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Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth (2012)

Chapter: Appendix A: Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13483.
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Appendix A


Agenda

Committee on Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth
November 15-16, 2011
The Keck Center
500 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001

Meeting Goals

• To gather information about the relationship between fitness measures and health outcomes

• To learn lessons from implementation of fitness batteries in the field in the United States and other countries

Tuesday, November 15, 2011: Day 1

1:00 PM Welcome and Introductions
Russell Pate, Committee Chair

SESSION 1: ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH MEASURING FITNESS IN YOUTH

Objective: To develop a shared understanding of specific issues and considerations related to fitness components and the interpretation of test performance results.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13483.
×
 
  Moderator: Russell Pate
1:10 Associations Between Strength and Flexibility and Health
Sharon Plowman, Northern Illinois University
 
1:40 Fitness Measures and Metabolic Health
Lars Anderson, University of Southern Denmark (by phone)
 
2:10 Body Composition: Methods and Its Use in a Fitness Test
Tim Lohman, University of Arizona
 
2:40 Setting Cut-Points: Approaches and Issues
Greg Welk, Iowa State University
 
3:10 Discussion
 
3:40 Break

SESSION 2: CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE FIELD-BASED APPLICATION OF FITNESS MEASURES

Objective: To achieve greater awareness of the issues and considerations associated with developing, implementing, and evaluating a fitness test battery based on the experiences of those working with test batteries that are currently being used around the world.

 
  Moderator: Russell Pate
3:50 Implementation of Fitness Batteries in Various Countries U.S. Fitnessgram
Greg Welk, Iowa State University
 
  EUROFIT
Colin Boreham, University College Dublin
Mark Tremblay, University of Ottawa, Canada
 
4:35 Panel Discussion
 
5:30 Experiences in Implementing Fitness Testing in Urban School Settings
Lori Benson, YMCA of Greater New York
 
6:00 Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13483.
×

Wednesda November 16 2011: Da 2

1:00 PM Welcome and Introductions
Russell Pate, Committee Chair

SESSION 3: FITNESS, BRAIN FUNCTION, AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

1:10 Fitness and Brain Function
Charles H. Hillman,
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
 
1:30 Fitness and Academic Achievement
Joseph Donnelly, University of Kansas
 
1:50 Questions and Answers
 
2:00 Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13483.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13483.
×
Page 239
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13483.
×
Page 240
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13483.
×
Page 241
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13483.
×
Page 242
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Physical fitness affects our ability to function and be active. At poor levels, it is associated with such health outcomes as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Physical fitness testing in American youth was established on a large scale in the 1950s with an early focus on performance-related fitness that gradually gave way to an emphasis on health-related fitness. Using appropriately selected measures to collected fitness data in youth will advance our understanding of how fitness among youth translates into better health.

In Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth, the IOM assesses the relationship between youth fitness test items and health outcomes, recommends the best fitness test items, provides guidance for interpreting fitness scores, and provides an agenda for needed research.

The report concludes that selected cardiorespiratory endurance, musculoskeletal fitness, and body composition measures should be in fitness surveys and in schools. Collecting fitness data nationally and in schools helps with setting and achieving fitness goals and priorities for public health at an individual and national level.

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