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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Statement of Task." National Research Council. 2000. Engineering Challenges to the Long-Term Operation of the International Space Station. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9794.
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Page 31
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Statement of Task." National Research Council. 2000. Engineering Challenges to the Long-Term Operation of the International Space Station. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9794.
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Page 32
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Statement of Task." National Research Council. 2000. Engineering Challenges to the Long-Term Operation of the International Space Station. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9794.
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Page 33

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Appendixes

Kelley, J. 1999. Personal communication from J. Kelley, Lockheed Missiles and Space Systems, to B. Bumpkin, member of the Committee on the Engineering Challenges to the Long-Tenn Operation of the International Space Station, January 7, 1999. Window, K. 1999. Presentation by K. Window, Avio~ucs and Software Office, International Space Station Program Office, to the Committee on the Engineering Challenges to the Long-Term Operation of the International Space Station, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, March 24' 1999. Styczynski, T. 1999. Personal communication from T. Styczynski, Lockheed-Martin Hubble Space Telescope Operations, to H. Hecht, member of the Committee on the Engineering Challenges to the I=ong-Term Operation of the Interrmtional Space Station, January 20, 1999. Wolf, K. 1999. Launch Package and Stage Assistance Program. Presentation by K. Wolf, the Boeing Company, to the Committee on the Engineering Challenges to the Long-Term Operation of the International Space Station, NASA Johnson Space Center' Houston, Texas' March 25, 1999. 32

Appendix A Statement of Task The study will assess the potential effect of long-term operational engineering issues on the budget and capabili- ties of the International Space Station (ISS) and, where appropriate, recommend procedures and hardware upgrades to mitigate their impact. The study will focus on the follow . . ng Issues: 1. Long-term ISS maintenance requirements. 2. Extravehicular activity (EVA) requirements to support ISS operations and maintenance (in light of experi- ence with the Mir space station). 33 3. The use of an international fleet of launch vehicles to support the ISS. 4. The need for and capability to upgrade and replace ISS equipment and components after the station's assembly is complete. This includes the need to replace laboratory equipment as it becomes obsolete. 5. Decommissioning and disassembly of the station at the end of its useful life.

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The International Space Station (ISS) is truly an international undertaking. The project is being led by the United States, with the participation of Japan, the European Space Agency, Canada, Italy, Russia, and Brazil. Russia is participating in full partnership with the United States in the fabrication of ISS modules, the assembly of ISS elements on orbit, and, after assembly has been completed, the day-to-day operation of the station. Construction of the ISS began with the launch of the Russian Zarya module in November 1998 followed by the launch of the U.S. Unity module in December 1998. The two modules were mated and interconnected by the crew of the Space Shuttle during the December flight, and the first assembled element of the ISS was in place. Construction will continue with the delivery of components and assembly on orbit through a series of 46 planned flights. During the study period, the Assembly Complete milestone was scheduled for November 2004 with the final ISS construction flight delivering the U.S. Habitation Module.

Engineering Challenges to the Long-Term Operation of the International Space Station is a study of the engineering challenges posed by longterm operation of the ISS. This report states that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the ISS developers have focused almost totally on completing the design and development of the station and completing its assembly in orbit. This report addresses the issues and opportunities related to long-term operations.

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