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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 1998. Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6217.
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References

1. Artin, M. (1995). Algebra at the college level. In C. Lacampagne (Ed.), Proceedings of algebra initiative colloquium. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.

2. Balanced Assessment Project. For information contact Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.

3. Ball, D. (1994, November). Developing mathematics reform: What don't we know about teacher learning—but would make good working hypotheses. Paper prepared for conference on Teacher Enhancement in Mathematics K-6, Arlington, VA.

4. Barnett, C. et al. (Eds.), Fractions, decimals, ratios, and percents: Hard to teach and hard to learn. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

5. Bryant, D. and Driscoll, M. J. (1998). Exploring classroom assessment in mathematics: A guide for professional development. Reston, VA: NCTM.

6. Clarke, D. J. (1993). Open-ended tasks and assessment: The nettle or the rose. Paper presented at the Research Presession of NCTM's 71st Annual Meeting.

7. Clarke, D. J. and Sullivan, P. A. (1992). The assessment implications of open-ended tasks in mathematics. In M. Stephens and J. Izard (Eds.), Reshaping assessment practices: Assessment in the mathematical sciences under challenge (pp. 161–179). Hawthorn, Australia: Australian Council for Educational Research.

8. Driscoll, M. J. (In preparation). Crafting a sharper lens: Classroom assessment in mathematics. In M. Solomon, The diagnostic teacher: Revitalizing professional development. New York: Teachers College Press.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 1998. Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6217.
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9. Elmore, R. (1996, March). Staff development and instructional improvement: Community District 2, New York City. Paper prepared for the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future.

10. Exemplars, (1995, October). 3(2). (http://www.exemplars.com, 271 Poker Hill Road, Underhill, VT 05489.)

11. Khattri, N. et al. (1995). How performance assessments affect teaching and learning. Educational Leadership, 53(3), 80–83.

12. Lambdin, D. V., Kehle, P. E., and Preston, R. V. (Eds.). (1996). Emphasis on assessment: Readings from NCTM's school-based journals. Reston, VA: NCTM.

13. Lindquist, M. M., Dossey, J. A., and Mullis, I. V. S. (1995). Reaching standards: A progress report on mathematics. Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service.

14. Little, J. W. (1993). Teachers' professional development in a climate of educational reform. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 15(2), 129–151.

15. Loucks-Horsley, S. and Stiegelbauer, S. (1991). Using knowledge of change to guide staff development. In A. Lieberman and L. Miller, Staff development for education in the 90's (pp. 15–36). New York: Teachers College Press.

16. Loucks-Horsley, S., Stiles, K, and Hewson, P. (1996). Principles of effective professional development for mathematics and science education: A synthesis of standards. NISE Brief, 1(1).

17. Miller, B., Lord, B., and Dorney, J. (1994). Staff development for teachers: A study of configurations and costs in four districts . Newton, MA: Education Development Center.

18. National Assessment of Educational Progress. (1983). The Third National Mathematics Assessment: Results, trends, and issues (No. 13-MA-01). Denver, CO: Education Commission of the States.

19. National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics. (1996). Great tasks and more!!: A sourcebook of camera-ready resource on mathematics assessment. Golden, CO: Author.

20. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (1989). Curriculum and evaluation standards for school mathematics. Reston, VA: Author.

21. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (1991). Professional standards or teaching mathematics. Reston, VA: Author.

22. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (1993). Communications handbook. Reston, VA: Author.

23. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (1995). Assessment standards for school mathematics. Reston, VA: Author.

24. National Research Council. (1989). Everybody counts: A report to the nation on the future of mathematics education . Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 1998. Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6217.
×

25. National Research Council. (1991). For good measure. Principles and goals for mathematics assessment. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

26. National Research Council. (1993a). Measuring up: Prototypes for mathematics assessment. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

27. National Research Council. (1993b). Measuring what counts: A conceptual guide for mathematics assessment. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

28. Neill, M. et al. (1995). Implementing performance assessments: A guide to school and system reform. Cambridge, MA: FairTest.

29. New Standards Project. (1995). Mathematics performance standards . Washington, DC: National Center on Education and the Economy.

30. New Standards Project. (1997). The New Standards mathematics reference examinations: Grades 4, 8, and 10. Washington, DC: National Center on Education and the Economy.

31. Petit, M. (1992). Getting started: Vermont mathematics portfolio—learning how to show your best!! Cabot, VT: Cabot School.

32. Regional Educational Laboratory Network Program on Science and Mathematics. (1994). A toolkit for professional developers: Alternative assessment. Portland, OR: Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory.

33. Schifter, D. and Fosnot, C. (1993). Reconstructing mathematics education. New York: Teachers College Press.

34. Silver, E. A., Shapiro, L. J., and Deutsch, A. (1993). Sense making and the solution of division problems involving remainders: An examination of middle school students' solution processes and their interpretations of solutions. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 24(2), 117–135.

35. Stenmark, J. (Ed.). (1991). Mathematics assessment: Myths, models, good questions, and practical suggestions. Reston: NCTM.

36. Stiggins, R. (1988). Make sure your teachers understand student assessment. Executive Educator, 10(8), 24–30.

37. Thorpe, J. A. (1989). Algebra: What should we teach and how should we teach it? In S. Wagner and C. Kieren (Eds.), Research issues in the learning and teaching of algebra (pp. 11–24). Reston: NCTM.

38. Tsuruda, G. (1994). Putting it together: Middle school math in transition. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

39. Van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, M. (1994). Improvement of (didactical) assessment by improvement of problems: An attempt with respect to percentage. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 27(4), 341–373.

40. Webb, N (Ed.). (1993). Assessment in the mathematics classroom: 1993 yearbook. Reston: NCTM.

41. Webb, N. (1997). Criteria for alignment of expectations and assessments in mathematics and science education. Madison, WI: National Institute for Science Education.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 1998. Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6217.
×

42. Wilson, L. (Ed.). (1995). Implementing the Assessment standards or school mathematics. Mathematics Teacher (a series beginning in 1995).

43. Wu, H. (1994). The role of open-ended problems in mathematics education. Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 13(1), 115–128.

Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 1998. Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6217.
×
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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 1998. Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6217.
×
Page48
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 1998. Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6217.
×
Page49
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 1998. Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6217.
×
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The MSEB, with generous support and encouragement from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, seeks to bring discussion of assessment to school-and district-based practitioners through an initiative called Assessment in Practice (AIP). Originally conceived as a series of "next steps" to follow the publication of Measuring Up and For Good Measure, the project, with assistance from an advisory board, developed a publication agenda to provide support to teachers and others directly involved with the teaching and assessment of children in mathematics classrooms at the elementary, middle, and high school levels.

In a series of three booklets, AIP presents an exploration of issues in assessment. The first booklet, Learning About Assessment, Learning Through Assessment discusses ways to assist teachers in learning about assessment and how student work can be a rich resource in professional development. The second, Assessment in Support of Instruction, makes a case for aligning assessments with state and district curriculum frameworks and examines ways in which states have shifted their curriculum frameworks and related state assessment programs to reflect the NCTM Standards and other perspectives. The third booklet, Keeping Score, discusses issues to be considered while developing high quality mathematics assessments. This series is specifically designed to be used at the school and school district level by teachers, principals, supervisors, and measurement specialists.

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