National Academies Press: OpenBook

Investigating Safety Impacts of Energy Technologies on Airports and Aviation (2011)

Chapter: Chapter Seven - Summary of Data Gaps and Current Agency Programs

« Previous: Chapter Six - Electrical Transmission Infrastructure
Page 31
Suggested Citation:"Chapter Seven - Summary of Data Gaps and Current Agency Programs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Investigating Safety Impacts of Energy Technologies on Airports and Aviation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14590.
×
Page 31
Page 32
Suggested Citation:"Chapter Seven - Summary of Data Gaps and Current Agency Programs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Investigating Safety Impacts of Energy Technologies on Airports and Aviation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14590.
×
Page 32

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

31 The following is a summary of data gaps and current agency programs. DATA GAPS In reviewing the existing knowledge base for investigating safety impacts of energy technologies on aviation, the fol- lowing data gaps have been identified. Filling these gaps will increase the knowledge base and improve the understanding of the issue. These data are not necessarily exclusive nor are they listed in any area of priority. Comprehensive Inventory of Facilities Prepare a comprehensive inventory of energy facilities. If the inventory was stored in a geographic information system database it could include information on each facility from technology type to aviation hazards identified. The database would form a baseline knowledge tool useful for supporting planning and cumulative impact assessment. Survey of Pilots Conduct a survey of pilots focused on airports where energy facilities are located. Collect experiential information about their knowledge of energy facilities, how they are impacted, and details of specific incidences that could contribute to the current knowledge base. Assessment of Aircraft Accidents and Potential Energy Connection Conduct a thorough study of accident reports filed with the NTSB to identify conditions associated with accidents and if there was an energy issue. Follow up the document search with phone inquiries to identify information beyond that reported in the formal report. Identification of Siting and Planning Guidance Based in part on information presented in this report, as well as follow-up review and discussion with stakeholders, develop siting and planning guidance for various energy technologies. The guidance could represent a useful tool in directing projects to locations where aviation safety risks can be minimized. The DoD’s screening tool is a good example of siting guidance that could be applied to other technologies. Assessment of Risk and Development of Adaptation Using the information provided in this report as well as the additional data needs identified, produce a risk assessment of energy technologies on airports and aviation. Provide a sys- tematic analysis of how each energy technology is altering avi- ation activities and describe the potential consequences of the alteration on the aviation community. In addition, identify how aviation can adapt to the changing energy landscape. Assessment of Cumulative Impacts Existing information on the potential cumulative impacts of new energy projects is inadequate. There was some reference to cumulative impacts assessment in relation to the number of wind turbine generators proposed in specific geographic areas of the country (e.g., Columbia River Watershed). However, no metrics for measuring cumulative impacts were identified. This would be a useful tool for future research. Development of Glare Assessment Tools The Sandia National Laboratories has undertaken some studies to assess the impact from concentrating solar power (see Fig- ure 22). However, practical tools for modeling and predict- ing glare still need to be developed. The glare assessment tools may be able to quantify what a glare event is, when it will occur, and the consequences of exposure. This would provide an ana- lytical tool for future projects that is consistent with existing experiences. Field Data Collection on Thermal Plume Turbulence The current knowledge provides some suggestions on how far above an energy facility an aircraft should stay to avoid thermal plume turbulence. The height is based on modeling that predicts the velocity of the thermal updraft maintaining a rate of 4.3 m/s or more. However, the impact metric is based on a value used in Australia. Field data on the velocity of a CHAPTER SEVEN SUMMARY OF DATA GAPS AND CURRENT AGENCY PROGRAMS

thermal plume that may produce an impact are limited. There- fore, it is suggested that specific field trials be conducted to measure impacts of thermal plume velocity on aircraft to more specifically measure the risk. CURRENT AGENCY PROGRAMS The development of indigenous, clean energy supplies is an important, and relatively new, national policy initiative. 32 Preservation of the National Airspace System is an estab- lished, long-term objective. Where these two important objec- tives intersect new issues are raised and conflicts require assessment and resolution. Federal and state agencies have been working together on a number of fronts to increase new clean energy projects without negatively impacting airspace, a finite resource. The DoD worked closely with the FAA, Travis Air Force Base, the American Wind Energy Association, and individ- ual wind energy companies to study potential impacts of pro- posed wind farms in Solano County, California, on military readiness. One product of this work was the DoD’s Wind Farm Screening Tool, found on the OE/AAA website, which enables wind developers to identify military conflicts early in the process. Presently, the FAA’s Aircraft Flight Standards group is working with the DOE, the DOE’s Sandia National Laborato- ries, the Solar Energy Industries Association, and solar com- pany representatives to discuss issues of potential impacts associated with concentrated solar power facilities. The FAA is also preparing an internal report on the poten- tial impacts of thermal plumes from air-cooled condensers associated with steam turbine generation. FIGURE 22 Power Tower Abengoa Energy, Spain (courtesy: Dr. Clifford Ho, U.S. DOE, Sandia National Laboratories).

Next: Chapter Eight - Conclusions »
Investigating Safety Impacts of Energy Technologies on Airports and Aviation Get This Book
×
 Investigating Safety Impacts of Energy Technologies on Airports and Aviation
Buy Paperback | $41.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 28: Investigating Safety Impacts of Energy Technologies on Airports and Aviation explores physical, visual, and communications systems interference impacts from energy technologies on airports and aviation safety.

The energy technologies that are the focus of this report include the following:

• solar photovoltaic panels and farms,

• concentrating solar power plants,

• wind turbine generators and farms, and

• traditional power plants.

READ FREE ONLINE

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!