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Review of DOE's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program (2008)

Chapter:Appendix C: Biographical Sketches for Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches for Committee Members." National Research Council. 2008. Review of DOE's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11998.
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C
Biographical Sketches for Committee Members

Robert W. Fri, Chair, is a visiting scholar and senior fellow emeritus at Resources for the Future, where he served as president from 1986 to 1995. From 1996 to 2001 he served as director of the National Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian Institution. Before joining the Smithsonian, Mr. Fri served in both the public and private sectors, specializing in energy and environmental issues. In 1971 he became the first deputy administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 1975, President Ford appointed him as the deputy administrator of the Energy Research and Development Administration. He served as acting administrator of both agencies for extended periods. From 1978 to 1986, Mr. Fri headed his own company, Energy Transition Corporation. He began his career with McKinsey & Company, where he was elected a principal. Mr. Fri is a senior advisor to private, public, and nonprofit organizations. He is a director of the American Electric Power Company and of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and a trustee of Science Service, Inc. (publisher of Science News and organizer of the Intel Science Talent Search and International Science and Engineering Fair). He serves as vice-chair of the boards of EPRI and of Science Service. He is a member of the National Petroleum Council, the Advisory Council of the Marian E. Koshland Science Museum, and the steering committee of the Energy Future Coalition. In past years, he has been a member of the President’s Commission on Environmental Quality, the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, and the University of Chicago board of governors for Argonne National Laboratory. He has chaired advisory committees of the National Research Council (NRC), the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology and Government, EPRI, and the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA). From 1978 to 1995 he was a director of Transco Energy Company, where he served as chair of the audit, compensation, and chief executive search committees. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi and a national associate of the National Academy of Sciences. He received a B.A. in physics from Rice University and an M.B.A. (with distinction) from Harvard University.


R. Stephen Berry (NAS) is the James Franck Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at the University of Chicago and holds appointments in the College, the James Franck Institute, and the Department of Chemistry. He was special advisor to the director of Argonne National Laboratory for National Security. Dr. Berry has also held an appointment in the School of Public Policy Studies at the university and has worked on a variety of subjects ranging from strictly scientific matters to a variety of topics in policy. He has held a number of positions including visiting professor at the University of Copenhagen (1967 and 1979), the Université de Paris-Sud (1979-1980), and Oxford University (1973-1974, 1980), where he was the Newton-Abraham Professor in 1986-1987. He spent 1994 at the Freie Universität Berlin as an awardee of the Humboldt Prize. He has continued to have close associations with the Aspen Center for Physics (board of directors, 1978-1984) and with the Telluride Summer Research Center (now Telluride Science Research Center) (board of directors, 1984-present; president, 1989-1993). In 1983 Dr. Berry was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. In 1997, he received the Heyrovsky Medal of the Czech Academy of Sciences. He has also worked since the mid-1970s with issues of science and the law, and with the management of scientific data, activities that have brought him into the arena of electronic media for scientific information and issues of intellectual property in that context. He has also worked on matters of scientific ethics and on some aspects of national security. Dr. Berry’s current scientific interests include the dynamics of atomic and molecular clusters, the basis of guided protein folding and other structure-seeking processes, and the thermodynamics of time-constrained processes and the efficient use of energy. He attended Harvard University, where he received A.B., A.M., and Ph.D. degrees.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches for Committee Members." National Research Council. 2008. Review of DOE's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11998.
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Douglas M. Chapin (NAE) is principal officer and director, MPR Associates, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia. He has extensive experience in electrical, chemical, and nuclear engineering, with particular application to nuclear and conventional power plant problems and functions, including numerous aspects of power plant systems and their associated components. He has worked in instrumentation and control systems, nuclear fuels, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, pumps, advanced analysis methods, test facility design, and electrical systems and components. Dr. Chapin has been involved in a number of efforts, including the Japan/Germany/United States research program on loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs), served as project leader for the design, construction, and testing of the loss of fluid test (LOFT) facility, was a member of EPRI’s Utility Review Committee on Advanced Reactor Designs, and worked with the Utility/EPRI Advanced Light Water Reactor Program, which defined utility requirements for future nuclear power plants. He was chairman of the NRC’s Committee on Application of Digital Instrumentation and Control Technology to Nuclear Power Plant Operations and Safety, and is chair of its Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. Dr. Chapin is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), has served as a member of its Electric Power/Energy Systems Engineering Peer Committee, and is currently a member of its Committee on Membership. He is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). He has a B.S. in electrical engineering, Duke University, an M.S. in applied science, George Washington University, and a Ph.D., nuclear studies in chemical engineering, Princeton University.


Gregory R. Choppin is currently the Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Florida State University. His research interests involve the chemistry and separation of the f-elements and the physical chemistry of concentrated electrolyte solutions. During a postdoctoral period at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, he participated in the discovery of mendelevium, element 101. His research and educational activities have been recognized by the American Chemical Society’s Award in Nuclear Chemistry, the Southern Chemist Award of the American Chemical Society, the Manufacturing Chemist Award in Chemical Education, the Chemical Pioneer Award of the American Institute of Chemistry, a Presidential Citation Award of the ANS, the Becquerel Medal of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Hevesy Award in Radiochemistry (Hungary), and honorary D.Sc. degrees from Loyola University and the Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden). He has served on numerous advisory groups and NRC committees on separations chemistry, nuclear fuel, and nuclear waste. He has served on over a dozen NRC committees and boards, including the Panel on Separations Technology and Transmutation Systems, the Committee on Electrometallurgical Techniques for DOE Spent Fuel, the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, and the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. He holds a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from the University of Texas, Austin.


Michael Corradini (NAE) is chairperson and professor in the Department of Engineering Physics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Corradini’s research focus is nuclear engineering and multiphase flow with specific interests that include light water reactor safety, fusion reactor design and safety, waste management and disposal, vapor explosions research and molten core concrete interaction research, and energy policy analysis. He is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the American Society of Engineering Education, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and a fellow of the ANS. Dr. Corradini has received numerous awards, including the National Science Foundation’s Presidential Young Investigators Award, the ANS reactor safety best paper award, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus teaching award. He is the author of over 100 technical papers and has served on various technical review committees, including the research review panel of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and the direct heating review group. He is currently a member of the NRC’s Electric Power/Energy Systems Engineering Peer Committee and chair of the Frontiers of Engineering organizing committee. He has served on several NRC committees, including the Committee on Alternatives for Controlling the Release of Solid Materials from NuRC-Licensed Facilities. Dr. Corradini was elected to the NAE in 1998. He received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Marquette University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).


James R. Curtiss is a partner in the Winston & Strawn, Washington, D.C., office and chairs the firm’s energy practice. He was a commissioner of the USNRC (1988-1993); counsel to the Subcommittee on Nuclear Regulation of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, working for the committee’s Republicans; and a lawyer in the office of the executive legal director of the USNRC and a legal assistant for then-Commissioner Richard T. Kennedy. He concentrates his practice in energy policy and nuclear regulatory law and focuses on strategic advice and counsel for utilities, nuclear fuel cycle companies, government contractors, and trade associations on regulatory and legislative matters, including corporate governance, industry restructuring, and legislative and regulatory energy policy issues. He has extensive experience in regulatory and licensing policy as well as in the drafting and enactment of many key pieces of legislation, having been involved in establishing regulatory policy for all civilian uses of nuclear materials, including commercial nuclear power plants, industrial users, universities, and hospitals, as well as the formulation of the Part 52 framework for certification of nuclear plant designs, early site permits, combined licenses, and nuclear waste policy. He

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches for Committee Members." National Research Council. 2008. Review of DOE's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11998.
×

serves as a member of the boards of directors of Constellation Energy Group, where he chairs the board’s Nuclear Committee, and Cameco Corporation, where he chairs the board’s Human Resources and Compensation Committee and is a member of the Safety, Health, and Environment Committee. In addition, Mr. Curtiss is on the Nuclear Oversight Board for Southern California Edison’s San Onofre Nuclear Generation Station. Mr. Curtiss received a B.A. and a J.D., with distinction, from the University of Nebraska, where he served on the Law Review. Mr. Curtiss is a member of the bar of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals and the United States Supreme Court.


James W. Dally (NAE) is professor emeritus, University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Dally has had a distinguished career in industry, government, and academia and is the former dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Rhode Island. Dr. Dally is Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering (emeritus) at the University of Maryland at College Park. His former positions include senior research engineer, Armour Research Foundation; assistant director research, Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute; and senior engineer, International Business Machines Corporation. Currently, he is also an independent consultant. Dr. Dally is a mechanical engineer and the author or coauthor of six books, including engineering textbooks on experimental stress analysis, engineering design, instrumentation, and the packaging of electronic systems, and has published approximately 200 research papers. He has served on a number of NRC committees, such as the Committee on Alternatives for Controlling the Release of Solid Materials from USNRC-Licensed Facilities, the Panel on Prospective Benefits of DOE’s Distributed Energy Resources R&D Program, and the Panel on Air and Ground Vehicle Technology for the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board. He has a B.S. and an M.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology.


Victor Gilinsky is an independent consultant, primarily on domestic and international issues involving nuclear electric generation and associated fuel cycle systems. He has held a number of positions including commissioner, USNRC; head, Physical Sciences Department, and director, Applied Science and Technology Program, The Rand Corporation; assistant director for policy and program review, Office of Planning and Analysis, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission; and physicist, The Rand Corporation. He received the Distinguished Alumni Award, California Institute of Technology, and is a member of the American Physical Society (APS), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the International Council on Large Electric Systems, and the International Institute of Strategic Studies. He has a bachelor’s degree in engineering physics, Cornell University, and a Ph.D. in physics, California Institute of Technology.


Mujid S. Kazimi is director, Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, and professor of nuclear engineering and of mechanical engineering, MIT. He has been on the faculty at MIT since 1976 and previously served as head of the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering. He also held positions at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Westinghouse Electric Corporation prior to joining the MIT faculty. He has extensive expertise in advanced nuclear energy systems, in reactor design and safety analysis, the nuclear fuel cycle, and nuclear research. He has served on numerous review committees and panels and currently serves as a member of the board of managers of Battelle Energy Alliance, which manages the Idaho National Laboratory. He is coauthor of Nuclear Systems, a two-volume book on the thermal analysis and design of nuclear fission reactors. He served on the NRC Panel on Separations Technology and Transmutation Systems and on the NRC Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use. He is a fellow of the ANS. He has a B.Eng. (Alexandria University), an M.S. (MIT), and a Ph.D. (MIT) in nuclear engineering.


Salomon Levy (NAE) is sole owner, Levy & Associates, which was formed in 1994 to provide consulting services to the power industry. He has consulted for many electric utilities and several power equipment manufacturers and EPRI. He also held a number of positions at General Electric, including manager, Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow Development; manager, Systems Engineering; manager, Design Engineering; general manager, Nuclear Fuel Department; general manager, Boiling Water Reactor System Department, and general manager, Boiling Water Reactor Operations, where he was responsible for the engineering and manufacturing of all the GE nuclear power business. He has served on a number of nuclear power plant and safety review committees, including the Nuclear Regulatory Safety Research Review Committee, the PSE&G Salem and Hope Creek Nuclear Oversight Committee, the Duane Arnold Safety Review Committee, the Offsite Safety Review Committee of the Palo Verde plants, and the Nuclear Oversight Committee for Ontario Hydro Nuclear, among others. He served on the Advisory Council for the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations and was the U.S. representative on the International Safety Advisory group of the IAEA. He has extensive experience in the development of nuclear systems for high-performance boiling water reactors, regulation and licensing of power plants, nuclear power plant and systems design, and safety control and systems. He has a B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.


Allison Macfarlane is currently an associate professor of environmental science and policy at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. She is also an affiliate of the Program in Science, Technology and Society at MIT and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches for Committee Members." National Research Council. 2008. Review of DOE's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11998.
×

the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University. She has also held a faculty position at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, Georgia. She has held fellowships at the Bunting Institute at Radcliffe College, the Center for International Security and Arms Control at Stanford University, and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University. From 1998 to 2000 she was a Social Science Research Council-MacArthur Foundation fellow in international peace and security. She currently serves on the board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. Her research focuses on international security and environmental policy issues associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear energy. MIT Press has just published her book Uncertainty Underground: Yucca Mountain and the Nation’s High-Level Nuclear Waste, which explores unresolved technical issues for nuclear waste disposal at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. She received her Ph.D. in geology from MIT in 1992.


Regis A. Matzie is senior vice president and chief technology officer, Westinghouse Electric Company. He is responsible for all Westinghouse research and development undertakings and advanced nuclear plant development. Previously, Dr. Matzie was responsible for the development, licensing, detailed engineering, project management, and component manufacturing of new Westinghouse light water reactors. He was also the executive in charge of Westinghouse replacement steam generator projects and dry spent-fuel-canister fabrication projects. He became a senior vice president in 2000, when Westinghouse Electric purchased the nuclear businesses of ABB. Earlier, Dr. Matzie was vice president of nuclear systems for ABB Combustion Engineering (ABB CE) Nuclear Power in Windsor, Connecticut. During his 25 years with ABB CE, he held technical and management positions, including vice president of nuclear engineering; vice president of nuclear systems development; director of advanced water reactor projects; manager of reactor engineering; and manager of analog plants. Dr. Matzie’s career has been devoted primarily to the development of advanced nuclear systems and advanced fuel cycles, and he is the author of more than 120 technical papers and reports on these subjects. He completed 30 years of active and reserve service in the U.S. Navy in 1995, retiring with the rank of captain. Dr. Matzie graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy, where he obtained a B.S. in physics, and served in the U.S. nuclear submarine program for 5 years. He then attended Stanford University, where he earned an M.S. and a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering.


Warren F. Miller, Jr. (NAE) was recently appointed associate director of the Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute, Texas A&M University System. From 1974 to 2001, he held a number of positions at Los Alamos National Laboratory, including group leader, reactor and transport theory; deputy associate director for nuclear programs; associate laboratory director for energy programs; and deputy laboratory director for science and technology. He has held positions at the University of New Mexico, the University of Michigan, Howard University, the University of California, Berkeley, and Northwestern University. He is a fellow of the ANS, a State of New Mexico Eminent Scholar (1989), a member of the NAE, and the 2004 Distinguished Engineer of the National Society of Black Engineers. He has served on a variety of advisory groups and committees and was vice chair of the NRC Committee of the Division on Earth and Life Sciences and was a member of the NRC Committee on Long Term Environmental Quality Research and Development. He served on the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Council from 1997 to 2006. He has expertise in nuclear reactor design, transport and reactor analysis and theory, radioactive waste management, transmutation of materials, and management of R&D programs. He has a B.S. in engineering sciences, U.S. Military Academy, West Point, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in engineering sciences, Northwestern University.


David L. Morrison is retired director of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. His previous positions include technical director of the Energy, Resource and Environmental Systems Division, MITRE Corporation; president of the IIT Research Institute; and director of program development and management, Battelle Memorial Institute. He has been a member of the NRC’s Energy Engineering Board and the National Materials Advisory Board, chaired the NRC Committee on Alternative Energy R&D Strategies, chaired the NRC Committee on Industrial Energy Conservation, and has served on a number of NRC committees, including the Committee on Fuel Economy of Automobiles and Light Trucks, the Committee on Impact and Effectiveness of Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards, and the Committee to Review the United States Advanced Battery Consortium’s Electric Vehicle R&D Project Selection Process. He also served as chair of the Committee to Review the R&D Strategy for Biomass-Derived Ethanol and Biodiesel Transportation Fuels. Dr. Morrison was designated a lifetime national associate of the National Academy of Sciences in 2001. His areas of expertise include research management, energy and environmental research, materials, nuclear technology, and physical chemistry, and he has extensive experience in the assessment of energy technologies. Dr. Morrison received a B.S. degree from Grove City College and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the Carnegie Institute of Technology.


Per F. Peterson is a professor and former chair of nuclear engineering at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB). Before that he was a fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, and engineer at Bechtel National. Honors and awards include the Excellence in Fusion Engineering Award (1999) of Fusion Power Associates, visiting scholar at Los Alamos National

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches for Committee Members." National Research Council. 2008. Review of DOE's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11998.
×

Laboratory (1997-1998), NSF Presidential Young Investigator (1990-1995), and fellow, ANS. Dr. Peterson’s research and teaching focus on problems in energy and environmental systems, including inertial confinement fusion, advanced reactors, high level nuclear waste processing, and nuclear materials management, as well as on heat and mass transfer, fluid dynamics, and reactor thermal hydraulics as they pertain to nuclear applications. Ongoing research includes molten salt applications in nuclear hydrogen and electricity production, advanced high-temperature Brayton cycles, high-temperature ceramic composite heat exchangers, and fission and fusion applications. Recent publications include an assessment methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection of Generation IV nuclear power systems. Dr. Peterson manages the UCB Thermal Hydraulics Research Laboratory. He has a B.S. in mechanical engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering, UCB.


Geoffrey S. Rothwell is a senior lecturer, Department of Economics, and associate director, Public Policy Program, Stanford University (1986-present). His research focuses on all aspects of nuclear power economics, including the application of options theory to investment in new nuclear plants (NP 2010) and the economics of advanced nuclear electricity and hydrogen technology selection (Gen IV). He has been on many advisory groups, including these: (1) Generation IV Roadmap committee (member, Evaluation Methodology Group, 2001-2003, and co-chair, Economics Cross-cut Group, 2002-2003) and, currently, Economic Modeling Working Group, Generation IV International Forum (2003-2007), (2) chair, International Atomic Energy Agency’s Committee on Methodology for Nuclear Power Plant Performance and Statistical Analysis (1995-1997), and (3) member, NRC’s Committee on Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Uranium Enrichment Facilities (1993-1996). He was a postdoctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology (1985-1986). He received a Ph.D. in economics from UCB (1985); an M.A. in jurisprudence and social policy, Boalt Hall Law School, UCB (1984); an M.A. in economics, UCB (1982); a B.A. from Evergreen State College (1975); and a baccalauréat (A4) from the Lycée François Premier, Le Havre, France (1972).


John J. Taylor (NAE) is a nuclear energy consultant. As vice president for nuclear power at EPRI (retired), he was responsible for nuclear power R&D in support utilities worldwide. As vice president, now retired, of Westinghouse Electric’s water reactors business unit, he was responsible for the company’s worldwide commercial nuclear power business. He played key roles in the development of the first U.S. nuclear-powered submarines, aircraft carriers, and cruisers, and the first U.S. nuclear electric generating station. Mr. Taylor has served on many advisory committees on nuclear power R&D, reactor design, the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants, and nuclear weapon proliferation both here and abroad, giving advice to nuclear energy industry associations, the National Academies, DOE, the USNRC, national laboratories, the IAEA, and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. He has testified on nuclear energy issues to the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives, and the U.K. House of Commons. Mr. Taylor is a member of the NAE, a member and fellow of the ANS, the APS, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has authored or coauthored many papers and articles and several books on various aspects of nuclear energy. He has A.B. and D.Sc.(Hon.) degrees from St. John’s University and an M.S. degree from the University of Notre Dame.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches for Committee Members." National Research Council. 2008. Review of DOE's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11998.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches for Committee Members." National Research Council. 2008. Review of DOE's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11998.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches for Committee Members." National Research Council. 2008. Review of DOE's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11998.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches for Committee Members." National Research Council. 2008. Review of DOE's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11998.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches for Committee Members." National Research Council. 2008. Review of DOE's Nuclear Energy Research and Development Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11998.
×
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There has been a substantial resurgence of interest in nuclear power in the United States over the past few years. One consequence has been a rapid growth in the research budget of DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy (NE). In light of this growth, the Office of Management and Budget included within the FY2006 budget request a study by the National Academy of Sciences to review the NE research programs and recommend priorities among those programs. The programs to be evaluated were: Nuclear Power 2010 (NP 2010), Generation IV (GEN IV), the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)/Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) facilities. This book presents a description and analysis of each program along with specific findings and recommendations. It also provides an assessment of program priorities and oversight.

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