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Page 251
Suggested Citation:"Appendix K - References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Using Electronic Devices While Driving: Legislation and Enforcement Implications. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26082.
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Page 252
Suggested Citation:"Appendix K - References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Using Electronic Devices While Driving: Legislation and Enforcement Implications. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26082.
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Page 252
Page 253
Suggested Citation:"Appendix K - References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Using Electronic Devices While Driving: Legislation and Enforcement Implications. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26082.
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Page 253
Page 254
Suggested Citation:"Appendix K - References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Using Electronic Devices While Driving: Legislation and Enforcement Implications. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26082.
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Page 254

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K-1 Alberta Office of Traffic Safety. (2013). Published/aired February 2013. Atwood, J., Guo, F., Fitch, G., and Dingus, T. A. (2018). The Driver-Level Crash Risk Associated with Daily Cellphone Use and Cellphone Use While Driving. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 119, 149–154. Caird, J. K., Johnston, K. A., Willness, C. R., Asbridge, M., and Steel, P. (2014). A Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Texting on Driving. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 71, 311–318. Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators. (2018). Distracted Driving White Paper. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2011). Mobile Device Use While Driving—United States and Seven European Countries. MMWR 2013; 62:10, 177–182. Chaudhary, N. and Raboin, K. (2018). Cell Phone Use While Driving in Maine. On behalf of the Maine Bureau of Highway Safety, September 7, 2018. Daniel, C. (2018). Consumer Perspectives on Automobile Insurance, Report of the Consumer Representative, Alberta Automobile Insurance Rate Board, August 2018. Elvik, R. (2016). Association Between Increase in Fixed Penalties and Road Safety Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 92, 202–210. Fischer, P. (2019). Peer-to-Peer Teen Traffic Safety Program Guide. (Report No. DOT HS 812 631). Washing- ton, D.C.: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. https://www.nhtsa.gov/sites/nhtsa.dot.gov/files/ documents/13905_peer2peerbrochure_031519_v4-blankpages-tag.pdf. Henness, S. A., and Ball, A. (2019). Engaging Youth as Influencers in Leadership Event Planning. Journal of Human Sciences and Extension, 7(1). International Association of Chiefs of Police. (2019). Distracted Driving: Promising Practices and Lessons Learned from the Field, Virginia 2019. https://www.theiacp.org/resources/document/distracted-driving- toolkit. Lee, J. D., Young, K. L., and Regan, M. A. (2008). Defining Driver Distraction. Driver Distraction: Theory, Effects, and Mitigation, 13(4), 31–40. Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and Security and Maine Highway Safety. (2018). Just Drive, April 2018. National Center for Statistics and Analysis. (2019a). Distracted Driving in Fatal Crashes, 2017. (Traffic Safety Facts Research Note. Report No. DOT HS 812 700). Washington, D.C.: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. National Center for Statistics and Analysis. (2019b). 2018 Fatal Motor Vehicle Crashes: Overview. (Traffic Safety Facts Research Note. Report No. DOT HS 812 826). Washington, D.C.: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. National Center for Statistics and Analysis. (2019c). Driver Electronic Device Use in 2018. (Traffic Safety Facts Research Note. Report No. DOT HS 812 818). Washington, D.C.: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. National Safety Council. (2012). Understanding the Distracted Brain: Why Driving While Using Hands-Free Cell Phones Is Risky Behavior, White Paper, April 2012. National Youth Leadership Council. (2016). Project Ignition Teen Driver Safety Best Practices Toolkit. St. Paul, MN. Nebraska Annual Traffic Safety Study. (2018). For the Nebraska Safety Council and Nebraska Department of Transportation Highway Safety Office, May 2018. Nichols, J. L., Tippetts, A. S., Fell, J. C., Eichelberger, A. H., and Haseltine, P. W. (2014). The Effects of Primary Enforcement Laws and Fine Levels on Seat Belt Usage in the United States. Traffic Injury Prevention, 6, 640–644. References A P P E N D I X K

K-2 Using Electronic Devices While Driving: Legislation and Enforcement Implications Oregon Department of Transportation. (2017). Reducing Distracted Driving in Oregon: An Interdisciplinary Approach to a Statewide Problem, Distracted Driving Task Force Report, February 2017. Owens, J. M., Dingus, T. A., Guo, F., Fang, Y., Perez, M., and McClafferty, J. (2018). Crash Risk of Cell Phone Use While Driving: A Case-Crossover Analysis of Naturalistic Driving Data. AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Oviedo-Trespalacios, O., Haque, M. M., King, M., and Washington, S. (2016). Understanding the Impacts of Mobile Phone Distraction on Driving Performance: A Systematic Review. Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, 72, 360–380. Tennessee Highway Patrol. (2019). Facebook, July 1, 2019, 6:43 a.m. https://www.facebook.com/Tennessee HighwayPatrol/. Virginia DMV and Virginia Tech. (2018). #YourSayVA Digital Town Hall Distracted Driver Survey Response Assessment. Vermont Agency of Transportation. (2018). Knowledge, Attitudes and Behavior Survey, Governor’s Highway Safety Program, August 2018. West Virginia Division of Motor Vehicles – Highway Safety. (n.d.) Governor’s Highway Safety Program. Available at https://transportation.wv.gov/DMV/Safety/Pages/default.aspx. World Health Organization. (2011). Mobile Phone Use: A Growing Problem of Driver Distraction. World Health Organization. Engaging Young People for Health and Sustainable Development: Strategic Oppor- tunities for the World Health Organization and Partners. (2018). Geneva: World Health Organization.

Abbreviations and acronyms used without definitions in TRB publications: A4A Airlines for America AAAE American Association of Airport Executives AASHO American Association of State Highway Officials AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials ACI–NA Airports Council International–North America ACRP Airport Cooperative Research Program ADA Americans with Disabilities Act APTA American Public Transportation Association ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials ATA American Trucking Associations CTAA Community Transportation Association of America CTBSSP Commercial Truck and Bus Safety Synthesis Program DHS Department of Homeland Security DOE Department of Energy EPA Environmental Protection Agency FAA Federal Aviation Administration FAST Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (2015) FHWA Federal Highway Administration FMCSA Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration FRA Federal Railroad Administration FTA Federal Transit Administration HMCRP Hazardous Materials Cooperative Research Program IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ISTEA Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 ITE Institute of Transportation Engineers MAP-21 Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (2012) NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAO National Association of State Aviation Officials NCFRP National Cooperative Freight Research Program NCHRP National Cooperative Highway Research Program NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration NTSB National Transportation Safety Board PHMSA Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration RITA Research and Innovative Technology Administration SAE Society of Automotive Engineers SAFETEA-LU Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (2005) TCRP Transit Cooperative Research Program TDC Transit Development Corporation TEA-21 Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (1998) TRB Transportation Research Board TSA Transportation Security Administration U.S. DOT United States Department of Transportation

N O N -P R O F IT O R G . U .S . P O S TA G E P A ID C O LU M B IA , M D P E R M IT N O . 88 Transportation Research Board 500 Fifth Street, N W W ashington, D C 20001 AD D RESS SERVIC E REQ U ESTED ISBN 978-0-309-67379-2 9 7 8 0 3 0 9 6 7 3 7 9 2 9 0 0 0 0

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Distracted driving is a complex and ever-increasing risk to public safety on roadways. Drivers’ use of electronic devices significantly diverts human attention resources away from the driving task. The enforcement community faces significant challenges as electronic device use has expanded beyond simply texting or talking. Legislation regulating electronic device use while driving is inconsistent in content and implementation.

The TRB Behavioral Traffic Safety Cooperative Research Program's BTSCRP Research Report 1: Using Electronic Devices While Driving: Legislation and Enforcement Implications presents the results of an examination of the current state and provincial legislation on electronic device use while driving; evaluates the benefits and impediments associated with enacting, enforcing, and adjudicating electronic device use; and proposes model legislation and educational materials that can be used by relevant stakeholders to enact a law and educate key individuals on the importance of the law.

Supplemental the report is a presentation for law enforcement.

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