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Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Implementing Passenger Rail Service on Shared Passenger and Freight Corridors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14376.
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Page 83
Page 84
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Implementing Passenger Rail Service on Shared Passenger and Freight Corridors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14376.
×
Page 84
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Implementing Passenger Rail Service on Shared Passenger and Freight Corridors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14376.
×
Page 85
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Implementing Passenger Rail Service on Shared Passenger and Freight Corridors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14376.
×
Page 86
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Implementing Passenger Rail Service on Shared Passenger and Freight Corridors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14376.
×
Page 87
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Bibliography." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2010. Guidebook for Implementing Passenger Rail Service on Shared Passenger and Freight Corridors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14376.
×
Page 88

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

This bibliography contains references and very short descriptions of books, papers, reports and other publications that may be useful to Guidebook users. All publications included in this bibliography should be readily available from publishers, databases such as TRIS, or source orga- nizations, either in hard copy or as downloads from the source organizations. Publications that might become rapidly outdated or become unavailable in a short time have been avoided. This bibliography is not a complete list of references used in preparing the Guidebook, which would have included numerous unpublished or draft reports, papers and meeting presentations, as well as material taken from Web sites of passenger railroads and federal, state, and local government agencies. This bibliography is organized by subject areas relevant to the issues addressed in the Guidebook or in some cases by the source of material. Within subject areas, items are listed in chronological or alphabetical order, depending on which is judged to be the most helpful to the reader. Acts of Congress (reverse chronological order) 2009: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Among numerous other provisions, ARRA provided $8 billion in grant funding for intercity high-speed rail, as well as funds for Amtrak and commuter rail. 2008: Passenger Rail Investment and Improvement Act (PRIIA). This legislation authorized a 5-year continuation of capital and operations support of Amtrak, added grant programs for conven- tional and high-speed passenger service, and enacted a number of key policy changes concerning passenger service. 2008: Rail Safety Improvement Act (RSIA). This legislation amended or added rail safety regulations in several areas, most notably adding a requirement for installation of PTC on certain routes used by regularly scheduled passenger rail service and specified hazardous materials. 1995: ICC Termination Act. This act terminated the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) and transferred selected functions to a newly established agency, the Surface Transportation Board (STB). 1981: Northeast Rail Service Act (NERSA). Among other provisions, this legislation relieved Consolidated Rail Corporation (Conrail) of all responsibilities for commuter rail service, requir- ing regional commuter rail agencies to take over operations or contract with Amtrak to operate commuter rail services. 1980: Staggers Rail Act. This legislation removed many of the economic regulations applicable to freight railroads related to setting shipping rates, line sales and abandonments, etc., and setting the freight railroad industry on a path to prosperity. 83 Bibliography

1976: Railroad Revitalization and Regulatory Reform Act. This act implemented many of the rec- ommendations of the U.S. Railroad Association for restructuring the northeast U.S. railroad net- work, including creating the Consolidated Rail Corporation (Conrail) to take ownership of the bankrupt freight railroads, transferring the Northeast Corridor to Amtrak, and providing sub- stantial funding for physical improvements. 1973: Regional Rail Reorganization Act (the 3-R Act). This act initiated the process of restructuring the Northeast railroads after the PennCentral bankruptcy, by creating the U.S. Railway Association, tasked with developing a long-term restructuring plan. 1970: Rail Passenger Service Act, with later amendments. This legislation established Amtrak to manage the U.S. intercity and long-distance passenger rail network. 1934: Railroad Retirement Act. This act established the railroad retirement system to provide pen- sions for retired railroad employees, which, with numerous amendments, has continued to the present day. 1926: Rail Labor Act (RLA). With numerous subsequent amendments, this legislation specified how relations between railroad management and the railroad trades union are to be conducted. Government Accountability Office (GAO) Reports (Reverse chronological order) The content of GAO Reports is usually obvious from the title, thus notes on the content are omit- ted from this section of the bibliography. 2009: High Speed Passenger Rail—Effectively Using Recovery Act Funds for High Speed Rail Projects. Report GAO-09-786T, June. 2009: High Speed Passenger Rail—Future Development Will Depend on Addressing Financial and Other Challenges and Establishing a Clear Federal Role. Report GAO-09-417, March. 2009: Commuter Rail—Many Factors Influence Liability and Indemnity Provisions and Options Exist to Facilitate Negotiations. Report GAO-09-282, February. 2006: Active Commuter Rail Agency Service Contracts. Letter to Honorable Richard C. Shelby, Chairman, Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs, United States Senate. Document GAO-06-820R, July. 2005: Testimony before the Subcommittee on Railroads, Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, House of Representatives. Amtrak—Acela’s Continued Problems Underscore the Importance of Meeting Broader Challenges in Managing Large-Scale Projects. Report GAO-05-698T, May. 2004: Commuter Rail—Information and Guidance Could Help Facilitate Commuter and Freight Rail Access Negotiations. GAO Report GAO-04-240. Federal Government Regulations and Industry Technical Standards American Railway Engineering and Maintenance Association (AREMA). Communications and Signaling Manual (current edition). This manual contains technical standards for the design, instal- lation and maintenance of railroad signal and train control and communications systems. The manual is regularly modified and updated to reflect changing industry needs and the introduction of new technologies, as well as changes in FRA safety regulations and railroad service needs. 84 Guidebook for Implementing Passenger Rail Service on Shared Passenger and Freight Corridors

Federal Railroad Administration and Federal Transit Administration: “Joint Statement of Agency Policy Concerning Shared Use of the Tracks of the General Rail System by Conventional Railroads and Light Rail Transit Systems.” Federal Register, July 10, 2000. American Railway Engineering and Maintenance Association (AREMA). Manual for Railway Engineering (current edition). This manual contains technical standards for the design, installation, inspection and maintenance of railroad track, structures, and electrification systems. The manual is regularly updated to reflect new technologies, materials, and methods, as well as changes in FRA safety regulations and railroad service needs. Association of American Railroads (AAR). Manual of Standards and Recommended Practices (cur- rent edition). This manual is primarily concerned with freight railroad cars and locomotives, but some standards are regularly used in specifications for passenger cars and locomotives. Examples are wheels, axles, bearings and couplers. The manual is regularly modified and updated and updates may be automatically distributed to subscribers. American Public Transportation Association (APTA). Passenger Rail Equipment Safety Standards (PRESS) (current edition). This manual contains standards for the design, construction, inspec- tion and maintenance of railroad passenger cars. The manual is regularly updated to reflect new technologies, materials and methods, as well as changes in FRA safety regulations and railroad service needs. Federal Railroad Administration. Railroad Safety Regulations located in 49 CFR Parts 200 to 299. The most important standards for passenger rail interests are Part 213, Track Safety Standards; Part 236, Signal and Train Control System Regulations; and Part 238, Passenger Car Safety Standards. These and other FRA safety regulations relevant to passenger rail operations at both conventional and high speeds are actively being revised and updated in response to provisions in PRIIA and to meet the need for safety regulations for high-speed railroad systems. 49 CFR 243, “FOX High Speed Rail Safety Standards, Proposed Rule,” Federal Register, Decem- ber 12, 1997. This “rule of particular applicability” was developed to govern safety on the proposed FOX high-speed train service in Florida. This service was to operate on a dedicated corridor using French TGV technology. It is likely to serve as a model for similar proposed high-speed rail systems in the future. U.S. Department of Transportation. “Talgo Train operations on U.S. Railroad Corridors.” DOT Docket Management System (DMS) Reference FRA-1999-6404. Items 86 and 87. (1999). These docket items document a series and structural and risk analyses to support a waiver application to operate the non-FRA-compliant Talgo on Washington State’s Cascades Corridor. Capacity and Cost Analysis AECOM. “Cost-Allocation Methods for Commuter, Intercity and Freight Rail Operations on Shared-Use Rail Systems and Corridors,” September 2006. Final Report for NCHRP Project 20-65 (Task 12). This project was the predecessor to NCHRP Project 8-64, which produced this Guide- book. It focused specifically on access costs and operating cost sharing. AECOM. NCHRP Research Results Digest 313: Cost-Allocation Methods for Commuter, Intercity, and Freight Rail Operations on Shared-Use Rail Systems and Corridors, February 2007. A summary of the above. Interstate Commerce Commission. Costing Methodologies for the Northeast Corridor Commuter: Commuter Service. Ex Parte 417, February 1983. The decision that established the process for shar- ing Northeast Corridor operating costs between Amtrak and the commuter rail agencies using the Bibliography 85

corridor. This approach gives commuter agencies access to the corridor at incremental cost. This provision was superseded in 2008 by the provisions of Section 212 of PRIIA. Zeta-Tech. Estimating Maintenance Costs for Mixed High-Speed Passenger and Freight Railroad Corridors. Technical Monograph prepared for the FRA Office of Railroad Development (April 2004). Detailed discussion of cost sharing methodologies, using an approach that uses engineering analyses to calculate each user’s contribution to track wear and degradation. Passenger Rail Projects and Project Planning California DOT: California Rail Passenger Program Report 1993/4 – 2002/3. December 1993. California DOT: Amtrak 20-Year Plan, March 2001. California DOT has published numerous short- and long-term plans and reports, including those previously cited and annual short-term plans for the Pacific Surfliner and San Joaquin corridors as well as periodically-updated strategic plans. The Capitol Corridor Joint Powers Authority [www.capitolcorridor.org (as of 2009)], a separate organization, publishes similar plans for sub- mission to California DOT. Federal Railroad Administration. Vision for High Speed Rail in America. Revised version, May 2009. A contribution to FRA’s strategic planning process as required by ARRA. Describes the structure of the emerging FRA funding proposals and grant programs. Federal Railroad Administration. Root Causes of Amtrak Train Delays. Report CR-2008-076, September 2008. A good analysis for persistent delay problems experienced by Amtrak services. Intercity Passenger Rail Transportation. AASHTO Standing Committee on Rail Transportation Report, 2002. New Mexico DOT: Belen to Santa Fe Commuter Rail Project: Project Development History, October 2009. Very detailed description of the implementation of this service from the initial go-ahead decision to start of service over the complete rail corridor. Walsh, Joseph M. “A Sound Decision.” Trains Magazine, November 2009. Description of the devel- opment of the Sounder commuter rail service between Tacoma, Seattle, and Everett, Washington. Washington State DOT: Long Range Plan for Amtrak Cascades, February 2006. An example of a thorough long-term plan for a key rail corridor. Like California DOT, Washington State DOT pub- lishes regularly updated short and long-term plans for the Cascades corridor. Other Shared-Use Issues, Including Liability and Safety Bing, Alan. 1989. Railroad Encroachment Study. Final Report to Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority, April. Detailed study of risks from freight train accidents on corridors shared with rail rapid transit. Bing, Alan J., Tsai, Thomas, Nelson, David, and Mayville, Ronald A. 2007. “Safety of Noncompliant Passenger Rail Equipment.” Transportation Research Circular E-C112: Joint International Light Rail Conference: A World of Applications and Opportunities, April 9–11, 2006, St. Louis, Missouri. http:// onlinepubs.trb.org/onlinepubs/circulars/ec112.pdf. Booz Allen Hamilton, Jacobs Edwards & Kelcey, ICF Consulting, and New Jersey Institute of Technology. 2009. TCRP Report 130: Shared Use of Railroad Infrastructure with Noncompliant Public Transit Vehicles: A Practitioners Guide. 86 Guidebook for Implementing Passenger Rail Service on Shared Passenger and Freight Corridors

Federal Transit Administration. 2005. Sharing of Tracks by Transit and Freight Railroads: Liability and Insurance Issues. FTA Final Report FTA-TRI-10-2005.1. Gross, Yehuda and Mortensen, Steve. 2007. “US DOT Summary of the Shared Use Feasibility Study Report.” APTA Rail Conference, June. Phraner, D. 2001. TCRP Research Results Digest 43: Supplementing and Updating TCRP Report 52: Joint Operation of Light Rail Transit or Diesel Multiple Unit Vehicles with Railroads Issue. Phraner, D. 2000a. “Light Rail Sharing Track with Other Rail Modes: How Far Have We Come at the Millennium?” The 8th Joint Conference on Light Rail Transit, Dallas, Texas. Phraner, D. 2000b. “German Shared Track Experience Independent Supplemental Technical Study Tour Findings” Final Report for TCRP Project J-06, Task 34. Phraner, D.,1 Roberts, R.T., Stangas, P.K., Korach, K.A., Shortreed, J.H., and Thompson, G.J. 1999. TCRP Report 52: Joint Operation of Light Rail Transit or Diesel Multiple Unit Vehicles with Railroads. Resor, Randolph R. and Hickey, Thomas. 2005. Shared-Use Rail Corridors. A Survey of Current Practice and Recommendations for the Future. American Public Transportation Conference. Resor, Randolph R. 2003. Catalog of “Common Use” Railroad Corridors. FRA Report DOT/FRA/ ORD/03/16. Liu, Ronfang et. al. 2004. Survey of Transit/Rail Freight Interaction. Final Report submitted to the New Jersey Department of Transportation. Ullman, Kenneth B. and Bing, Alan J. 1995. High Speed Trains in Freight Railroad Corridors: Operations and Safety Considerations. FRA Report DOT/FRA/ORD-95/05. This report contains a discussion of the capacity impact of introducing high-speed passenger trains on freight rail corri- dors and actions required to ensure that such operations were safe. The report includes simple oper- ations simulations and accident risk analysis. Miscellaneous Amtrak System Timetable. Published twice a year. The summer 2008 edition was consulted for this Guidebook. Association of American Railroads: Small Railroads; published by the AAR’s Economics and Finance Department, 1983 and later editions. General description of the shortline and regional rail- road industry. Cambridge Systematics and SYSTRA Consulting Inc. High-Speed Rail: A National Perspective. Final Report prepared for National Passenger Railroad Corporation, December 2008. An overview of Amtrak’s current operations and discussions of the possibilities and problems of developing high-speed rail on U.S. corridors. Note report was drafted before passage of PRIIA. Loving, Rush Jr. The Men Who Loved Trains. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana, 2009. A lively account of people and events involved in the restructuring of the U.S. passenger and freight railroad industries during the period 1970 to 1987. Bibliography 87 1 The series of reports and papers by David Phraner, cited above, provide a detailed discussion of the benefits and problems of operating a light rail service on track shared with conventional freight railroad operations. The reports also describe experience with overseas operations of this type.

National Surface Transportation Policy and Revenue Study Commission. Transportation for Tomorrow. December 2007. Comprehensive review of issues associated with all surface transporta- tion in the United States, focused on capacity, state of repair, and funding. See also next citation. National Surface Transportation Policy and Revenue Study Commission. Vision for the Future: US Intercity Passenger Rail Network Through 2050. This is the contribution of the Passenger Rail Working Group of the Commission to the main report Transportation for Tomorrow. Contains a good high-level discussion of the potential benefit of and barriers to implementing high-speed rail in the United States. Perl, Anthony. New Departures: Rethinking Passenger Rail Policy in the Twenty-first Century. Published University Press of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 2002. Discussion of passenger rail policy alternatives for North America, in the light of successful approaches used elsewhere in the world and 21st century transportation, energy, and climate change challenges. Surface Transportation Board. A Study of Competition in the US Freight Railroad Industry and Analysis of Proposals that Might Enhance Competition. Prepared by Laurits R. Christensen and Associates for the STB, November 2008, with later supplements. Focused primarily on rail freight, this report includes an analysis and discussion of reported capacity problems on the U.S. rail network. Transportation Research Board. “Research Problem Statements on Intercity Passenger Rail.” TRB Circular No. 490, 1999. Useful checklist of intercity passenger rail research needs at time of publi- cation. The report might help facilitate the development of intercity passenger rail systems by sum- marizing what research has been done and what remains. Vantuono, William C. The Railroad: What it Is, What it Does, 5th Edition, Simmons-Boardman Books Inc., Omaha, Nebraska, 2008. A general description of North American freight railroading practices in all engineering, mechanical, operations, and commercial areas. 88 Guidebook for Implementing Passenger Rail Service on Shared Passenger and Freight Corridors

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TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 657: Guidebook for Implementing Passenger Rail Service on Shared Passenger and Freight Corridors is designed to aid states in developing public–private partnerships with private freight railroads to permit operation of passenger services over shared-use rail corridors.

The guidebook explores improved principles, processes, and methods to support agreements on access, allocation of operation and maintenance costs, capacity allocation, operational issues, future responsibilities for infrastructure improvements, and other fundamental issues.

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