National Academies Press: OpenBook

Biographical Memoirs: Volume 62 (1993)

Chapter: FIRST CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE NUTRITION PROGRAM AT CORNELL UNIVERSITY

« Previous: EARLY LIFE AND FORMATIVE YEARS
Suggested Citation:"FIRST CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE NUTRITION PROGRAM AT CORNELL UNIVERSITY." National Academy of Sciences. 1993. Biographical Memoirs: Volume 62. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2201.
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Page 299

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LEONARD AMBY MAYNARD 299 were being established. These endeavors may also have shaped his future concern with nutrition education of farmers and their families (1940). Maynard's academic career was interrupted by his period of military service. He served with the American Expeditionary Force in France in 1917 and continued with the World War I armed forces until 1919 when he was discharged, having served as a major in the Chemical Warfare Service (1972,2). FIRST CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE NUTRITION PROGRAM AT CORNELL UNIVERSITY Maynard obtained his first academic position at Cornell University in 1915, immediately after obtaining his Ph.D. It was then that Professor Elmer Seth Savage invited him to establish a laboratory for the study of nutrition in small animals. At that time Maynard also received an appointment as assistant professor of animal nutrition in the Department of Animal Husbandry in the New York State College of Agriculture. In 1920, after his discharge from the armed forces, he was promoted to a full professorship. In 1926, he took sabbatical leave and carried out studies at Yale University with Professor Lafayette Mendel. It was there that he met Clive McCay, who subsequently became his scientific collaborator at Cornell. Maynard's exposure to Mendel's method of teaching graduate students (by making them report on published scientific papers in biochemistry and nutrition) influenced his decision to employ this method in his own teaching at Cornell. In both institutions, the students had immediate feedback from the professor on their performance, which encouraged them to do the necessary homework thoroughly. This system of instruction is still used in Cornell's Division of Nutritional Sciences; indeed, these seminar performances

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Biographic Memoirs: Volume 62 contains the biographies of deceased members of the National Academy of Sciences and bibliographies of their published works. Each biographical essay was written by a member of the Academy familiar with the professional career of the deceased. For historical and bibliographical purposes, these volumes are worth returning to time and again.

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