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Fostering Responsible Computing Research: Foundations and Practices (2022)

Chapter:Appendix A: Committee Member Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Fostering Responsible Computing Research: Foundations and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26507.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Fostering Responsible Computing Research: Foundations and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26507.
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Page95
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Fostering Responsible Computing Research: Foundations and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26507.
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Page96
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Fostering Responsible Computing Research: Foundations and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26507.
×
Page97
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Fostering Responsible Computing Research: Foundations and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26507.
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Page98

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A Committee Member Biographical Information BARBARA J. GROSZ, Chair, is Higgins Research Professor of Natural Sciences in the Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. Dr. Grosz has made groundbreaking contributions to the field of Artificial Intelligence through her pioneering research in natural language processing and in theories of multi-agent collaboration and their application to human-computer interaction. Her recent research has explored ways to use models developed in this research to improve health care coordination and science education. Dr. Grosz is also known for her role in the establishment and leadership of multidisciplinary institutions and is widely respected for her many contributions to the advancement of women in science. She co-founded Harvard’s Embedded Ethics program, which integrates teaching of ethical reasoning into core computer science courses. As founding dean of science and then dean of Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, she designed and launched the Institute’s science program and subsequently its “Academic Ventures” program. She was founding Chair of the Standing Committee for Stanford's One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence and has served on the boards of several scientific, scholarly and academic institutions, including serving on the CSTB 1994–1998. A member of the American Philosophical Society, Dr. Grosz is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a corresponding fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. She received the 2009 ACM/AAAI Allen Newell Award, the 2015 IJCAI Award for Research Excellence, and the 2017 Association for Computational Linguistics Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2017, Grosz received an Everett Mendelsohn Excellence in Mentoring Award from Harvard’s Graduate Student Council. Professor Grosz received an A.B. in mathematics from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley. MARK ACKERMAN is the George Herbert Mead Collegiate Professor of Human-Computer Interaction and a professor in the School of Information and in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His major research area is human-computer interaction (HCI), primarily computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW). He has published widely in HCI and CSCW, investigating collaborative information access in online knowledge communities, medical settings, expertise sharing, and most recently, pervasive environments. Dr. Ackerman is a member of the CHI Academy (HCI Fellow) and an ACM Fellow. Previously, Dr. Ackerman was a faculty member at the University of California, Irvine, and a research scientist at MIT’s Laboratory for Computer Science (now CSAIL). Before becoming an academic, Dr. Ackerman led the development of the first home banking system, had three Billboard Top-10 games for the Atari 2600, and worked on the X Window System’s first user-interface widget set. Dr. Ackerman has degrees from the University of Chicago, Ohio State, and MIT. Dr. Ackerman received is M.S. in computer science from The Ohio State University and his Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in information technologies. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION 94

STEVEN M. BELLOVIN is the Percy K. and Vidal L.W. Hudson Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University, member of the Cybersecurity and Privacy Center of the university’s Data Science Institute, and an affiliate faculty member at Columbia Law School. He does research on security and privacy and on related public policy issues. He received a B.A. from Columbia University, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Bellovin has served as the Chief Technologist of the Federal Trade Commission and as the Technology Scholar at the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. In the past, he has been a member of the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Advisory Committee, and the Technical Guidelines Development Committee of the Election Assistance Commission. MARIANO-FLORENTINO (TINO) CUÉLLAR is the 10th president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. A former justice of the Supreme Court of California, he served two U.S. presidents at the White House and in federal agencies and was a faculty member at Stanford University for two decades. Before serving on California’s highest court, he was the Stanley Morrison Professor of Law, Professor (by courtesy) of Political Science, and director of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford. A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Dr. Cuéllar is the author of Governing Security: The Hidden Origins of American Security Agencies (2013) and has published widely on transnational regulatory and security problems, American institutions, public law, and technology’s impact on law and government. Dr. Cuéllar co-authored the first ever report on the use of artificial intelligence across federal agencies. He has served on the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Commission on Accelerating Climate Action. He chairs the board of the William & Flora Hewlett Foundation and is a member of the Harvard Corporation. Born in Matamoros, Mexico, he grew up primarily in communities along the U.S.-Mexico border. He graduated from Harvard College and Yale Law School and received a Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University. DAVID DANKS is a professor of data science and philosophy and affiliate faculty in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California, San Diego. Previously he was a professor of philosophy and psychology, head of the Department of Philosophy, chief ethicist of the Block Center for Technology and Society, and co-director of the Center for Informed Democracy and Social Cybersecurity at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Danks is the recipient of a James S. McDonnell Foundation Scholar Award as well as an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship. He received an A.B. in philosophy from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in philosophy from University of California, San Diego. MEGAN FINN is an associate professor at the University of Washington Information School. She published the monograph Documenting Aftermath: Information Infrastructures in the Wake of Disasters about post-earthquake communication practices. Her newer projects examine ethical research practices in the field of computer security and investigate the implications of novel information policies on a transnational scale. She brings together perspectives and approaches from information studies, science and technology studies, and the history of media, information, and communication. In addition to her research and teaching, she is an advisor for the Science, Technology, and Society Studies Graduate Certificate program, a member of the iSchool’s DataLab, and starting in 2019, a core faculty in Data Science Studies at the eScience Institute. Dr. Finn has an undergraduate degree in computer science from the University of Michigan, completed her Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley, and spent time at Microsoft Research New England in Cambridge, MA, with the Social Media Collective as a postdoctoral researcher. MARY L. GRAY is a senior principal researcher at Microsoft Research and faculty associate at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. She also maintains a faculty position in the PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION 95

School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering with affiliations in Anthropology and Gender Studies at Indiana University. Dr. Gray, an anthropologist and media scholar by training, focuses on how everyday uses of technologies transform people’s lives. Dr. Gray is the author, with computer scientist Siddharth Suri, of Ghost Work: How to Stop Silicon Valley from Building a New Global Underclass published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in 2019. It was named a Financial Times’ Critic’s Pick and awarded the McGannon Center for Communication Research Book Prize in 2019. Her other books include In Your Face: Stories from the Lives of Queer Youth, Queering the Countryside: New Directions in Rural Queer Studies, a 2016 Choice Academic Title co-edited with Colin Johnson and Brian Gilley, and Out in the Country: Youth, Media, and Queer Visibility in Rural America, which looked at how young people in rural Southeast Appalachia use media to negotiate their sexual and gender identities, local belonging, and connections to broader, imagined queer communities. Dr. Gary received her Ph.D. in communications from the University of California, San Diego. JOHN L. HENNESSY is the chair of Alphabet, Inc.; professor of electrical engineering and computer science at Stanford University; and director of Stanford’s Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program. Dr. Hennessy served as president of Stanford University from September 2000 until August 2016. Dr. Hennessy, a pioneer in computer architecture, joined Stanford’s faculty in 1977 as an assistant professor of electrical engineering. In 1981, he drew together researchers to focus on a technology known as RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer), which revolutionized computing by increasing performance while reducing costs. Dr. Hennessy helped transfer this technology to industry co-founding MIPS Computer Systems in 1984. He is the co-author (with David Patterson) of two internationally used textbooks in computer architecture. His honors include the 2012 Medal of Honor of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the 2017 ACM Turing Award (jointly with David Patterson), the 2001 Eckert- Mauchly Award of the Association for Computing Machinery, the 2001 Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award, and the 2004 NEC C&C Prize for lifetime achievement in computer science and engineering. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Academy of Engineering, and the American Philosophical Society and has served on number of National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine boards and committees. Dr. Hennessy earned a Ph.D. in computer science from Stony Brook University. AYANNA M. HOWARD is the dean of The Ohio State University College of Engineering and professor in the college’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering with a joint appointment in Computer Science and Engineering. Previously she was chair of the Georgia Institute of Technology School of Interactive Computing in the College of Computing, as well as founder and director of the Human-Automation Systems Lab (HumAnS). Dr. Howard is the founder and president of the board of directors of Zyrobotics, a Georgia Tech spin-off company that develops mobile therapy and educational products for children with special needs. From 1993 to 2005, she worked at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where she held multiple roles including senior robotics researcher and deputy manager in the Office of the Chief Scientist. Dr. Howard earned her bachelor’s degree in computer engineering from Brown University, her master’s degree and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California, and her M.B.A. from Claremont Graduate University. JON M. KLEINBERG is a professor in both computer science and information science at Cornell University. His research focuses on issues at the interface of networks and information, with an emphasis on the social and information networks that underpin the Web and other on-line media. His work has been supported by an NSF Career Award, an ONR Young Investigator Award, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, a Packard Foundation Fellowship, a Sloan Foundation Fellowship, and grants from Google, Yahoo!, and the NSF. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Kleinberg received a B.S. in computer science from Cornell University in 1993 and a Ph.D., also in computer science, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1996. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION 96

SETH LAZAR is a professor in the School of Philosophy at the Australia National University, lead investigator on the Australian Research Council grant “Ethics and Risk,” director of a Templeton World Charity Foundation project on “Moral Skill and Artificial Intelligence,” and project leader of the major interdisciplinary research project: Humanising Machine Intelligence. In 2019, he was awarded the ANU Vice Chancellor’s award for excellence in research. His first book, Sparing Civilians (Oxford, 2015), aims to preserve the protection of civilians in war against political and philosophical threats that have arisen in recent years. A central focus of his early work on the ethics of war was the necessity of taking an approach more grounded in political philosophy than in moral philosophy—the same redirection is necessary for work on the morality, law and politics of data and AI. He has published papers in many top journals, including Ethics (2009, 2015, 2017), Philosophy and Public Affairs (2010, 2012, 2018), Australasian Journal of Philosophy (2015), Nous (2017), Synthese (2019), Philosophical Quarterly (2018), Philosophical Studies (2017), Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy (2017), and others. Dr. Lazar received his Ph.D. in political theory from Oxford University in 2009. JAMES MANYIKA is a senior partner at McKinsey & Company and chairman and director of McKinsey Global Institute. At MGI, Dr. Manyika has led research on technology, future of work, productivity and economic growth. He was appointed vice chair of the Global Development Council at the White House by President Obama and appointed by U.S. Commerce Secretaries to serve on the National Innovation Advisory Board from and the Commerce Department’s Digital Economy Board of Advisors. He is a Visiting Professor in Technology and Governance at Oxford University’s Blavatnik School of Government. He serves on the boards of Council on Foreign Relations, MacArthur Foundation, Hewlett Foundation, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and research advisory boards at MIT, Harvard, Oxford and Stanford, including as a member of the steering committee of the 100-year study on Artificial Intelligence. He earned D.Phil., M.Sc., and M.A. degrees in AI and robotics, mathematics and computer science from Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a Distinguished Fellow of Stanford’s AI Institute, a Distinguished Research Fellow in Ethics and AI at Oxford, a fellow of DeepMind. He was a visiting scientist at NASA Jet Propulsion Labs, and a faculty exchange fellow at MIT. At Oxford, he was a member of the Programming Research Group, the Robotics Research Lab, and elected a research fellow of Balliol College. JAMES MICKENS is the Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University’s John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. His research focuses on distributed systems, such as large-scale services, and ways to make them more secure. He joined the Distributed Systems group at Microsoft Research in 2009, and Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences in 2015, where he was awarded tenure in 2019. Dr. Mickens received a Ph.D. in computer science and engineering from the University of Michigan in 2008 and his B.S. in computer science from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2001. AMANDA STENT is the inaugural director of Colby College’s David Institute for Artificial Intelligence. Previously, she was the natural language processing architect at Bloomberg L.P. and let the company’s People and Language AI Team. Before that, she was a director of research and principal research scientist at Yahoo Labs, a principal member of technical staff at AT&T Labs-Research, and an associate professor in the Computer Science Department at Stony Brook University. Her research interests center on natural language processing and its applications, in particular topics related to text analytics, discourse, dialog and natural language generation. She is co-editor of the book Natural Language Generation in Interactive Systems (Cambridge University Press), has authored more than 90 papers on natural language processing and is co-inventor on over twenty patents and patent applications. She is president emeritus of the ACL/ISCA Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialog, treasurer of the ACL Special Interest Group PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION 97

on Natural Language Generation and one of the rotating editors of the journal Dialogue and Discourse. She holds a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Rochester. PREPUBLICATION COPY – SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION 98

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With computing technologies increasingly woven into our society and infrastructure, it is vital for the computing research community to be able to address the ethical and societal challenges that can arise from the development of these technologies, from the erosion of personal privacy to the spread of false information.

Fostering Responsible Computing Research: Foundations and Practices presents best practices that funding agencies, academic organizations, and individual researchers can use to formulate and conduct computing research in a responsible manner. This report explores ethical issues in computing research as well as ways to promote responsible practices through education and training.

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