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Suggested Citation:"A--Committee Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18832.
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A

Committee Activities

FIRST COMMITTEE MEETING
NOVEMBER 12-14, 2013
ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA

Objective: Engage in dialogue with sponsor; obtain sponsor perspective on study and statement of task; initiate data gathering; conduct initial study administrative actions, conduct composition and balance discussion; review report writing process and project plan; discuss future data gathering needs and plans; and set future meeting dates.

Briefings

  • Supply. Ms. Cathy Reese, Chief, Supply Division, U.S. Army G-44S, Supply Directorate
  • Force Protection and Distribution. Mr. Jason Trubenbach, Transportation Planning Specialist, U.S. Army G-44D, Force Protection and Distribution
  • Maintenance. COL Steven Pace, Deputy Director, Maintenance, U.S. Army, G-44M, Maintenance Directorate
  • Logistics Automation. Mr. George Brewer, Logistics Automation Analyst, U.S. Army G-46, Logistics CIO
  • Operations and Readiness. Mr. Randy Lewis, Chief, Contingency Operations, U.S. Army G-43, Operations and Readiness
  • Strategy and Integration. Mr. Desmond Keyes, Deputy Director, Operational Energy/Contingency Basing; COL Charles Cobbs III, Chief, Force Integration Division, U.S. Army G-45/7, Strategy and Integration; and Mr. Clay Hurt, PACOM Planner, U.S. Army G-45/7, Strategy and Integration
  • Logistics Innovation Agency. Mr. Sam Cooper, Research Analyst, Logistics Innovation Agency
  • Defense Logistics Agency. Mr. Edward J. Case, Vice Director, Defense Logistics Agency
  • Combined Arms Support Command. COL Bruce McPeak, Director, Materiel Systems Directorate (MSD); Mr. Steve Bourgeois, Deputy Director, Sustainment Battle Lab (SBL); Mr. Mike Kriz, Operational Energy, MSD; and Mr. Larry Perecko, Branch Chief, Science and Technology, SBL
Suggested Citation:"A--Committee Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18832.
×

SECOND COMMITTEE MEETING
JANUARY 16-17, 2014
WASHINGTON, D.C.

Objective: Conduct composition and bias discussion for remaining members not covered by November discussion; continue data gathering; engage in report discussion and planning; discuss future data gathering needs and plans.

Briefings

  • RFID Tagging. Mr. Reginald Madden, Operations Team Chief, Product Director Automated Movement and Identification Solutions; Mr. Fred Naigle, Automated Information for Movements SME and Product Director Automated Movement and Identification Solutions; Mr. Charles McCracken, Operations–Infrastructure, Product Director Automated Movement and Identification Solutions; and Mr. Robert Carpenter, Senior Logistics Analyst, Product Director Automated Movement and Identification Solutions, all from Army Enterprise Systems Integration Program
  • GCSS-Army, the Logistics Modernization Program, and the Army Enterprise Systems Integration Program Hub. Dr. Daniel C. Parker, Product Director AESIP Hub, Army Enterprise Systems Integration Program
  • DoD Operational Energy Plans and Programs. Ms. Sharon Burke, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Operational Energy Plans and Programs Department of Defense
  • TRANSCOM Future Transportation Strategy. Mr. Kenneth D. Watson, Deputy Director, Strategy, Policy, and Logistics, U.S. Transportation Command
  • Joint Logistics. Mr. Chris Christianson, LTG (ret.), Director, Center for Joint and Strategic Logistics, National Defense University
  • Marine Corps Logistics. COL Chris A. Arantz, Branch Head, Logistics Vision and Strategy Branch, Headquarters, United States Marine Corps; and Mr. Nick Linkowitz, Logistics Vision and Strategy Branch, Headquarters, United States Marine Corps
  • Supply Chain Transformation. Dr. Greg H. Parlier, Committee Member
  • Logistics R&D and Long Term R&D Strategy. Ms. Mary Miller, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology
  • Rapid Equipping Force Expeditionary Laboratory. Mr. Lee D. Gazzano, Futures Division, Rapid Equipping Force; and Ms. Paige Rasmussen, Futures Division, Rapid Equipping Force

THIRD COMMITTEE MEETING
FEBRUARY 4-6, 2014
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MARYLAND; FORT LEE, VIRGINIA;
FORT BELVOIR, VIRGINIA; AND WASHINGTON, D.C.

Objective: Continue data gathering, conduct committee deliberations, discuss report, discuss path ahead, and make any necessary work assignments.

Suggested Citation:"A--Committee Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18832.
×

On February 4-5, one team of the committee met at the Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) headquarters at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. They received the following briefings:

  • U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) Overview and Opening Discussion. Mr. Jyuji D. Hewitt, Deputy Director, RDECOM; and Mr. John M. Miller, Special Assistant to the Director, RDECOM
  • Ammunition Logistics—Precision Guided Munitions; Shared Services Umbrella; Lifecycle Maintenance of the Logistics Modernization Program. Mr. Alan J. Galonski, Chief, Future Concepts Division, U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC)
  • Condition-Based Maintenance. Mr. Steven E. Parker, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC); Mr. Johnny L. Prater, AMRDEC; Mr. Herman W. Robertson, AMRDEC; Mr. James J. Kelly, U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC); Mr. Edward J. Plichta, U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC); Mr. Joshua J. Fischer, Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate, CERDEC; and Mr. Robert G. Cole, CERDEC
  • Fuel Efficiency. Mr. James J. Kelly, TARDEC; Mr. Steven E. Parker, AMRDEC; Mr. Johnny L. Prater, AMRDEC; and Mr. Herman W. Robertson, AMRDEC
  • Logistics Automation—Automated Material Handling; Advanced Weapon Resupply and Management. Mr. Alan J. Galonski, Chief, Future Concepts Division, ARDEC; and Mr. Joshua J. Fischer, Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate, CERDEC
  • Water Acquisition—Sustainability/Logistics Basing; Waste/Blackwater Reuse. Mr. Richard J. Benney, U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC); and Mr. R.D. Carney, NSRDEC
  • TARDEC Water Purification Technologies. Mr. James J. Kelly, TARDEC
  • Water from Air. Mr. Richard J. Benney, NSRDEC; and Mr. R.D. Carney, NSRDEC
  • Networking. Mr. Gary M. Lichvar, U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command (CECOM)
  • Operational Energy—Advanced Woven PV, Equipment and Energy Technologies. Mr. Richard J. Benney, NSRDEC; Mr. R.D. Carney, NSRDEC; and Mr. Edward J. Plichta, CERDEC
  • Autonomous Vehicle Arena. Mr. Thomson David, TARDEC
  • AMRDEC Hunter/Killer. Mr. Steven E. Parker, AMRDEC; Mr. Johnny L. Prater, AMRDEC; and Mr. Herman W. Robertson, AMRDEC
  • Networks for Autonomous Vehicle. Mr. Edward J. Plichta, CERDEC; Mr. Joshua J. Fischer, Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate, CERDEC; and Mr. Robert G. Cole, CERDEC
  • 3D Printing. Mr. Rick Moore, U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center
  • Other R&D Efforts to Reduce the Logistical Burden—Precision Air Drop. Mr. Richard J. Benney, NSRDEC; and Mr. R.D. Carney, NSRDEC
  • Joint Combat Feeding. Mr. Richard J. Benney, NSRDEC; and Mr. R.D. Carney, NSRDEC
Suggested Citation:"A--Committee Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18832.
×
  • RF Convergence. Mr. Edward J. Plichta, CERDEC; Mr. Joshua J. Fischer, Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate, CERDEC; and Mr. Robert G. Cole, CERDEC
  • U.S. Army Materiel Systems Analysis Activity. Mr. Clarke J. Fox, Chief, Logistics Analysis Division, U.S. Army Materiel Systems Analysis Activity
  • U.S. Army Public Health Command. LTC Gayle E. McCowin, Portfolio Director, Environmental Health Engineering, U.S. Army Public Health Command—Institute of Public Health
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center. Dr. David A. Horner, Technical Director for Military Engineering, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center

Also on February 4-5, a second team met at Fort Lee, Virginia, and received briefings and engaged in discussions with the following individuals and organizations:

  • TRAC-LEE Command Brief. Dr. Gordon J. Goodwin, Director, TRADOC Analysis Center-Fort Lee (TRAC-Lee)
  • Logistics Battle Command (LBC) Model Brief. Mr. Morris Hayes, Chief, Modeling and Analysis Division, TRAC-Lee
  • Dynamic Maintenance (DM) Model Brief. Mr. Morris Akers, Modeling and Analysis Division, TRAC-Lee
  • Operational Energy (OE) Analysis Task Force Brief and OE Models—Current and Future. Mr. Morris Hayes, Chief, Modeling and Analysis Division, TRAC-Lee
  • Decision Point (DP) 15 Modeling and Analysis. Mr. Phil Raiford, Modeling and Analysis Division, TRAC-Lee
  • Discussion with US Army Logistics University Students. Various participants
  • Meetings with U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command on Logistics Game, Futures Center, and Sustainment Battle Laboratory. Various participants

On February 5, the Fort Lee team also visited Fort Belvoir, Virginia, and spoke with the following individuals:

  • Meeting at Center for Army Analysis. Dr. William F. Crain, Director, Center for Army Analysis; COL Brian K. Sperling, Chief of Staff, Center for Army Analysis; Dr. Steven A. Stoddard Center for Army Analysis; COL Mark W. Lukens, Deputy Director, U.S. Army Materiel Systems Analysis Activity

On February 6, the whole committee met in Washington, D.C., to conduct deliberations.

FOURTH COMMITTEE MEETING
MARCH 4-6, 2013
IRVINE, CALIFORNIA

Objective: Continue data gathering, conduct committee deliberations, conduct report drafting work, plot path forward, plan for final meeting.

Suggested Citation:"A--Committee Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18832.
×

The committee engaged in discussions with the following individuals and organizations:

  • U.S. Army Pacific Command. COL Skip Adams, U.S. Army Pacific Command (USARPAC) G4, PEPM Division Chief; Mr. Charles Willoughby, USARPAC G4 Material Readiness Branch; Mr. Doug Tostrud, USARPAC G4 Plans; CW4 James Moore, USARPAC G4 Mobility; CW4 Tamara Degrafenread, USARPAC G4 AVN Maintenance; and Mr. Jim Muldoon, USARPAC Science and Technology Advisor
  • Defense Logistics Agency Views on Future Logistics. RADM MacLaren, Director, Joint Reserve Force and Joint Contingency Acquisition Support Office, Defense Logistics Agency
  • Report Back on Meetings with the United States Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center. Steve Dellenback, Committee Member

FIFTH COMMITTEE MEETING
MAY 5-7, 2014
WASHINGTON, D.C.

Objective: Receive briefing from Army Material Command (AMC); conduct committee deliberations; Conduct report writing; plan path forward to concurrence.

  • AMC Virtual Contracting. Mr. Mark Morrison, AMC
  • AMC Virtual Integrated Materiel Management Center. Ms. Lisha Adams, AMC
  • AMC Virtual Labs. Mr. Mark Morrison, AMC

INDIVIDUALS CONTACTED BY COMMMITTEE MEMBERS

Ilker Adiguzel, Director, Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center

Jon Alt, LTC, USA, Naval Postgraduate School

Jeff Appleget, Naval Postgraduate School

Aruna Apte, Naval Postgraduate School

Darrell J. Bennis, COL, USA, PEO EIS Military Deputy

Jay Carr, U.S. Army Sustainment Command

Dan Coban, MAJ, USA, Student, North Carolina State University, about actual logistics experience in Afghanistan

Gregory Couch, MG (Ret.), USA, former USTRANSCOM Chief of Staff

Robert Dell, Naval Postgraduate School

James Eagle, Naval Postgraduate School

Glenn Edelschein, SAS Federal

Lee Ewing, Naval Postgraduate School

William M. Faulkner, LTG, USMC, Deputy Commandant Installations and Logistics

Kristin K. French, BG, USA, Commanding General, Joint Munitions and Lethality Life Cycle Management Command and Joint Munitions Command

Nancy J. Grandy, COL, USA, Assistant Commandant, U.S. Army Transportation School

Chris J. Grassano, Deputy PEO Ammunition (Acting)

James Grazioplene, MG (Ret.), USA, Vice President Contingency Operations. DynCorp International LLC

Suggested Citation:"A--Committee Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18832.
×

Ola Harrysson, North Carolina State University

Lynn Hinman, Headquarters, Quantum Research International

Casey Hodgson, Coca Cola

Jeff Holland, Director, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center

Jeffrey House, LTC, USA, Naval Postgraduate School

Wayne Hughes, Naval Postgraduate School

Harry H. Hungerford, COL, USA, J-4, U.S. Special Operations Command, Central

Jeff Hyink, CAPT, USN, Naval Postgraduate School

Paul Kern, GEN (Ret.), USA, former Commanding General, United States Army Material Command

Russell King, North Carolina State University

Jeffrey Kline, Naval Postgraduate School

Moshe Kress, Naval Postgraduate School

Stephen Krivitsky, U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence

William D. Lewis, CW5, USA, Headquarters, Department of the Army, Deputy Chief of Staff G-4 (Ammunition)

Brandon McConnell, CAPT, USN, Student, North Carolina State University, about actual logistics experience in Afghanistan

John J. McGuiness BG (Ret.), USA, former PEO Ammunition

Connor McLemore, LCDR, USN, Naval Postgraduate School

Patricia E. McQuistion, LTG, USA, Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Materiel Command

Vikram Mittal, of Draper Labs

James Moore, COL, USA, Commander, 404th Army Field Support Brigade

Daniel Nussbaum, Naval Postgraduate School

Noel J. Paschal, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command

Steven Pilnick, Naval Postgraduate School

Robert Prieto, Senior Vice President, Fluor Corporation

Matt Rogers, LTC, USA Student, North Carolina State University, about actual logistics experience in Afghanistan

David Schrady, Naval Postgraduate School

Chad Seagren, MAJ, USMC, Naval Postgraduate School

Stephen G. Sherbondy, COL, USA, Army Reserve G-4, U.S. Army Reserve Command

James Shields, PEO Ammunition

James Phil Shubert, Headquarters, Department of the Army, Deputy Chief of Staff G-3-5-7

David Simchi-Levi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Ryan Slocum, MAJ, USA, Student, North Carolina State University, about actual logistics experience in Afghanistan

Mitchell Stevenson, LTG (Ret.), USA, Liedos Inc.

Jeffrey Talley, LTG, USA, Chief, Army Reserve

Bradford Tousley, Director, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Tactical Technology Office

Tracy D Underkoffler, CW5, USA, U.S. Army Sustainment Center of Excellence (Watercraft)

Alan Washburn, Naval Postgraduate School

John F. Wharton, MG, USA, Commanding General of the United States Army Sustainment Command (ASC) and Commanding General, Rock Island Arsenal

Jerry W. Wheeler, Advanced Turbine Engine Company, LLC

Donald Whelan, BG (Ret.), USA, Former Director, Cypress International, Inc

Thomas R. Willemain, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Richard Zilmer, LTG (Ret.), USMC, former Commanding General, Multinational Forces-West (Anbar Province, Iraq) and Commanding General, III Marine Expeditionary Force, Okinawa, Japan

Suggested Citation:"A--Committee Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18832.
×
Page 181
Suggested Citation:"A--Committee Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18832.
×
Page 182
Suggested Citation:"A--Committee Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18832.
×
Page 183
Suggested Citation:"A--Committee Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18832.
×
Page 184
Suggested Citation:"A--Committee Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18832.
×
Page 185
Suggested Citation:"A--Committee Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18832.
×
Page 186
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The mission of the United States Army is to fight and win our nation's wars by providing prompt, sustained land dominance across the full range of military operations and spectrum of conflict in support of combatant commanders. Accomplishing this mission rests on the ability of the Army to equip and move its forces to the battle and sustain them while they are engaged. Logistics provides the backbone for Army combat operations. Without fuel, ammunition, rations, and other supplies, the Army would grind to a halt. The U.S. military must be prepared to fight anywhere on the globe and, in an era of coalition warfare, to logistically support its allies. While aircraft can move large amounts of supplies, the vast majority must be carried on ocean going vessels and unloaded at ports that may be at a great distance from the battlefield. As the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have shown, the costs of convoying vast quantities of supplies is tallied not only in economic terms but also in terms of lives lost in the movement of the materiel. As the ability of potential enemies to interdict movement to the battlefield and interdict movements in the battlespace increases, the challenge of logistics grows even larger. No matter how the nature of battle develops, logistics will remain a key factor.

Force Multiplying Technologies for Logistics Support to Military Operations explores Army logistics in a global, complex environment that includes the increasing use of antiaccess and area-denial tactics and technologies by potential adversaries. This report describes new technologies and systems that would reduce the demand for logistics and meet the demand at the point of need, make maintenance more efficient, improve inter- and intratheater mobility, and improve near-real-time, in-transit visibility. Force Multiplying Technologies also explores options for the Army to operate with the other services and improve its support of Special Operations Forces. This report provides a logistics-centric research and development investment strategy and illustrative examples of how improved logistics could look in the future.

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