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Suggested Citation:"NAS Council." National Academy of Sciences. 1999. Science and Creationism: A View from the National Academy of Sciences, Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6024.
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Council of the National Academy of Sciences

Bruce Alberts

President

National Academy of Sciences

Washington, DC

Mary Ellen Avery

Professor of Pediatrics

Harvard Medical School

Boston, Massachusetts

Lewis M. Branscomb

Professor Emeritus

John E Kennedy School of Government

Harvard University

Cambridge, Massachusetts

Ralph J. Cicerone

Chancellor

University of California, Irvine

Irvine, California

Marye Anne Fox

Chancellor

North Carolina State University

Raleigh, North Carolina

Ralph E. Gomory

President

Alfred P. Sloan

Foundation

New York, New York

Ronald L. Graham

Chief Scientist

AT&T Labs

Florham Park, New Jersey

Jack Halpern

Louis Block Distinguished Professor Emeritus

Department of Chemistry

The University of Chicago

Chicago, Illinois

David M. Kipnis

Distinguished University Professor

Washington University School of Medicine

Saint Louis, Missouri

Daniel E. Koshland Jr.

Professor in the Graduate School

Department of Molecular and Cellular

Biology University of California, Berkeley

Berkeley, California

Peter Raven

Director

Missouri Botanical Garden

Saint Louis, Missouri

Sherwood E Rowland

Donald Bren Research Professor of Chemistry and Earth System Science

Department of Chemistry

University of California, Irvine

Irvine, California

William J. Rutter

Chairman

Chiron Corporation

Emeryville, California

Luis Sequeira

J.C. Walker Professor Emeritus

Department of Plant Pathology

University of Wisconsin

Madison, Wisconsin

Carla J. Shatz

Investigator

Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Professor

Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology

University of California, Berkeley

Berkeley, California

Jean D. Wilson

Charles Cameron Sprague Distinguished

Chair in Biomedical Science

University of Texas Southwestern

Medical Center

Dallas, Texas

Robert H. Wurtz

Chief

Laboratory of Sensorimotor Research

National Institutes of Health

Bethesda, Maryland

Suggested Citation:"NAS Council." National Academy of Sciences. 1999. Science and Creationism: A View from the National Academy of Sciences, Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6024.
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Science and Creationism: A View from the National Academy of Sciences, Second Edition Get This Book
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While the mechanisms of evolution are still under investigation, scientists universally accept that the cosmos, our planet, and life evolved and continue to evolve. Yet the teaching of evolution to schoolchildren is still contentious.

In Science and Creationism, The National Academy of Sciences states unequivocally that creationism has no place in any science curriculum at any level.

Briefly and clearly, this booklet explores the nature of science, reviews the evidence for the origin of the universe and earth, and explains the current scientific understanding of biological evolution. This edition includes new insights from astronomy and molecular biology.

Attractive in presentation and authoritative in content, Science and Creationism will be useful to anyone concerned about America's scientific literacy: education policymakers, school boards and administrators, curriculum designers, librarians, teachers, parents, and students.

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