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Pages 146-157

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From page 146...
... it 4:30 j43 Synthesis and Concluding Remarks by the ~ ~ .
From page 147...
... APPENDIX D Keynote Speech: Networked Communities and the Laws of Cyberspace Edward Markey Chairman, House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and Finance As many of you are aware, we are in a time of transition. As of last night, the Clinton administration has begun the political transition from 12 years of Republican economic policies, launching the nationally televised "airwave" assault of Operation Shared Sacrifice with an address to Congress.
From page 148...
... education by linking resources and students, rich and poor, urban and rural, and by giving everyone access to the Information Age. · In manufacturing, the agile techniques that telecommunications-conversant CEOs employ could mean that the "virtual corporation" may help Bill Clinton achieve a "virtual economic recovery."
From page 149...
... Moreover, they are also people who understand the "small-D" democratic potential of these new information networks and place more importance, I believe, on some of the basic principles of personal privacy that we should all be vigilant in protecting. We've gone from a president who didn't know about grocery scanners to one who not only knows what a "PBX" is, but knows the capacity of the one in the White House and is unhappy with it!
From page 150...
... APPENDIX D 149 ter coffeehouses before it would be a top vote-getter in the New Hampshire primary.) What happens in cyberspace, and what its popular emergence portends for our society, is what I'd like to talk about tonight.
From page 151...
... 50 APPENDIX D Koestler's almost visceral defense of distinctly human qualities of emotion and judgment foreshadow some of what we may encounter when trying to understand the dual nature of cyberspace both the mechanical and human aspects of it. Because it is a human creation it will embody all of the eccentricities, judgment, reason, sense, and dreams we consist of ourselves along with our flaws, weaknesses, and prejudices.
From page 152...
... The GAO study also indicated that the government obtains information electronically from third-party sources. Twenty percent of the agencies surveyed reported that they collected personal information electronically from third-party sources, such as credit bureaus, state divisions of motor vehicles, and insurance companies.
From page 153...
... Let me get away from the government's side of cyberspace to some of the threats to personal privacy as they arrive from the private sector or from private individuals. First, private industry.
From page 154...
... It requires that recipients of personal information gleaned from the network during an 800 or 900 call NOT reuse or sell that information without receiving the affirmative consent of the caller first. I'd like to read you a short excerpt from another book, this one by Jeffrey Rothfeder, called Privacy for Sale.
From page 155...
... It is a fundamental question for us. As a policymaker at the federal level, I will be holding hearings on these issues, especially the electronic consequences to personal privacy in the Information Age.
From page 156...
... " · Or will cyberspace develop its own distinct laws? Will it develop "digital vigilantes" to patrol and police the electronic bulletin boards and electronic highways?
From page 157...
... 56 APPENDIX D appear to walk through life with blinders on failing to see the larger forces at work or the proverbial "big picture." Similarly, there are numerous "geniuses" in the telecommunications or computer arenaself-described futurists and others who appear to me to walk through life with binoculars on. They can see way out into the distance, yet anything in the immediate future is completely out of focus.


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