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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
×

Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges

Panel on Research on Future Census Methods

Daniel L. Cork, Michael L. Cohen, and Benjamin F. King, Editors

Committee on National Statistics

Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS
Washington, D.C.
www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS
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NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance.

The project that is the subject of this report was supported by contract no. 50-YABC-8-66016 between the National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. Census Bureau. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the project.

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Suggested citation: National Research Council (2004). Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Panel on Research on Future Census Methods. Daniel L. Cork, Michael L. Cohen, and Benjamin F. King, eds. Committee on National Statistics, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
×

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The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Bruce M. Alberts and Dr. Wm. A. Wulf are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council.

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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
×

PANEL ON RESEARCH ON FUTURE CENSUS METHODS

BENJAMIN F. KING (Chair),

Delray Beach, Florida

DAVID A. BINDER,

Methodology Branch, Statistics Canada, Ottawa

MICK P. COUPER,

Survey Research Center, University of Michigan, and Joint Program in Survey Methodology, University of Maryland

C.A. IRVINE,

San Diego, California

WILLIAM KALSBEEK,*

Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

SALLIE KELLER-MCNULTY,

Statistical Sciences Group, Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, New Mexico

GEORGE T. LIGLER,

Potomac, Maryland

MICHAEL M. MEYER,

Intelligent Results, Inc., Seattle, Washington

DARYL PREGIBON,**

Google, New York City

KEITH F. RUST,

Westat, Inc., Rockville, Maryland

JOSEPH J. SALVO,

Population Division, Department of City Planning, New York City

JOSEPH L. SCHAFER,

Department of Statistics, Pennsylvania State University

ALLEN L. SCHIRM,

Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., Washington, DC

JOSEPH H. SEDRANSK,

Department of Statistics, Case Western Reserve University

C. MATTHEW SNIPP,

Department of Sociology, Stanford University

DONALD YLVISAKER,

Department of Statistics, University of California, Los Angeles

ALAN M. ZASLAVSKY,

Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School

MICHAEL L. COHEN, Study Director

DANIEL L. CORK, Study Director

SHOREH ELHAMI, Consultant

AGNES E. GASKIN, Senior Project Assistant

*  

Served until March 2002

**  

Served until March 2001

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
×

COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL STATISTICS 2004

JOHN E. ROLPH (Chair),

Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California

JOSEPH G. ALTONJI,

Department of Economics, Yale University

ROBERT M. BELL,

AT&T Labs—Research, Florham Park, New Jersey

LAWRENCE D. BROWN,

Department of Statistics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

ROBERT M. GROVES,

Survey Research Center, University of Michigan, and Joint Program in Survey Methodology, University of Maryland

JOHN C. HALTIWANGER,

Department of Economics, University of Maryland

PAUL W. HOLLAND,

Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey

JOEL L. HOROWITZ,

Department of Economics, Northwestern University

WILLIAM KALSBEEK,

Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

ARLEEN LEIBOWITZ,

School of Public Policy and Social Research, University of California, Los Angeles

VIJAYAN NAIR,

Department of Statistics and Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan

DARYL PREGIBON,

Google, New York City

KENNETH PREWITT,

School of Public Affairs, Columbia University

NORA CATE SCHAEFFER,

Department of Sociology, University of Wisconsin, Madison

JAMES F. HINCHMAN, Acting Director

CONSTANCE F. CITRO, Acting Chief of Staff

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
×

Acknowledgments

THE PANEL ON RESEARCH ON FUTURE CENSUS METHODS of the Committee on National Statistics is pleased to submit this final report and wishes to thank the many people who have contributed to our work over the panel’s lifetime.

We thank the staff of the U.S. Census Bureau, under the leadership of director C. Louis Kincannon, deputy director Hermann Habermann, former director Kenneth Prewitt, and former acting director William Barron, for their interactions with the panel. In particular, we appreciate the efforts of Preston Jay Waite, associate director for decennial census. Rajendra Singh, the panel’s lead liaison with the Census Bureau, and Philip Gbur provided useful assistance. In plenary sessions and in smaller working group activities, the panel has also benefited from its interaction with other talented members of the Census Bureau staff, including Teresa Angueira, Andrea Brinson, Jon Clark, Dave Galdi, Nancy Gordon, Edison Gore, Joan Hill, Howard Hogan, Arnold Jackson, Dean Judson, Ruth Ann Killion, Joe Knott, Donna Kostanich, Juanita Lott, Robert Marx, Fay Nash, Alfredo Navarro, Sally Obenski, Ed Pike, Linda Pike, Jim Treat, Alan Tupek, Carol Van Horn, Frank Vitrano, and Tracy Wessler.

The tragic death of Charles H. “Chip” Alexander, Jr., in early September 2002 was an incalculable loss for the entire research community surrounding the decennial census and its related programs. The chief statistical methodologist for the American Community Survey (ACS), Chip was also the panel’s designated

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liaison on ACS matters. One true pleasure of service on this panel was the opportunity for interaction with someone of Chip’s great knowledge and good humor, and we join his friends and colleagues in mourning his loss.

Our panel colleague Joseph Salvo, of the New York City Department of City Planning, ably chaired a working group to evaluate the Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) program from the local government perspective. Jointly sponsored by this panel and our sister panel, the Panel to Review the 2000 Census, LUCA working group members drew from their firsthand expertise in documenting their LUCA experience in case study form. We thank the members of this group—Shoreh Elhami, Abby Hughes, Terry Jackson, Tim Koss, and Harry Wolfe—and working group consultant Patricia Becker for their efforts, a solid reference work for our panel and the entire research community.

In particular, we have benefited greatly from the continuing consultation of LUCA working group member Shoreh Elhami, of the Delaware County (Ohio) Auditor’s Office. A current member of the National Research Council’s Mapping Science Committee, her expertise on census and geography matters from the local government perspective has enriched our discussions of the Census Bureau’s plans to modernize their geographic resources.

In April 2001 the panel opened its first examination of the proposed MAF/TIGER Enhancements Program by inviting a distinguished set of discussants to share their opinions on the proposed plans. In addition to Shoreh Elhami, this roster of discussants included Rick Ayers (Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc.), Donald Cooke (Geographic Data Technology, Inc.), Michel Lettre (State of Maryland), and Sarah Nusser (Department of Statistics, Iowa State University). We thank them for their time and their talents.

At the request of the Census Bureau, panel staff organized a meeting on September 10, 2003, dealing specifically with the Census Bureau’s plans to redesign the database structure for its geographic resources (Master Address File and TIGER geographic database). Conducted by the Census Bureau, the meeting supplemented expertise on the panel with additional experts in computer science, software engineering, and geogra-

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
×

phy. Panel members Al Irvine and Mike Meyer participated in the meeting; we thank invitees Michael Goodchild (University of California, Santa Barbara), Les Miller (Iowa State University and American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation Census Fellow), Jesse Poore (University of Tennessee), and Allan Wilks (AT&T Laboratories–Research) for their participation and discussion.

We are grateful to our colleagues on the companion Panel to Review the 2000 Census and to its chair, Janet Norwood, for their assistance and contributions over the course of the panel’s study. Members of our panel joined members and staff of the Norwood panel to visit local and regional census offices during the 2000 census. Since those early days, both panels have been continually updated on each other’s progress. In particular, the Norwood panel’s detailed discussion of the 2000 Accuracy and Coverage Evaluation and the possible statistical adjustment of the 2000 census figures has been most helpful to us in suggesting priorities for coverage measurement in 2010.

Over the years, the panel has greatly benefited from good relations and insightful interaction with the broader census community. Terri Ann Lowenthal’s “Census 2000 News Briefs” have been a most helpful resource and an important communications channel, and we appreciate her efforts. We have learned much from our discussions with relevant staff of the U.S. House Subcommittee on the Census of the Committee on Government Reform (and its successor subcommittees with census oversight authority), particularly David McMillen and former subcommittee staffer Michael Miguel. We have appreciated our interaction with census-related staff of the U.S. General Accounting Office, including Robert Parker and Ty Mitchell. We also thank Ed Spar of the Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics and Susan Schechter and Katherine Wallman of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget for their participation in panel meetings.

Logistical arrangements for panel activities were made with great skill by Agnes Gaskin, senior project assistant. Research assistant Marisa Gerstein deserves thanks for her help with maintaining an archive of materials related to both this panel and the Panel to Review the 2000 Census. Former CNSTAT staff mem-

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
×

ber Carrie Muntean, now stationed with the U.S. Foreign Service, did exemplary work for both panels and, in particular, with the LUCA working group. CNSTAT consultant Meyer Zitter’s enthusiasm in collecting information for both panels is greatly appreciated. Cameron Fletcher, associate editor, and Christine McShane, senior editor of the reports office of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, contributed to this report with fine technical editing. Finally, virtually all of the activities of the Committee on National Statistics benefit greatly from the involvement and advice of Constance Citro, senior program officer. Given her role as study director of the Panel to Review the 2000 Census, we have drawn quite heavily on her wisdom and benefited from her contributions.

Finally, I represent the whole panel in expressing our gratitude to Daniel Cork and to Michael Cohen, the codirectors of this study, for their invaluable assistance in all aspects of our work. Neither this report nor the interim and letter reports that have preceded it would have been possible without their excellent liaison activities with the Census Bureau, their able handling of the logistics of our meetings, their up-to-date reporting to distant panel members of all developments in the Census Bureau’s planning for 2010, and their translation into readable prose of our reactions to and recommendations for the process as it has unfolded. Personally, it has been a great pleasure to work with them.

This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the Report Review Committee of the National Research Council (NRC). The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making the published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process.

We thank the following individuals for their participation in the review of this report: Barbara A. Bailar, statistical consultant, Washington, DC; Barbara Everitt Bryant, University of

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
×

Michigan Business School; Don A. Dillman, Departments of Sociology and Community Rural Sociology and Social Economic Sciences Research Center, Washington State University; Michael Hout, Department of Sociology, University of California, Berkeley; Janet Norwood, consultant, Chevy Chase, MD; and Halliman H. Winsborough, Department of Sociology and Center for Demography and Ecology, University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Although the reviewers listed above provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of the report was overseen by Robert Hauser, Center for Demography, University of Wisconsin–Madison. Appointed by the National Research Council, he was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of the report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring panel and the institution.

Benjamin F. King, Chair

Panel on Research on Future Census Methods

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
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2–C.1   Relation of the 2010 Plan to Basic Census Processes

 

39

   

2–C.2   Relation of the 2010 Plan to the 2000 Census

 

40

   

2–C.3   Planning Milestones of the 2010 Census

 

41

   

2–C.4   Status of the 2010 Census Plan

 

42

   

Table 2-1:   Planned Testing and Development Cycle for the 2010 Decennial Census, Assuming a Short-Form-Only Census

 

43

   

2–D   Reengineering The 2010 Census: A Process At Risk

 

44

   

Table 2-2:   Census Bureau Listing of Perceived Risks in 2010 Census Planning

 

47

   

2–D.1   Specific Risk Areas

 

48

   

2–D.2   Mitigating the Risks

 

53

II    Issues of Census Design

 

55

3

 

Modernizing Geographic Resources

 

57

   

3–A   Development and Current State of the MAF and TIGER

 

59

   

3–A.1   The Master Address File

 

59

   

Box 3.1:   Results of LUCA Working Group Study

 

64

   

3–A.2   The TIGER Database

 

66

   

3–B   The MAF/TIGER Enhancements Program

 

71

   

3–B.1   Objective One: Address/Street Location Accuracy

 

72

   

3–B.2   Objective Two: Modern Processing Environment

 

75

   

3–B.3   Objective Three: Geographic Partnerships

 

76

   

3–B.4   Objective Four: Community Address Updating System

 

76

   

3–B.5   Objective Five: Evaluation and Quality Metrics

 

77

   

3–B.6   Update on Enhancements Program Progress

 

78

   

3–C   Assessment of Geographic Modernization Efforts

 

79

   

3–C.1   Locational Accuracy of TIGER

 

79

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
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3–C.2   Balance of the MAF/TIGER Enhancements Program

 

83

   

3–D   Weakness: Enhancing the MAF

 

84

   

3–D.1   Current Plans for MAF Updates for 2010

 

84

   

3–D.2   Block Canvassing

 

87

   

3–D.3   Conclusions

 

88

   

3–E   Recommendations

 

90

   

3–E.1   Plan MAF Improvements Independent of MAF/TIGER Enhancements

 

90

   

3–E.2   Coordinate Responsibility for the MAF

 

92

   

3–E.3   Improve Research on the Delivery Sequence File

 

93

   

3–E.4   Define the Role of the Community Address Updating System

 

93

   

3–E.5   Plan Local Geographic Partnerships and Implement Early

 

94

   

3–E.6   Justify the Complete Block Canvass

 

97

   

3–E.7   Exploit 2000 MAF Data, and Redesign MAF for Evaluation in 2010

 

99

4

 

American Community Survey

 

103

   

4–A   Background and Current Plans

 

105

   

4–A.1   Test Sites and the Census 2000 Supplementary Survey

 

105

   

4–A.2   Current ACS Implementation Plans

 

106

   

4–B   Assessing the ACS

 

108

   

4–C   Estimation Using the ACS

 

109

   

4–C.1   Adequacy of Moving Averages as Point Estimates

 

109

   

4–C.2   Comparing ACS/C2SS to the Census Long Form

 

111

   

4–D   Quality of ACS Estimates

 

112

   

4–D.1   Estimating Nonresponse

 

113

   

Table 4-1:   Imputation Rates for Selected Long-Form Items, 2000 Long-Form Sample and Census 2000 Supplemental Survey, by Type of Response, Household Population (weighted)

 

116

   

4–D.2   Quality of Imputed Responses

 

117

   

4–D.3   Measurement Error

 

118

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
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4–E   Summary and Assessment

 

119

   

4–E.1   Benefits and Costs

 

119

   

4–E.2   ACS Funding

 

125

   

4–E.3   Contingency Planning

 

127

   

4–F   Topics for Further Research and Design Consideration

 

128

   

4–F.1   Group Quarters

 

128

   

4–F.2   Voluntary versus Mandatory Response

 

129

   

4–F.3   ACS as Both a Census Process and a Federal Survey

 

130

   

4–F.4   Revisiting Sampling Strategies

 

132

   

4–F.5   Interaction with Intercensal Population Estimates and Demographic Analysis Programs

 

134

   

4–F.6   Research on General Estimation Issues

 

136

5

 

Enumeration and Data-Processing Methods

 

139

   

5–A   Portable Computing Devices

 

140

   

5–A.1   Testing PCDs: Pretests and the 2004 Census Test

 

142

   

5–A.2   Assessment

 

144

   

5–B   Challenging Definitions for a Modern Census

 

149

   

5–B.1   Housing Units

 

149

   

5–B.2   Group Quarters

 

150

   

5–B.3   Residence and Residence Rules

 

153

   

5–B.4   Wording and Format of Race and Hispanic Origin Questions

 

153

   

5–C   Hard-to-Count Population Groups: Extremes of Urbanicity

 

156

   

5–C.1   Small Multiunit Structures and Immigrant Communities

 

157

   

5–C.2   Rural Enumeration

 

159

   

5–D   Alternative Response Modes and Contact Strategies

 

160

   

5–D.1   Response Modes in 2000 and Early 2010 Testing

 

161

   

5–D.2   Response Mode Effects

 

163

   

5–D.3   Replacement Questionnaires

 

164

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5–E   Data-Processing Methodologies: Unduplication and Imputation

 

165

6

 

Technical Infrastructure and Business Process

 

169

   

6–A   Toward a “Business Process” of the Decennial Census

 

172

   

6–A.1   Baseline: Logical Architecture of the 2000 Census

 

173

   

6–A.2   Reengineering Exercise

 

176

   

6–A.3   After the Pilot: Steps Toward an Architecture

 

177

   

6–B   Assessment

 

177

   

6–B.1   The Need for Institutional Commitment

 

178

   

6–B.2   Management “Champions”

 

179

   

6–B.3   Establishing a System Architect

 

180

   

6–B.4   Cautionary Note: Breadth and Difficulty of Task

 

181

   

6–C   The Architecture of Crucial Subsystems: The TIGER Redesign

 

183

   

6–D   Challenges in Transition from Logical to Physical Infrastructure

 

188

   

6–D.1   Potential Pitfall: Locking in Physical Infrastructure Too Early

 

188

   

6–D.2   Enterprise Architecture as Learning Tool and Guide to Organizational Change

 

189

   

6–D.3   Changing Architecture and Methods Simultaneously

 

190

   

6–D.4   Improving Software Engineering and Development

 

191

7

 

Coverage Measurement

 

193

   

7–A   The Shape of Coverage Measurement in 2010

 

194

   

7–B   Enhancing Demographic Analysis for 2010

 

196

   

7–C   Enhancing Administrative Records Analysis for 2010

 

199

   

7–C.1   Administrative Records Experiment in the 2000 Census

 

199

   

7–C.2   Administrative Records for 2010

 

202

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
×

Acronyms and Abbreviations


ACE

Accuracy and Coverage Evaluation

ACF

Address Control File

ACS

American Community Survey

ALMI

Automated Listing and Mapping Instrument

AREX 2000

Administrative Records Experiment (2000)


BAS

Boundary and Annexation Survey

BSA

basic street address

C2SS

Census 2000 Supplementary Survey


CAI

computer-assisted interviewing

CAPI

computer-assisted personal interviewing

CATI

computer-assisted telephone interviewing

CAUS

Community Address Updating System

CEFU

coverage edit follow-up

CIFU

coverage improvement follow-up

CIO

chief information officer

CMM

Capability Maturity Model

CNSTAT

Committee on National Statistics

COTS

commercial off-the-shelf

CPS

Current Population Survey


DADS

Data Access and Dissemination System

DCS 2000

Data Capture System 2000

DEX

Digital Exchange

DMAF

Decennial Master Address File

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
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DSE

dual-systems estimation

DSF

Delivery Sequence File


ESCAP

Executive Steering Committee on ACE Policy


FEAF

Federal Enterprise Architecture Framework

FIPS

Federal Information Processing Standards


GAO

U.S. General Accounting Office

GBF/DIME

Geographic Base File/Dual Independent Map Encoding

GIS

geographic information systems

GPS

global positioning system

GQ

group quarters

GSS

Geographic Support System


ICM

Integrated Coverage Measurement

IDC/IQA

Internet Data Collection/Internet Questionnaire Assistance

IDEF0

Integration Definition for Function Modeling

IRS

Internal Revenue Service

IT

information technology

IVR

interactive voice response


LCO

local census office

LUCA

Local Update of Census Addresses


MAF

Master Address File

MAF/TIGER

Master Address File/Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing System

MAFGOR

MAF Geocoding Office Resolution

MaRCS

Matching and Review Coding System

MCD

minor civil division; mobile computing device (Census Bureau usage)

MIS 2000

Management Information System 2000

MTAIP

MAF/TIGER Accuracy Improvement Project

MTEP

MAF/TIGER Enhancements Program


NCT

National Census Test (2003)

NRC

National Research Council

NRFU

nonresponse follow-up


OCR

optical character recognition

OCS

2000 Operations Control System 2000

OIG

Office of Inspector General (U.S. Department of Commerce)

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10959.
×

OMB

Office of Management and Budget

OMR

optical mark recognition


PALS

Program for Address List Supplementation

PAMS/ADAMS

Pre-Appointment Management System/Automated Decennial Administrative Management System

PCD

portable computing device

PDA

personal digital assistant

PES

postenumeration survey

PRED

Planning, Research, and Evaluation Division (U.S. Census Bureau)

PSA

primary selection algorithm


RFP

request for proposals

RMIE

Response Mode and Incentive Experiment


SIPP

Survey of Income and Program Participation

SNRFU

sampling for nonresponse follow-up

StARS

Statistical Administrative Records System


TEA

type of enumeration area

TIGER

Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing System

TMU

Targeted Map Update

TQA/CEFU

Telephone Questionnaire Assistance/Coverage Edit Follow-Up


USGS

United States Geological Survey

USPS

United States Postal Service

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Reengineering the 2010 Census: Risks and Challenges Get This Book
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At the request of the U.S. Census Bureau, the National Research Council’s Committee on National Statistics established the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods to review the early planning process for the 2010 census. This new report documents the panel’s strong support for the major aims of the Census Bureau’s emerging plan for 2010. At the same time, it notes the considerable challenges that must be overcome if the bureau’s innovations are to be successful. The panel agrees with the Census Bureau that implementation of the American Community Survey and, with it, the separation of the long form from the census process are excellent concepts. Moreover, it concurs that the critically important Master Address File and TIGER geographic systems are in dire need of comprehensive updating and that new technologies have the potential to improve the accuracy of the count. The report identifies the risks and rewards of these and other components of the Census Bureau’s plan. The report emphasizes the need for the bureau to link its research and evaluation efforts much more closely to operational planning and the importance of funding for a comprehensive and rigorous testing program before 2010.

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