 References,

 

28

4

 

TIER 1 INTERNATIONAL MUNITIONS PROCESSING TECHNOLOGIES

 

29

   

 Introduction,

 

29

   

 Measurement of Performance for Detonation Technologies,

 

29

   

 Controlled Detonation Chamber Technology,

 

30

   

 Description,

 

30

   

 Country-by-Country Experience,

 

33

   

 Evaluation Factors Analysis for CDC,

 

33

   

 Summary,

 

35

   

 Detonation of Ammunition in Vacuum Integrated Chamber,

 

36

   

 Description,

 

36

   

 Country-by-Country Experience,

 

39

   

 Evaluation Factors Analysis,

 

39

   

 Summary,

 

42

   

 Dynasafe Technology,

 

43

   

 Description,

 

43

   

 Country-by-Country Experience,

 

45

   

 Evaluation Factors Analysis,

 

45

   

 Summary,

 

49

   

 Comparative Evaluations of Tier 1 Munitions Processing Technologies,

 

49

   

 Findings and Recommendations,

 

52

   

 References,

 

53

5

 

TIER I INTERNATIONAL AGENT-ONLY PROCESSING TECHNOLOGIES

 

54

   

 Introduction,

 

54

   

 Use of Neutralization and Hydrolysis in the Rest of the World,

 

54

   

 Russian Two-Stage Process: Neutralization with Addition of Bitumen,

 

56

   

 Description,

 

56

   

 Country-by-Country Experience,

 

59

   

 Evaluation Factors Analysis,

 

59

   

 Incineration,

 

60

   

 Description,

 

60

   

 Country-by-Country Experience,

 

60

   

 Evaluation Factors Analysis,

 

62

   

 Comparative Evaluations of Tier 1 Agent-Only Processing Technologies,

 

64

   

 Findings and Recommendations,

 

66

   

 References,

 

66

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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
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Tables and Figures

TABLES

ES-1

 

Evaluation Factor Rating Comparison of Tier 1 Munitions Processing Technologies with U.S. EDS,

 

3

ES-2

 

Specific Engineering Parameters for Existing Munitions Processing Technologies,

 

4

1-1

 

Examples of Known or Potential Large Sites of Buried CWM Identified by the U.S. Army,

 

12

1-2

 

Agent Neutralization Parameters for the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant,

 

16

3-1

 

Process Maturity Subfactors,

 

23

3-2

 

Process Efficacy/Throughput Subfactors,

 

24

3-3

 

Process Safety Subfactors,

 

25

3-4

 

Public and Regulatory Acceptability in a U.S. Context Subfactors,

 

26

3-5

 

Secondary Waste Issues Subfactors,

 

27

3-6

 

Statement of Task Directives and Corresponding Technology Evaluation Factors,

 

28

4-1

 

Dimensions of the Pressure Chambers in Three CDC Models Designed for Destroying Chemical Warfare Agents,

 

32

4-2

 

Estimated Throughput Rates for CDC TC-60,

 

34

4-3

 

DAVINCH Experience in Destroying Japanese WW II-Era Bombs Containing Lewisite, Mustard Agent, and Agents Clark I and Clark II (Vomiting Agents),

 

39

4-4

 

Estimated DAVINCH DV65 Throughput Rates,

 

41

4-5

 

Agent Quantities Destroyed per DAVINCH DV65 Cycle,

 

41

4-6

 

Size Specifications for Two Dynasafe Static Kiln Models,

 

43

4-7

 

Estimated Dynasafe SK2000 Throughput Rates,

 

47

4-8

 

Agent Quantities Destroyed per Dynasafe SK2000 Cycle,

 

47

4-9

 

Evaluation Factor Rating Comparison of Tier 1 Munitions Processing Technologies with U.S. EDS,

 

50

4-10

 

Specific Engineering Parameters for Existing Munitions Processing Technologies,

 

51

4-11

 

Estimated Daily Throughput Rates for Three Detonation Technologies (10-hr day),

 

51

5-1

 

Destruction of Chemical Agents, 1958-1993,

 

63

5-2

 

Tooele Chemical Agent Disposal Facility Waste Streams,

 

65

5-3

 

Evaluation Factor Rating Comparison of Tier 1 Agent-Only Processing Technologies with U.S. RRS/SCANS,

 

65

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
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6-1

 

Energetic Materials and Chemical Warfare Fills Treatable by the Acid Digestion Process,

 

69

A-1

 

Inventory of Non-Stockpile Items at the Pine Bluff Arsenal,

 

86

A-2

 

Inventory of Non-Stockpile Items at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) and Deseret Chemical Depot (DCD), Utah,

 

87

A-3

 

Inventory of Non-Stockpile Items at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland,

 

87

A-4

 

Inventory of Non-Stockpile Items at Anniston Chemical Activity, Alabama,

 

87

B-1

 

Process Maturity Subfactor Evaluations for Tier 1 Munitions Processing Technologies,

 

90

B-2

 

Process Efficacy/Throughput Subfactor Evaluations for Tier 1 Munitions Processing Technologies,

 

91

B-3

 

Process Safety Subfactor Evaluations for Tier 1 Munitions Processing Technologies,

 

93

B-4

 

Public and Regulatory Acceptability in a U.S. Context Subfactor Evaluations for Tier 1 Munitions Processing Technologies,

 

94

B-5

 

Secondary Waste Issues Subfactor Evaluations for Tier 1 Munitions Processing Technologies,

 

96

C-1

 

Process Maturity Subfactor Evaluations for Tier 1 Agent-Only Processing Technologies,

 

100

C-2

 

Process Efficacy/Throughput Subfactor Evaluations for Tier 1 Agent-Only Processing Technologies,

 

101

C-3

 

Process Safety Subfactor Evaluations for Tier 1 Agent-Only Processing Technologies,

 

102

C-4

 

Public and Regulatory Acceptability Subfactor Evaluations for Tier 1 Agent-Only Processing Technologies,

 

103

C-5

 

Secondary Waste Issues Subfactor Evaluations for Tier 1 Agent-Only Processing Technologies,

 

104

FIGURES

1-1

 

Diagram of EDS-2,

 

13

1-2

 

Diagram of RRS operations trailer,

 

14

1-3

 

Photograph of SCANS,

 

15

4-1

 

TC-25 CDC system layout,

 

32

4-2

 

DAVINCH three-stage destruction mechanism,

 

37

4-3

 

Outline of the Kanda project,

 

37

4-4

 

Dynasafe static destruction kiln process flow,

 

44

5-1

 

Reaction of Russian VX and potassium isobutylate,

 

57

5-2

 

Reaction of VX and potassium isobutylate,

 

57

5-3

 

Notional reaction scheme for the addition of G-type agent to aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA),

 

58

5-4

 

Block diagram of U.S. baseline incineration system,

 

61

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2006. Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11777.
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Acronyms

ACWA Assembled Chemical Weapons Assessment/Alternatives

ADP acid digestion process

AEL airborne exposure limit

ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers

CAA Clean Air Act

CAIS chemical agent identification set(s)

CAMDS Chemical Agent Munitions Disposal System

CATOX catalytic oxidation (unit)

CDC controlled detonation chamber

CEB Centre d’Etudes du Bouchet

CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act

CFR Code of Federal Regulations

CG phosgene

CK cyanogen chloride

CO carbon monoxide

CS orthochlorobenzylidene malononitrile (tear gas)

CWC Chemical Weapons Convention

CWM chemical warfare materiel

DA diphenylchloroarsine (Clark I)

DAVINCH detonation of ammunition in vacuum integrated chamber

DC diphenylcyanoarsine (Clark II)

DCD Deseret Chemical Depot

DE destruction efficiency

DF a binary precursor (methylphosphonic difluoride)

DFS deactivation furnace system

DM adamsite

DOD Department of Defense

DOE Department of Energy

DOT Department of Transportation

DPG Dugway Proving Ground

DRE destruction and removal efficiency

DRES Defence Research Establishment Suffield

DSTL Defence Science and Technology Laboratory

DUN dunnage furnace

EDS explosive destruction system

EPA Environmental Protection Agency

ESTCP Environmental Security Technology Certification Program

GA a nerve agent (tabun)

GB a nerve agent (sarin)

GD a nerve agent (soman)

GEKA German testing facility, Gesellschaft zur Entsorgung von chemischen Kampfstoffe und Rüstungs-Altlasten

GPL general population limit

H sulfur mustard

HCl hydrogen chloride

HD sulfur mustard (distilled)

HEPA high efficiency particulate air

HMX an explosive

HN nitrogen mustard

HS sulfur mustard

HT sulfur mustard, T-mustard combination

HVAC heating, ventilation, and air conditioning

ICV In-Container Vitrification

IDLH immediately dangerous to life and health

IUPAC International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry

L lewisite or liter

LIC liquid incinerator

LITANS large item transportable access and neutralization system

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MEC munitions and explosives of concern mg milligram

MPF metal parts furnace

NaOH sodium hydroxide

NEPA National Environmental Policy Act nm nanometer

NRC National Research Council

NSCMP Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Project

NSCWM Non-Stockpile Chemical Warfare Materiel

OPCW Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons

PBA Pine Bluff Arsenal

PCB polychlorinated biphenyl

PD phenyldichloroarsine

PINS portable isotopic neutron spectroscopy

PMNSCM Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel

PPE personal protective equipment

RAP regulatory approval and permitting

RCRA Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

RCWM recovered chemical warfare materiel

RDX an explosive

RMA Rocky Mountain Arsenal

ROD record of decision

RRS Rapid Response System

SCANS single CAIS accessing and neutralization system

SERDP Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program

SIPRI Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

SNPE Société Nationale des Poudres et Explosifs

SOT statement of task

STEL short-term exposure limit

TNT an explosive

TPA triphenylarsine

TSDF treatment, storage, and disposal facility

UV ultraviolet

VR Russian version of VX

VX a nerve agent

3X level of agent decontamination (suitable for transport for further processing)

5X level of agent decontamination (suitable for commercial release)

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 Review of International Technologies for Destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel
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The Chemical Weapons Convention requires, among other things, that the signatories to the convention—which includes the United States—destroy by April 29, 2007, or as soon possible thereafter, any chemical warfare materiel that has been recovered from sites where it has been buried once discovered. For several years the United States and several other countries have been developing and using technologies to dispose of this non-stockpile materiel. To determine whether international efforts have resulted in technologies that would benefit the U.S. program, the U.S. Army asked the NRC to evaluate and compare such technologies to those now used by the United States. This book presents a discussion of factors used in the evaluations, summaries of evaluations of several promising international technologies for processing munitions and for agent-only processing, and summaries of other technologies that are less likely to be of benefit to the U.S. program at this time.

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