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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
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Appendix A
Workshop Agenda

MITIGATING THE NUTRITIONAL IMPACTS OF THE GLOBAL FOOD PRICE CRISIS

JULY 14–16, 2009, WORKSHOP AGENDA


The Kaiser Family Foundation

Barbara Jordan Conference Center

1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005


Day One: Tuesday, July 14, 2009

8:30

Continental breakfast available

9:00–9:10

Welcome

Harvey Fineberg, Institute of Medicine President

9:10–9:20

Introduction

Reynaldo Martorell, Emory University, Workshop Moderator

9:20–9:30

Welcome from sponsor

Ellen Piwoz, Global Health Program, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

SESSION 1
The Dual Crises: Tandem Threats to Nutrition

Session Objectives:

To set the stage for the deliberations by having an overview of the recent food price crisis and how it, in tandem with the current economic crisis (to be discussed July 15 by Hans Timmer), affects developing countries.

 

Moderator: Reynaldo Martorell, Workshop Planning Committee Chair

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
×

9:30–10:00

The Recent and Current Food Price Crisis and Future Perspectives

Per Pinstrup-Andersen, Cornell University

10:00–10:30

Question and answer session

10:30–10:45

Break

SESSION 2
Impacts on Nutrition

Session Objectives:

To understand the pathways from the food price and economic crises to nutritional impact, including a discussion of existing evidence and vulnerable populations.

 

Moderator: Isatou Jallow, World Food Programme

10:45–11:15

Conceptual Presentation on Pathways to Nutritional Impact

Ricardo Uauy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; University of Chile

11:15–11:45

Existing Evidence of Nutritional Impacts

Francesco Branca, World Health Organization

11:45–12:15

Are the Urban Poor Particularly Vulnerable?

Marie Ruel, International Food Policy Research Institute

12:15–1:00

Open discussion

1:00–1:45

Lunch provided

SESSION 3
Responding to the Crises at the Country Level

Session Objectives:

To understand the range of country experiences with the food price and economic crises and their impact on food security and nutrition, as well as country-level responses to these crises.

 

Moderator: Ruth Oniang’o, Rural Outreach Program, Kenya

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
×

1:45–2:05

The Role of Ministries in Responding to the Crises at the Country Level

Ruth Oniang’o, Rural Outreach Program, Kenya

2:05–2:35

Review of National Responses to the Food Crisis

Hafez Ghanem, Food and Agriculture Organization

Country Experiences and Responses: Case Studies

2:35–2:55

The Case of Mexico

Graciela Teruel Belismelis, Iberoamericana University

2:55–3:15

The Global Food Price Crisis and Food Development Strategy in China

Fangquan Mei, State Council Food and Nutrition Consultant Committee; Chinese Association for Agricultural Modernization

3:15–3:30

Break

3:30–3:50

Food Prices, Consumption, and Nutrition in Ethiopia: Implications of Recent Price Shocks

Paul Dorosh, International Food Policy Research Institute, Ethiopia

3:50–4:10

Bangladesh Case Study

Josephine Iziku Ippe, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)

4:10–5:15

Moderated discussion

5:15

Adjourn for the day

Day Two: Wednesday, July 15, 2009

8:30

Continental breakfast available

9:00–9:05

Introduction to day two

Reynaldo Martorell, Emory University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
×

SESSION 4
Revisiting the Dual Crises: Tandem Threats to Nutrition

Session Objectives:

To set the stage for the deliberations by having an overview of the current economic crisis and how it, in tandem with the recent food price crisis (addressed July 14 by Per Pinstrup-Andersen), affects developing countries.

 

Moderator: Reynaldo Martorell, Emory University

9:05–9:35

The Current Economic Crisis and Future Perspectives

Hans Timmer, The World Bank

9:35–10:05

Question and answer session

SESSION 5
A Role for Nutrition Surveillance in Addressing the Global Food Crisis

Session Objectives:

To encourage a broad discussion of nutrition surveillance, including existing nutrition surveillance systems, their capacity to monitor food price fluctuations, and the gaps and needs for improved surveillance.

 

Moderator: Keith West, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

10:05–10:35

Nutrition Surveillance in Relation to the Food Price and Economic Crises

John Mason, Tulane University

10:35–10:50

Break

10:50–11:50

Strengths and Limitations of Past, Existing, and Budding Nutrition Surveillance Systems (15 minutes/speaker)

 

Andrew Thorne-Lyman, Helen Keller International Nutrition Surveillance Projects; Harvard School of Public Health

Chris Hillbruner, FEWS NET; Chemonics

Anna Taylor, Listening Posts Project; Save the Children UK

Ellen Mathys, FANTA-2 Project; Academy for Educational Development

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
×

11:50–12:50

Moderated discussion

12:50–1:30

Lunch provided

SESSION 6
The Global Response to the Crises

Session Objectives:

To understand the landscape of the global nutrition field, those who work in it, and their respective roles and capacities to respond to the food price and economic crises.

 

Moderator: Hans Herren, Millennium Institute

1:30–2:00

Introduction to the Global Nutrition Landscape

Ruth Levine, Center for Global Development

2:00–3:00

The Role and Capacity of Civil Society, the Private Sector, and Foundations in Responding to the Crises (15 minutes/speaker)

 

Haddis Tadesse, Gates Foundation

Derek Yach, PepsiCo

Asma Lateef, Bread for the World

Tom Arnold, Concern Worldwide

3:00–3:15

Break

3:15–4:30

The Role and Capacity of UN Agencies in Responding to the Crises (15 minutes/speaker)

 

David Nabarro, United Nations Task Force on Global Food Security Crisis

Werner Schultink, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)

Martin Bloem, World Food Programme

Hafez Ghanem, Food and Agriculture Organization

Francesco Branca, World Health Organization World Health Organization

4:30–5:30

Moderated discussion

5:30

Adjourn for the day

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
×

Day Three: Thursday, July 16, 2009

8:30

Continental breakfast available

9:00–9:05

Introduction to day three

Reynaldo Martorell, Emory University

SESSION 7
Reorientation of U.S. Policy in Food and Nutrition

Session Objectives:

To discuss what the U.S. government can and should do to help avoid future food crises and to mitigate the negative nutrition effects of those that cannot be avoided.

 

Moderator: Jackie Judd, Kaiser Family Foundation

9:05–10:45

The U.S. Government Response to the Crises (20 minutes/speaker)

 

Representative James McGovern, Roadmap to End Global Hunger

Michael Zeilinger, U.S. Agency for International Development

Nina Fedoroff, U.S. Department of State

Rajiv Shah, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Catherine Bertini and Dan Glickman, Chicago Initiative on Global Agricultural Development

10:45–12:00

Moderated discussion

12:00–12:15

Summary discussion and wrap-up

Reynaldo Martorell, Emory University

12:15

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
×
Page159
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
×
Page160
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
×
Page161
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
×
Page162
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
×
Page163
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
×
Page164
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In 2007 and 2008, the world witnessed a dramatic increase in food prices. The global financial crisis that began in 2008 compounded the burden of high food prices, exacerbating the problems of hunger and malnutrition in developing countries. The tandem food price and economic crises struck amidst the massive, chronic problem of hunger and undernutrition in developing countries. National governments and international actors have taken a variety of steps to mitigate the negative effects of increased food prices on particular groups. The recent abrupt increase in food prices, in tandem with the current global economic crisis, threatens progress already made in these areas, and could inhibit future efforts.

The Institute of Medicine held a workshop, summarized in this volume, to describe the dynamic technological, agricultural, and economic issues contributing to the food price increases of 2007 and 2008 and their impacts on health and nutrition in resource-poor regions. The compounding effects of the current global economic downturn on nutrition motivated additional discussions on these dual crises, their impacts on the nutritional status of vulnerable populations, and opportunities to mitigate their negative nutritional effects.

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