National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: References
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×

Appendix

Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff

ELIZABETH A. (BETSY) DAVIS (Chair) is a professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Education. Her research focuses on beginning and experienced elementary teachers, teachers learning to engage in rigorous and consequential science teaching, and the roles of curriculum materials and practice-based teacher education in promoting teacher learning. She was the chair for the Elementary Teacher Education Program at the University of Michigan for 4 years and helped lead the reshaping and redesign of this practice-based program. Davis received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers at the White House in 2002 and the Jan Hawkins Early Career Award in 2004. She was a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Committee on Strengthening Science Education through a Teacher Learning Continuum and the Workshop Planning Committee on Design, Selection, and Implementation of Instructional Materials for the Next Generation Science Standards. Davis earned a B.S.E. in engineering and management systems at Princeton University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in education in mathematics, science, and technology from the University of California, Berkeley.

HEIDI CARLONE is the Katherine Johnson Chair of Science Education in the Peabody College at Vanderbilt University. She was previously the Hooks Distinguished Professor of STEM Education in the Department of Teacher Education and Higher Education at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She is a teacher educator and educational researcher who works to make science and engineering pathways more accessible and equitable for historically underserved and under-represented populations.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×

Her work leverages insights from research and practice. Her current work focuses on three primary questions: (1) How can innovative K–8 science and engineering instruction cultivate more meaningful and expansive learning outcomes (e.g., STEM identities) for diverse youth? (2) How can we enrich K–8 diverse youths’ science and engineering learning ecologies in sustainable ways? (3) How can we design professional learning networks to support, nurture, and celebrate rigorous and equitable science and engineering teaching and retain excellent teachers in high needs schools? She has received a number of awards in her academic career, including the UNCG Alumni Teaching Excellence Award; the Early Career Research Award from the National Association for Research in Science Teaching; and the Early Career Development Award (CAREER) from the National Science Foundation. Carlone received her Ph.D. in instruction and curriculum from the University of Colorado Boulder.

JEANANE CHARARA is a professional development provider and K–2 science coach with the SOLID Start research project at Michigan State University. She also is currently a peer reviewer on WestEd’s NextGen-Science Peer Review Panel and is an EQuIP Science Leader. She evaluates science curriculum and determines their alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), as well as provides professional development on how to use the EQuIP rubric. She also works as an NGSX elementary pathway designer. Chahara was previously an elementary STEAM coach for Dearborn, Michigan, Public Schools, where she provided professional development to K–5 teachers and helped guide teacher pedagogies to more equitable science teaching practices and NGSS-aligned instruction. She also coached K–5 teachers by providing them with support in the science classroom and allowing them opportunities to demonstrate effective science instruction. She has formerly taught as an elementary teacher and was the distance learning coordinator at the Michigan Science Center. Charara has a B.S. in elementary education with a focus in integrated sciences from Wayne State University and an M.Ed. in education with an emphasis on teaching English as a second or foreign language from Spring Arbor University.

DOUGLAS H. CLEMENTS is distinguished university professor, Kenney endowed chair in early childhood learning, and co-executive director of the Marsico Institute at University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education. Previously, he worked as a kindergarten teacher for 5 years and a preschool teacher for 1 year and has since conducted research and published widely in the areas of (1) the learning and teaching of early mathematics and STEM; (2) computer applications in mathematics education; (3) creating, using, and evaluating research-based curricula in STEM and in taking successful curricula to scale using technologies and learning trajectories;

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×

(4) development and evaluation of innovative assessments of mathematics achievement, as well as mathematics teaching; and (5) interdisciplinary and inclusive approaches to STEM subjects. Prior to his appointment at the University of Denver, he was a State University of New York (SUNY) distinguished professor at the University of Buffalo. Clements received his Ph.D. in elementary education from SUNY at Buffalo.

KATIE MCMILLAN CULP is the chief learning officer at the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI). In this role, she oversees the design, development, and implementation of NYSCI’s exhibits, programs, and youth development initiatives. She also leads NYSCI’s research and development team, which studies STEM learning among highly diverse populations in complex informal learning environments. Culp has also served as the director of research for the U.S. Department of Education-funded Regional Educational Laboratory for the Northeast and Islands, and directed many program evaluations focused on technology-rich STEM learning while working as a research scientist at Education Development Center, Inc. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Intel Foundation. Culp is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Amherst College and holds a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University.

XIMENA DOMÍNGUEZ is the director of early STEM research at Digital Promise. Her research focuses on young children’s science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning across home and school and involves partnerships with public preschool educators, curriculum developers, media designers and families from historically underserved communities to co-design equitable learning experiences for young children. In addition to studying how science and mathematics can be promoted early in childhood, her current work investigates how engineering and computational thinking can be introduced to support play and early learning and explores how STEM domains can be feasibly and meaningfully integrated in preschool classrooms. Her work also involves developing resources for multilingual learners and explores the affordances of technology and media for supporting early STEM teaching and learning. Her work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Institute of Education Sciences, and philanthropic foundations. Domínguez earned an M.S.Ed. in education from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in applied developmental psychology from the University of Miami.

DARYL GREENFIELD is a professor of psychology and pediatrics at the University of Miami. He served as a member of the Expert Panel for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research’s Networks of Centers of Excellence

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×

in Early Childhood Development and Society; an advisor for the Pan American Health Organization; a technical adviser for early science for each of the three funded statewide KEA Consortia (led by Maryland, North Carolina, and Texas) to create greater continuity between early childhood and the early elementary grades; and an adviser to the Office of Head Start for the new Head Start Early Learning Outcomes Framework (Birth to Five). He is currently a principal investigator on federally and privately funded research grants to develop and evaluate early childhood STE programs and with prior federal funding developed and evaluated equated touch screen computer adaptive preschool science assessments, for both English and Spanish speaking young children. He currently serves as the early childhood STE advisor for the Head Start National Center on Early Child Development, Teaching and Learning, the National Center on Parent, Family and Community Engagement, and the National STEM Innovation for Inclusion in Early Education Center. Greenfield received his Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of Connecticut.

MEGAN HOPKINS is an associate professor of education studies at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Before joining UCSD, she held faculty appointments at the Pennsylvania State University and University of Illinois at Chicago. In studies funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of English Language Acquisition, the Spencer Foundation, and the W.T. Grant Foundation, she has investigated the implementation of language policies and English language development course placement policies, as well as content-specific curricular reforms. She has also engaged in context-embedded teacher professional development focused on fostering science learning opportunities for multilingual learners in the early elementary grades. Her scholarship has appeared in several top-tier journals, including American Educational Research Journal, Educational Researcher, and Journal of Teacher Education, and she is coeditor of the volumes Forbidden Language: English Learners and Restrictive Language Policies and School Integration Matters: Research-Based Strategies to Advance Equity. In 2012, she received the Dissertation of the Year Award from the Bilingual Education Research Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association. In 2016, she was selected as a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow. She served on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine consensus committee that authored the report English Learners in STEM Subjects: Transforming Classrooms, Schools, and Lives (2018). Hopkins received her Ph.D. in education at the University of California, Los Angeles.

MARGARET KELLY is a senior program assistant for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Board on Science Education.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×

Margaret has more than 20 years of experience working in the administrative field. She has worked for the private sector, federal government and non-profit organizations, including American University, Catholic University, the Census Bureau, International Franchise Association, the Department of Defense and the University of the District of Columbia. Kelly has received numerous professional honors and awards throughout her career, including a Citizenship/Spirit Award; a Teamwork/Collaboration Award; a Superior Performance of Customer Service Award; Sustained Superior Performance Cash Awards; and Air Force Organizational Excellence Awards and Certificates of Appreciations.

EVE MANZ is assistant professor of science education at the Boston University Wheelock College of Education & Human Development. Her research focuses on understanding how to design and orchestrate learning environments that apprentice young students into science practices, such as modeling, argumentation, and explanation. She works closely with elementary teachers and instructional leaders to develop approaches to science teaching and learning that center student and teacher sensemaking, which includes understanding elementary teaching and learning as part of a multicontent area system to better support classroom instruction within and across the content areas of science, English language arts, and mathematics. Her work has been funded by the James S. McDonnell Foundation, the George Lucas Educational Foundation, and a CAREER grant from the National Science Foundation. She is the recipient of the 2019 Early Career Research Award from the National Association for Research in Science Teaching. Manz received her Ph.D. in mathematics and science education from Vanderbilt University.

TIFFANY NEILL is the deputy superintendent of curriculum and instruction for the Oklahoma State Board of Education and the past president for the Council of State Science Supervisors. She is a member of the National Science Foundation STEM Advisory Panel, an active advisory board member for Carnegie’s OpenSciEd Project and EdReports for Science. She also serves as co-principal investigator for Advancing Coherent and Equitable Systems of Science. Prior to her current role, Neill served as the executive director of curriculum and instruction for 3 years and as the director of science and engineering education for 5 years at the Oklahoma State Department of Education. She began her career in education as a middle and high school teacher. She served on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine consensus committee that authored the report Changing Expectations for the K12 Teacher Workforce: Policies, Preservice Education, Professional Development, and the Workplace (2020). Neill is completing a Ph.D. in instructional leadership and academic curriculum in science education at the University of Oklahoma.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×

K. RENAE PULLEN is an elementary science specialist for Caddo Parish Public Schools in Shreveport, Louisiana. Besides being a dedicated science educator, she has served on several local, state, and national committees as well as presented at numerous workshops and conferences. Pullen was a consulting expert for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s practitioner’s guide, Seeing Students Learn Science: Integrating Assessment and Instruction in the Classroom, and served on the National Academies’ committee that produced English Learners in STEM Subjects: Transforming Classrooms, Schools, and Lives. She is currently a member of the National Academies’ Board on Science Education, serves on the National Science Foundation’s STEM Education Advisory Panel, and is a National STEM Ambassador for the National Science Teaching Association/National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Pullen received an M.Ed. in education leadership from Louisiana State University in Shreveport and is certified as a teacher leader by the state of Louisiana.

WILLIAM SANDOVAL is a professor in the Division of Urban Schooling in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, and is also the faculty director of the school’s Educational Leadership Program. His primary research interest is in how children understand the nature of scientific knowledge and its production and how to promote their understanding through epistemically rich teaching. He is particularly focused on how school can improve public understanding and engagement with science. He has published widely in the learning sciences, science education, and educational psychology on epistemic cognition and student and teacher learning. He has served as an associate editor of Journal of the Learning Sciences and is on their editorial board as well as the boards of Cognition & Instruction, Educational Psychologist, and Science Education and Journal for Research in Science Teaching. He is a fellow and past president of the International Society of the Learning Sciences, a fellow of the International Society for Design & Development in Education, and a member of the American Educational Research Association, National Association for Research in Science Teaching, National Science Teaching Association, and the American Psychological Association. Sandoval received his Ph.D. in learning sciences from Northwestern University.

HEIDI SCHWEINGRUBER is the director of the Board on Science Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has served as study director or co-study director for a wide range of studies, including those on revising national standards for K–12 science education, learning and teaching science in grades K–8, and mathematics learning in early childhood. She also coauthored two award-winning books for practi-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×

tioners that translate findings of National Academies’ reports for a broader audience, on using research in K–8 science classrooms and on informal science education. Prior to joining the National Academies, she worked as a senior research associate at the Institute of Education Sciences in the U.S. Department of Education. She also previously served on the faculty of Rice University and as the director of research for the Rice University School Mathematics Project, an outreach program in K–12 mathematics education. Schweingruber has a Ph.D. in psychology (developmental) and anthropology and a certificate in culture and cognition, both from the University of Michigan.

AMY STEPHENS (Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Board on Science Education of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She is an adjunct professor for the Southern New Hampshire University Psychology Department, teaching graduate-level online courses in cognitive psychology and statistics. She has an extensive background in behavioral and functional neuroimaging techniques and has examined a variety of different populations spanning childhood through adulthood. She was the study director for the workshop on Graduate Training in the Social and Behavioral Sciences and recently released consensus reports English Learners in STEM Subjects: Transforming Classrooms, Schools, and Lives (2018), Changing Expectations for the K–12 Workforce: Policies, Preservice Education, Professional Development, and the Workplace (2020), and Cultivating Interest and Competencies in Computing: Authentic Experiences and Design Factors (2021). Stephens holds a Ph.D. in cognitive neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University and was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Talented Youth and the university’s School of Education.

ENRIQUE SUÁREZ is an assistant professor of science education at University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is committed to making science learning equitable for students and teachers, emphasizing the importance of knowing about the natural world through investigation. Drawing on a range of learning theories, Suárez works in partnership with K–12 schools and communities to make science learning more equitable for learners from historically underserved communities. Specifically, his research focuses on designing learning environments that create opportunities for elementary-age emerging multilingual students to leverage their conceptual resources and translanguaging practices for learning science. He has extensive experience teaching elementary science methods courses, co-designing and co-facilitating professional development for K–12 science teachers, and developing physics-based K–12 curriculum. He is an astrophysicist who did cosmology research for 5 years before choosing a career in K–5 sci-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×

ence education. Suárez holds a B.S. in astrophysics from the University of Oklahoma, an M.S. in science education from Tufts University, and a Ph.D. on curriculum and instruction–science education from the University of Colorado Boulder.

TIFFANY E. TAYLOR is currently a program officer for the Board on Science Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. In this role, she provides research, planning, and management support for several ongoing projects including the Standing Committee on Advancing Science Communication and the Symposium on the Future of Undergraduate STEM Education. Additionally, she is co-leading an expert study requested by NASA on Increasing Diversity and Inclusion in the Leadership of Competed Space Missions, in collaboration with the Space Studies Board. She is extremely passionate about the inclusion of persons of diverse background in science and aspires to leverage her Ph.D. training and science policy experience to address education equity within society, in both domestic and global settings. She came to the National Academies as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy fellow in 2017. Taylor received her bachelor’s degree in biology from Howard University and her Ph.D. in biomedical sciences from the University of California, San Diego.

CARRIE TZOU is a professor in science education in the School of Educational Studies and the director of the Goodlad Institute for Educational Renewal at the University of Washington Bothell. Her work applies sociocultural theories of learning and identity formation and methods from anthropology, psychology, and design-based research to understand how best to support learners’ STEM-linked identities and center their cultural and linguistic resources within the context of science and environmental science learning. She focuses on desettling normative Western views and epistemologies of science, emphasizing the need to invite a heterogeneity of knowledge systems into all learning settings. This entails co-designing learning settings with multiple stakeholders (formal and informal educators, community organizations, families, and youth) that seek to make visible and center this heterogeneity, connecting learners’ identities and cultural practices to STEAM learning. Tzou holds an M.S. in teaching and learning with a concentration in science education from Vanderbilt University and a Ph.D. in learning sciences from Northwestern University.

PETER J. WINZER joined Bell Labs (Holmdel, NJ, USA) in 2000 and from 2010 to 2019 headed Bell Labs’ Optical Transmission Systems Research, first locally in NJ and then globally. His work has focused on all aspects of high-speed fiber-optic communications and networking, from opto-electronic devices and transmission systems to network architectures

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×

and network security. His research has significantly shaped the optical networking industry, including the optical portfolio of Lucent Technologies, Alcatel-Lucent, and Nokia, as well as the high-end test and measurement instrument market. In 2020, Winzer founded the VC-backed integrated optical communications start-up company Nubis Communications. He received multiple awards for his work, most notably the 2018 John Tyndall Award. He is a Clarivate Highly-Cited Researcher, a Bell Labs fellow, a fellow of Optical Society of America and of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, an elected member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, and holds an honorary doctorate from the Technical University of Eindhoven, The Netherlands. Winzer received his Ph.D. from the Vienna University of Technology, Austria.

CARLA ZEMBAL-SAUL holds the Kahn endowed professorship in STEM education at Pennsylvania State University. She is an educational researcher, science teacher educator, and biologist. Her work is situated in school–university–community partnerships in the United States and abroad. Her research investigates how preservice and practicing elementary teachers learn to engage children’s equitable sensemaking in science through participation in disciplinary discourses and practices. Zembal-Saul’s most recent work is situated in a semi-urban community undergoing rapid demographic shifts with teachers and other education professionals who work with emergent bilingual students and their families. She has been recognized for her scholarship in a number of ways: National Science Teaching Association fellow, Penn State College of Education Outstanding Faculty Member Award, Penn State Provost’s Award for Collaboration, and National Science Foundation Early Career Development Award. She served on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Science Education consensus committee that authored the report, Science Teachers’ Learning: Enhancing Opportunities, Creating Supporting Contexts (2015). Zembal-Saul received her Ph.D. in science education from the University of Michigan.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×
Page309
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×
Page310
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×
Page311
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×
Page312
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×
Page313
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×
Page314
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×
Page315
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×
Page316
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×
Page317
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26215.
×
Page318
Science and Engineering in Preschool Through Elementary Grades: The Brilliance of Children and the Strengths of Educators Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $40.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Starting in early childhood, children are capable of learning sophisticated science and engineering concepts and engage in disciplinary practices. They are deeply curious about the world around them and eager to investigate the many questions they have about their environment. Educators can develop learning environments that support the development and demonstration of proficiencies in science and engineering, including making connections across the contexts of learning, which can help children see their ideas, interests, and practices as meaningful not just for school, but also in their lives. Unfortunately, in many preschool and elementary schools science gets relatively little attention compared to English language arts and mathematics. In addition, many early childhood and elementary teachers do not have extensive grounding in science and engineering content.

Science and Engineering in Preschool through Elementary Grades provides evidence-based guidance on effective approaches to preschool through elementary science and engineering instruction that supports the success of all students. This report evaluates the state of the evidence on learning experiences prior to school; promising instructional approaches and what is needed for implementation to include teacher professional development, curriculum, and instructional materials; and the policies and practices at all levels that constrain or facilitate efforts to enhance preschool through elementary science and engineering.

Building a solid foundation in science and engineering in the elementary grades sets the stage for later success, both by sustaining and enhancing students' natural enthusiasm for science and engineering and by establishing the knowledge and skills they need to approach the more challenging topics introduced in later grades. Through evidence-based guidance on effective approaches to preschool through elementary science and engineering instruction, this report will help teachers to support the success of all students.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!