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The New Global Ecosystem in Advanced Computing: Implications for U.S. Competitiveness and National Security (2012)

Chapter:Appendix H: Top 20 Largest Hardware and Software Companies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Top 20 Largest Hardware and Software Companies." National Research Council. 2012. The New Global Ecosystem in Advanced Computing: Implications for U.S. Competitiveness and National Security. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13472.
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H


Top 20 Largest Hardware and Software Companies

TABLE H-1 World’s 20 Largest Hardware and Software Companies in 2010 (in U.S. $ Millions)

Rank Hardware Companies (Country) Hardware Revenue Total Revenue   Rank Software Companies (Country) Software Revenue Total Revenues
1 Samsung (S. Korea) 77,865 120,119   1 Microsoft (USA) 49,090 61,159
2 HP (USA) 73,729 116,245   2 IBM (USA) 21,396 95,758
3 Foxconn (Taiwan) 44,411 44,411   3 Oracle (USA) 18,582 22,734
4 LG Electronics (S Korea) 42,029 63,043   4 SAP (Germany) 11,386 15,373
5 Nokia (Finland) 40,108 59,042   5 Ericsson (Sweden) 7,595 29,014
6 Toshiba (Japan) 40,057 69,778   6 Nintendo (Japan) 6,799 17,726
7 Dell (USA) 38,395 53,585   7 HP (USA) 6,183 116,245
8 Intel (USA) 34,026 35,172   8 Symantec (USA) 5,565 5,992
9 Apple (USA) 31,772 43,086   9 Nokia Siemens Networks (Finland) 4,529 18,114
10 Cisco (USA) 29,510 36,633   10 Activision Blizzard (USA) 4,279 4,279
11 Quanta Computer (Taiwan) 24,755 24,755   11 CA (USA) 4,012 4,318
12 Fujitsu (Japan) 23,056 50,662   12 EMC (USA) 3,960 14,026
13 Canon (Japan) 22,567 34,719   13 Electronic Arts (USA) 3,728 3,728
14 Ricoh (Japan) 19,484 22,018   14 Adobe (USA) 2,796 2,987
15 Asus (Taiwan) 19,074 19,074   15 Cisco (USA) 2,137 36,663
16 Acer (Taiwan) 17,944 17,944   16 SunGard (USA) 1,996 5,508
17 Compal Electronics (Taiwan) 16,923 19,909   17 Sony (Japan) 1,914 79,441
18 IBM (USA) 16,190 95,758   18 BMC (USA) 1,758 1,888
19 Lenovo (China) 16,132 16,132   19 Alcatel-Lucent (USA) 1,635 21,835
20 NEC (Japan) 16,127 40,475   20 Konami (Japan) 1,594 2,887
Adopted from www.hardwaretop100.org   Adopted from www.softwaretop100.org

The methodology employed in creating these tables is available at http://www.hardwaretop100.org/methodology.php. Last accessed on June 16, 2012. While many of the companies on the list are global in nature, the table lists each company’s nation of origin.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Top 20 Largest Hardware and Software Companies." National Research Council. 2012. The New Global Ecosystem in Advanced Computing: Implications for U.S. Competitiveness and National Security. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13472.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Top 20 Largest Hardware and Software Companies." National Research Council. 2012. The New Global Ecosystem in Advanced Computing: Implications for U.S. Competitiveness and National Security. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13472.
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Page97
Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Top 20 Largest Hardware and Software Companies." National Research Council. 2012. The New Global Ecosystem in Advanced Computing: Implications for U.S. Competitiveness and National Security. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13472.
×
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Computing and information and communications technology (ICT) has dramatically changed how we work and live, has had profound effects on nearly every sector of society, has transformed whole industries, and is a key component of U.S. global leadership. A fundamental driver of advances in computing and ICT has been the fact that the single-processor performance has, until recently, been steadily and dramatically increasing year over years, based on a combination of architectural techniques, semiconductor advances, and software improvements. Users, developers, and innovators were able to depend on those increases, translating that performance into numerous technological innovations and creating successive generations of ever more rich and diverse products, software services, and applications that had profound effects across all sectors of society. However, we can no longer depend on those extraordinary advances in single-processor performance continuing. This slowdown in the growth of single-processor computing performance has its roots in fundamental physics and engineering constraints--multiple technological barriers have converged to pose deep research challenges, and the consequences of this shift are deep and profound for computing and for the sectors of the economy that depend on and assume, implicitly or explicitly, ever-increasing performance. From a technology standpoint, these challenges have led to heterogeneous multicore chips and a shift to alternate innovation axes that include, but are not limited to, improving chip performance, mobile devices, and cloud services. As these technical shifts reshape the computing industry, with global consequences, the United States must be prepared to exploit new opportunities and to deal with technical challenges. The New Global Ecosystem in Advanced Computing: Implications for U.S. Competitiveness and National Security outlines the technical challenges, describe the global research landscape, and explore implications for competition and national security.

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