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Measuring Progress in Obesity Prevention: Workshop Report (2012)

Chapter: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Measuring Progress in Obesity Prevention: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13287.
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A

Workshop Agenda

WORKSHOP ON MEASUREMENT STRATEGIES FOR ACCELERATING PROGRESS IN OBESITY PREVENTION

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies 100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA March 23-24, 2011

PURPOSE

(1) Explore and understand the ways that measurement techniques, strategies, and data sources can impede and/or promote acceleration of progress toward prevention of obesity.

 

(2) Understand what additional knowledge regarding assessments of environments and policies is needed to measure progress in obesity prevention.


          DAY 1: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23
   
12:00 pm Welcome and Opening Remarks
William Purcell,* Harvard University
   
12:15 PANEL I: The Physical Activity, Inactivity, and Built Environments: Current and Potential Sources of Measures for Assessing Progress in Obesity Prevention

Moderator: Bill Kohl,* University of Texas School of Public Health and University of Texas, Austin

Speakers:
James F. Sallis, San Diego State University Christine Hoehner, Washington University

________________

*Member of the IOM Committee on Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Measuring Progress in Obesity Prevention: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13287.
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1:30 PANEL II: The Food and Nutrition Environments: Current and Potential Sources of Measures for Assessing Progress in Obesity Prevention

Moderator: Steven H. Kelder,* University of Texas School of Public Health-Austin

Speakers:
Karen Glanz, University of Pennsylvania
Susan M. Krebs-Smith, National Cancer Institute

   
2:45 BREAK
   
3:00 PANEL III: Cross-Cutting Issues: Current and Potential Sources of Measures for Assessing Progress in Obesity Prevention

Moderator: Patricia B. Crawford,* University of California, Berkeley

Speakers:

Robert M. Malina, University of Texas, Austin, and Tarleton State University

Robin McKinnon, National Cancer Institute

Roland Sturm, RAND

   
4:30 ADJOURN
   

          DAY 2: THURSDAY, MARCH 24
   
8:30 am Welcome and Recap of Day 1
William Purcell,* Harvard University
   
8:45 PANEL IV: Marketing and Industry Measures and Evaluations
Moderator: Ellen Wartella,* Northwestern University
Speakers:

Victoria Rideout,* VJR Consulting

Shu Wen Ng, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

(via web)

Robert C. Hornik, University of Pennsylvania (via web)

   
10:15 BREAK
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Measuring Progress in Obesity Prevention: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13287.
×
   
10:30 PANEL V: State and Community Reach

Moderator: Eduardo J. Sanchez,* Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas

Speakers:

Maya Rockeymoore, Global Policy Solutions and Leadership for Healthy Communities

Laura Kettel Khan, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Amy A. Eyler, Washington University (via web)

Jamie Chriqui,* University of Illinois, Chicago

Brian Cole, University of California, Los Angeles

   
12:45 pm LUNCH
   
1:45 PANEL VI: Disparities and Measurement
Moderator: Shiriki Kumanyika,* University of Pennsylvania
Speakers:

Sarah Samuels, Samuels & Associates

Carlos J. Crespo, Portland State University

Sonya Grier, American University

   
3:30 BREAK
   
3:40 CLOSING SESSION: Themes of the Workshop and Next Steps
Speaker:

Robin McKinnon, National Cancer Institute

   
4:00 ADJOURN
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Measuring Progress in Obesity Prevention: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13287.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Measuring Progress in Obesity Prevention: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13287.
×
Page 119
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Measuring Progress in Obesity Prevention: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13287.
×
Page 120
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Measuring Progress in Obesity Prevention: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13287.
×
Page 121
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Measuring Progress in Obesity Prevention: Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13287.
×
Page 122
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Nearly 69 percent of U.S. adults and 32 percent of children are either overweight or obese, creating an annual medical cost burden that may reach $147 billion. Researchers and policy makers are eager to identify improved measures of environmental and policy factors that contribute to obesity prevention. The IOM formed the Committee on Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention to review the IOM's past obesity-related recommendations, identify a set of recommendations for future action, and recommend indicators of progress in implementing these actions. The committee held a workshop in March 2011 about how to improve measurement of progress in obesity prevention.

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