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Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform: The Federal Role (2014)

Chapter:Appendix A: Speakers and Interviews

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers and Interviews." National Research Council. 2014. Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform: The Federal Role. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18753.
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Appendix A

Speakers and Interviews

SPEAKERS
FIRST COMMITTEE MEETING, JANUARY 21-22, 2014


TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2014
Washington, D.C.

2:15 p.m. Committee Charge and Sponsor Expectations for Study
 
  • Robert Listenbee Jr., Administrator, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice

  • Laurie R. Garduque, Director, Justice Reform
    MacArthur Foundation

  • Bart Lubow, Director
    Annie E. Casey Foundation

WEDNESDAY, January 22, 2014

8:30 a.m. Overview of OJJDP’s Mission and Budget
 
  • Robert Listenbee Jr., Administrator, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice

  • Janet Chiancone, Associate Administrator, Budget and Administration Division, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice

9:30 a.m.

OJJDP Grant Making

 
  • Janet Chiancone, Associate Administrator, Budget and Administration Division, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers and Interviews." National Research Council. 2014. Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform: The Federal Role. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18753.
×

10:45 a.m.

Overview of OJJDP Training and Technical Assistance and Research

 
  • Brecht Donoghue, Deputy Associate Administrator, Innovations and Research Division, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
    U.S. Department of Justice

SPEAKERS
SECOND COMMITTEE MEETING, FEBRUARY 13-14, 2014


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014
Washington, D.C.

8:30 a.m. Panel—Legal System
 
  • Melissa Sickmund, Director
    National Center for Juvenile Justice
    National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges

  • Susan Broderick, Project Director
    Center for Juvenile Justice Reform
    Georgetown University

  • Mary Ann Scali, Deputy Director
    National Juvenile Defender Center

10:30 a.m.

Presentation—State Advisory Groups

 
  • Marie Williams, Executive Director
    Coalition for Juvenile Justice

  • Robin Jenkins, Consultant
    Coalition for Juvenile Justice

1:00 p.m.

Panel—Family and Youth

 
  • Susan Badeau, Speaker, Author and Trainer

2:45 p.m.

Panel—Racial and Ethnic Disparities

 
  • Alex Piquero, Ashbel Smith Professor in Criminology
    University of Texas at Dallas

  • Bryan Sykes, Assistant Professor of Sociology
    DePaul University

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014

8:30 a.m. OJP Presentation and Discussion
 
  • Karol Mason, Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs
    U.S. Department of Justice
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers and Interviews." National Research Council. 2014. Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform: The Federal Role. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18753.
×

10:00 a.m.

Panel—Advocacy

 
  • Carmen Daugherty, Policy Director
    Campaign for Youth Justice

  • Sarah Bryer, Director
    National Juvenile Justice Network

  • Marc Schindler, Executive Director
    Justice Policy Institute

SPEAKERS
THIRD COMMITTEE MEETING, MARCH 26-27, 2014


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 2014
Washington, D.C.

8:30 a.m. Panel—Perspectives on the Federal Role in Reforming the Nation’s Juvenile Justice System
 
  • Clarence J. Robinson
    Professor of Criminology, Law and Society
    George Mason University

  • Mark Soler, Executive Director
    Center for Children’s Law and Policy

10:15 a.m.

Panel—Perspectives from Judges and State Leaders of Reform

 
  • George Timberlake, Judge (ret.)
    Illinois Juvenile Justice Commission

  • Dave Marsden, Senator
    State of Virginia

  • Sarah Brown, Program Director, Criminal Justice
    National Conference of State Legislatures

  • Juliana Stratton, Executive Director
    Cook County Justice Advisory Council

THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014

9:00 a.m. Discussion—Juveniles Perspective
 
  • Brandon Jones, Executive Director
    New Generation Foundation

10:15 a.m.

Presentation—Racial and Ethnic Disparities (VTC)

 
  • Michael Finley, Senior Program Associate
    W. Haywood Burns Institute for Juvenile Justice, Fairness, and Equity
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers and Interviews." National Research Council. 2014. Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform: The Federal Role. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18753.
×

11:15 a.m.

Presentation—Data

 
  • Melissa Sickmund, Director
    National Center for Juvenile Justice

11:45 a.m.

Public and Sponsor Comments

 
  • Soledad McGrath, Program Officer
    MacArthur Foundation

  • Carrie Rae Boatman, Senior Policy Associate
    Annie E. Casey Foundation

  • Lyman Legters, Casey Fellow
    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
    U.S. Department of Justice

INTERVIEWS

Francis Mendez, Project Director, National Training and Technical Assistance Center: February 10, 2014

Shay Bilchik, Founder and Director, Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy: March 24, 2014

Gary Blau, Becky Flatow, and Kaitlyn Harrington, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: April 7, 2014

Kathi Grasso and Robin Delany-Shabazz, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, current and former directors of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention: April 11, 2014

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers and Interviews." National Research Council. 2014. Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform: The Federal Role. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18753.
×
Page89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers and Interviews." National Research Council. 2014. Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform: The Federal Role. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18753.
×
Page90
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers and Interviews." National Research Council. 2014. Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform: The Federal Role. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18753.
×
Page91
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Speakers and Interviews." National Research Council. 2014. Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform: The Federal Role. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18753.
×
Page92
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In the past decade, a number of state, local, and tribal jurisdictions have begun to take significant steps to overhaul their juvenile justice systems - for example, reducing the use of juvenile detention and out-of-home placement, bringing greater attention to racial and ethnic disparities, looking for ways to engage affected families in the process, and raising the age at which juvenile court jurisdiction ends. These changes are the result of heightening awareness of the ineffectiveness of punitive practices and accumulating knowledge about adolescent development. Momentum for reform is growing. However, many more state, local, and tribal jurisdictions need assistance, and practitioners in the juvenile justice field are looking for guidance from the federal government, particularly from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) in the Department of Justice.

Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform identifies and prioritizes strategies and policies to effectively facilitate reform of the juvenile justice system and develop an implementation plan for OJJDP. Based on the 2013 report Reforming Juvenile Justice, this report is designed to provide specific guidance to OJJDP regarding the steps that it should take, both internally and externally, to facilitate juvenile justice reform grounded in knowledge about adolescent development. The report identifies seven hallmarks of a developmental approach to juvenile justice to guide system reform: accountability without criminalization, alternatives to justice system involvement, individualized response based on needs and risks, confinement only when necessary for public safety, genuine commitment to fairness, sensitivity to disparate treatment, and family engagement. Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform outlines how these hallmarks should be incorporated into policies and practices within OJJDP, as well as in actions extended to state, local, and tribal jurisdictions to achieve the goals of the juvenile justice system through a developmentally informed approach.

This report sets forth a detailed and prioritized strategic plan for the federal government to support and facilitate developmentally oriented juvenile justice reform. The pivotal component of the plan is to strengthen the role, capacity, and commitment of OJJDP, the lead federal agency in the field. By carrying out the recommendations of Implementing Juvenile Justice Reform, the federal government will both reaffirm and advance the promise of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act.

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