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Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop (2017)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators

Kathryn Brinsfield, M.D., M.P.H., serves as the assistant secretary of health affairs and chief medical officer for the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS’s) Office of Health Affairs (OHA). She began her service with DHS in 2008 and previously served as director of the Division of Workforce Health and Medical Support within OHA. Before joining DHS, Dr. Brinsfield worked for various organizations, including Massachusetts Homeland Security, Boston Emergency Services (EMS), the Boston Metropolitan Medical Response System, and the del Valle Emergency Preparedness Training Institute. Dr. Brinsfield left Boston as an associate professor at the Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health with 13 years of experience as an attending physician at Boston City Hospital/Boston Medical Center. She worked for Boston EMS as director of research, training and quality improvements, medical director for special operations, and associate medical director. She chaired the American College of Emergency Physicians’ Disaster Committee, co-chaired the Massachusetts State Surge Committee, assisted in the creation of the Massachusetts Alternate Standards of Care Committee, and was the commander of the Massachusetts-1 Disaster Medical Assistance Team and a supervisory medical officer for the International Medical and Surgical Response Team, which responded to the September 11 attacks. She graduated with honors from Brown University and received her M.D. from Tufts School of Medicine and her M.P.H. from Boston University. She completed her residency in emergency medicine at Cook County Hospital in Chicago and her EMS fellowship at Boston EMS.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×

Mark Buttner, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Community Health Sciences, at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). He is the associate director of the UNLV Public Health Laboratory, director of the Pollen Monitoring Laboratory, and co-director of the Emerging Diseases Laboratory at UNLV. His research focuses on sampling and analysis of airborne microorganisms, with emphasis on enhanced detection methods of airborne and surface-associated microorganisms that are potential human health risks in indoor environments. Dr. Buttner also conducts research involving detection of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms and prevention of health care–associated infections. He served on the editorial board of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology and as an editor of the aerobiology section of the Manual of Environmental Microbiology. He currently serves as a member of the Standing Standard Project Committee, “Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality,” of the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Dr. Buttner received his Ph.D. in environmental science and health from the University of Nevada, Reno.

Matthew Davenport, Ph.D., is a program manager at the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), working in the areas of biothreat detection and biosurveillance. Dr. Davenport worked previously at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL), managing and working in multiple efforts in biodefense, biosurveillance, and biosciences. His work included projects in field-forward diagnostics, situational awareness of intentional and naturally occurring biological threats, personalized genomics, and functional biology. Dr. Davenport also worked in the areas of human performance and austere medicine with the military community. Prior to JHU/APL, Dr. Davenport had joined DHS S&T as a Science and Technology Policy Fellow from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, where he spent 7 years as a fellow and then as a program manager. At DHS, he established the DHS Public Safety Actionable Assay program and the Stakeholder Panel for Agent Detection Assays to develop voluntary consensus standards for the validation of biothreat detection technologies. Dr. Davenport also managed a number of bioinformatics efforts, including the development of new databases and software to identify signatures that can be used to specifically detect biothreat agents; sequencing strains of biothreats and their genetic near-neighbors; and application of next-generation sequencing to biothreat detection. In addition, Dr. Davenport served on numerous interagency committees and co-chaired a working group under the National Science and Technology Council that produced A National Strategy for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Standards.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×

Prior to DHS, he was a postdoctoral fellow split between the JHU School of Medicine and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, studying the biochemical mechanisms that control replication of the human genome and the repair of the genome when it becomes damaged. Dr. Davenport earned his doctorate from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a B.S. in microbiology from North Carolina State University.

John Fischer, Ph.D., is the director of the Chemical–Biological Defense Division of the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T). Dr. Fischer began his career with the U.S. Navy in 1984 as a research chemist in the Research Department at the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD), China Lake, California. His interests were in the development of new explosives, propellants, and non-linear optical materials. In 1990, he assumed the position of branch head in the Soldering Technology Branch; responsibilities included providing electronics assembly product assurance for the production of Navy missile and weapon systems. He also initiated an applied research and development (R&D) program to develop environmentally compliant materials and processes used in the production of U.S. Navy missiles. This effort resulted in Dr. Fischer being awarded the Environmental Protection Agency Stratospheric Ozone Layer Protection Award in 1993. In 1994, he was assigned as the head of the Chemistry and Materials Division at NAWCWD, where he was responsible for the basic and applied research of materials and processes for U.S. Navy missile and weapon systems. In 1996, he assumed the position of advanced technology manager for the Tomahawk Cruise Missile Project Office. Dr. Fischer led initiatives on identification of technology requirements for the Tomahawk missile and R&D programs to address these requirements, including transition of mature technology to Tomahawk production and deployment. Because of his experience with the Tomahawk weapon system, Dr. Fischer was named deputy of the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicle Advanced Development Project Office. His responsibilities included development of a new weapon system concept to address future requirements of naval aviation. Dr. Fischer was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in 1998. He served as the associate director of NAVAIR’s Science and Technology Office, and head of the Research Department at NAWCWD. In 2001, he was appointed director of the NAVAIR’s Science & Technology Office and was reassigned to the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division. In 2004, he assumed the position of civilian director of NAVAIR’s Research & Specialty Engineering Department, and in 2006, appointed civilian director of NAVAIR’s Systems Engineering Department. There, he was the lead for Naval Aviation Systems Engineering tasking and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×

functions for the complete life cycle of all aviation and aviation-related systems. In 2008, he was assigned the additional duty as NAVAIR’s chief technology officer. In 2009, Dr. Fischer was selected as the director of Defense Laboratory Programs within the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Research & Engineering). He was responsible for the development and implementation of policies for the Department of Defense’s laboratory system consisting of 62 laboratories in 22 states, with an annual budget of $30 billion. In 2015, he assumed the position of director, Chemical–Biological Defense Division within DHS S&T. The Division’s mission is to strengthen the nation’s security and resiliency by providing knowledge products and innovative technology solutions to enhance national preparedness against both current and future chemical and biological threats. This is accomplished through research and development programs in threat characterization, advanced agent/disease surveillance, agent detection, event attribution, and postevent response and restoration support. Dr. Fischer received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Northern Illinois University and a B.A. in chemistry from Lawrence University.

Kathy Forzley, M.P.A., is the health officer/manager of the Oakland County Health Division in Oakland County, Michigan. Ms. Forzley oversees more than 40 public health programs and initiatives serving a population of 1.2 million people. With a focus on population health improvement, Ms. Forzley has worked to align community partners and resources to address complex health issues. She also assumes a leadership role for health initiatives on a regional and statewide level through her participation on the executive committee for the Michigan Association of Local Public Health, Michigan Local Public Health Accreditation Commission, Southeastern Michigan Health Association Board, and Children’s Special Health Care Services Advisory Committee Stakeholder Group. In addition, she has served on the Detroit Area BioWatch Advisory Committee (BAC) since 2008 and is the current BAC chair. Prior to her current position, Ms. Forzley worked as a registered environmental health sanitarian and was the administrator of Oakland County Health Division’s Environmental Health Services. Ms. Forzley has worked in the field of public health for 24 years and offers a broad perspective in community collaboration–focused disease prevention and health promotion initiatives. Ms. Forzley has an M.P.A. and dual B.A. in biology and B.S. in environmental health degrees from Oakland University, Rochester Hills, Michigan.

Emily Gabriel, M.P.H., started her career in public health at the Boston Public Health Commission, directing the city’s Metropolitan Medical Response System out of Boston Emergency Medical Services. She was involved in the BioWatch program as a local stakeholder through that role.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×

She began her federal career in 2011 with the Office of Health Affairs in the Workforce Health and Medical Support Division, and joined the BioWatch program in 2013. Last summer, Ms. Gabriel deployed to Guinea on a detail with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and served as the deputy response lead for Guinea’s Ebola response. She currently serves as the BioWatch Public Health and Preparedness Director and is responsible for the program’s stakeholder facing activities surrounding preparedness and response, including exercises, guidance, communication, stakeholder engagement, and incident coordination. She holds an M.P.H. and a certificate in managing disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies from Boston University.

Lisa E. Gordon-Hagerty, M.P.H., is the president and CEO of LEG Inc., a boutique consulting firm providing strategic advice and counsel in domestic and national security and global energy issues, with particular emphasis in nuclear matters. She also serves as president of Tier Tech International, Inc. (TTI) a service-disabled, veteran-owned small business headquartered in McLean, Virginia. TTI’s primary focus is anti- and counterterrorism consulting providing expert policy and planning advice at the federal, state, and local levels for multijurisdictional counter-weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and critical infrastructure preparedness and response. Ms. Gordon-Hagerty serves as chair of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Standing Committee on Health Threats and Workforce Resilience, and as a member of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Global Security Strategic Advisory Group and the University of Michigan School of Public Health Dean’s Advisory Board. Since 2003, Ms. Gordon-Hagerty served as executive vice president and chief operating officer of USEC Inc., a leading supplier of enriched uranium fuel for commercial nuclear power plants. In that role, she was responsible for USEC’s day-to-day operations, including oversight of production, regulatory affairs, advanced technology, and its wholly owned subsidiary, NAC International, which specialized in nuclear materials transport, spent fuel storage and transport technologies, nuclear fuel cycle consulting, and fuel cycle information services. In 1998, Ms. Gordon-Hagerty joined the White House National Security Council staff, serving for more than 5 years as director for Combating Terrorism, overseeing and coordinating U.S. government activities to deter, disrupt, prevent, and respond fully to conventional, chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear terrorist attacks, through research and development, special operations, intelligence, and exercises/contingency planning. Previously, Ms. Gordon-Hagerty served for 6 years as the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) director of the Office of Emergency Response, leading efforts for emergency preparedness and technical/operational emergency response to all radiological or nuclear events. She also served as acting director, Office

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×

of Weapons Surety, and was responsible for the safety and security of the country’s nuclear weapons program. Prior to DOE, she served as a professional staff member of the U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Energy and Commerce. Ms. Gordon-Hagerty began her professional career as a physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Ms. Gordon-Hagerty is a director on the boards of Colombo Bank and the Federation of American Scientists and a member of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography advisory board; the Ridge Global LLC advisory board; the Council on Foreign Relations; the Economic Club of Washington, DC; and the Washington Institute of Foreign Affairs. She was named to Fortune magazine’s “Most Powerful Women” list in 2004, 2005, and 2006. She has been awarded many citations, including the first University of Michigan School of Public Health Outstanding Alumni Award, the Secretary of Defense Medal for Meritorious Civilian Service, the U.S. Secret Service Director’s Honor Award, and the Secretary of Energy’s Special Recognition Award. She holds a master’s degree in health physics and a B.S., both from the University of Michigan.

Julia E. Gunn, M.P.H., R.N., has worked for the Boston Public Health Commission in the Communicable Disease Control Division for more than 20 years, assuming the position of director in 2008. The division is responsible for the investigation, response, and control of all reportable infectious diseases, exposures, and clusters involving Boston residents and facilities. During this time she has contributed to dozens of publications and presentations enhancing the understanding of communicable disease surveillance and response, tuberculosis, foodborne illness, and other communicable illnesses. Ms. Gunn has played a key role in the development and integration of enhanced surveillance systems in Boston, including the syndromic surveillance system and electronic health record system. She is a member of the Boston Healthcare Preparedness Coalition and its executive committee.

Lieutenant Michelle Hohensee, M.T., ASCP, NCA, is a U.S. Public Health Service officer. She currently serves as the jurisdictional coordinator program lead for the BioWatch Program. Her last position before coming to the BioWatch Program was with Fort Belvoir Community Hospital in Virginia as a quality assurance manager for Transfusion Services. She also served with the U.S. Army as a laboratory officer before joining the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. She was the quality assurance manager/performance improvement officer for the Blood Donor Center in Fort Knox, Kentucky. In addition, she was the deputy director for Blood Services, while also being the department head for Transfusion Services and the department head for the Blood Donor Center at what was then the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC. Lt. Hohensee

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×

began her federal career with BioWatch in 2014. She holds a B.S. in medical laboratory science from Marquette University.

Terry Mullins, M.B.A., M.P.H., has served as chief of the Arizona Department of Health Services’ Bureau of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma System since 2006. In this position, Mr. Mullins manages the development, enhancement, and provision of a statewide system of emergency medical and trauma care. Since 2006, the number of trauma centers in Arizona has increased from 7 to 40, ensuring that most of the population now has rapid access to a designated trauma center. The trauma fatality rate in Arizona dropped 29 percent during this period. In addition, Arizona became one of the first states to create a mechanism to provide emergency medical services (EMS) agencies with hospital outcome data to help improve local quality improvement initiatives. Before his current position, Mr. Mullins managed the Trauma and EMS Technical Assistance Center at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC. In this role, he oversaw a national technical assistance center that worked directly with states, the District of Columbia, five freely associated territories, and multiple federal and national stakeholder organizations to enhance trauma and EMS systems. His EMS background includes 6 years of management in the ambulance industry and 13 years as a pre-hospital provider. During his EMS field career, Mr. Mullins filled various positions, including training officer, quality improvement officer, director of operations, and general manager. He has served as a member of various committees at the local, state, and national levels. He currently serves on the National EMS Advisory Council and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Standing Committee on Health Threats and Workforce Resilience. He received his initial emergency medical technician certification on San Juan Island, Washington, and his paramedic certification from Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Washington. He has an M.B.A. from the Thunderbird School of Global Management at Arizona State University and an M.P.H. from the University of Arizona.

Philip Newton serves as the policy advisor for Biological Preparedness, Homeland Defense Integration and Defense Support of Civil Authorities, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, Department of Defense (DoD). As a policy advisor serving under the deputy assistant secretary of defense for Homeland Defense Integration and Defense Support of Civil Authorities, Mr. Newton is responsible for the development, maintenance, coordination, and oversight for plans and policy for Defense Support of Civil Authorities, programs and budgets, within DoD components. Mr. Newton specifically focuses on pandemic influenza, infectious disease, and domestic biological preparedness and response, working with the inter-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×

agency to be prepared to respond to any natural or man-made disaster within the United States or its territories. He has served in this capacity since 2013.

Timothy M. Persons, Ph.D., was appointed the chief scientist of the Government Accountability Office (GAO) in 2008, making him a member of the federal Senior Executive Service. He also serves as a director for GAO’s Center for Science, Technology, and Engineering, a group of highly specialized scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and information technologists. In these roles he is an expert advisor and chief consultant to GAO, Congress, and other federal agencies and government programs on advanced analytics and cutting-edge science and technology, key highly specialized national and international systems, engineering policies, best practices, and original research studies in the fields of engineering, computer, and the physical and biological sciences. His goal is to ensure efficient, effective, and economical use of science and technology in government programs. He has led technology assessments and scientific studies for Congress on topics ranging from anthrax and high-containment laboratories, 3D printing, nanomanufacturing, biodetection systems, homeland security imaging and nuclear detection systems, freshwater conservation technologies, and climate engineering technologies. Prior to joining GAO, Dr. Persons held key leadership roles in the national security community. Dr. Persons is a recipient of a 2016 James Madison University (JMU) Distinguished Alumnus Award; a 2014 recipient of a GAO Distinguished Service Award; a 2012 recipient of the Arthur S. Flemming award in recognition of sustained outstanding and meritorious achievement within the federal government; and a 2012 recipient of GAO’s Big Picture Award for significant project achievement involving the ability to look longer, broader, and more strategically at key national or global issues. In 2007, Dr. Persons was awarded a Director of National Intelligence Science and Technology Fellowship focusing on computational imaging systems research. He was also selected as the JMU Physics Alumnus of 2007. He has also served as a radiation physicist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is a member of the board of the Senior Executives Association, a senior member of the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers, a council member (ex officio) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Government–University–Industry Research Roundtable as well as the World Future Society Global Advisory Council, and has authored or co-authored an array of journal, conference, and technical articles. He received his B.Sc. in physics from JMU, an M.Sc. in nuclear physics from Emory University, and an M.Sc. in computer science and a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Wake Forest University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×

Roger Pollok began his career with the City of San Antonio Metropolitan Health District in 1991, analyzing HIV and chlamydia specimens in the serology section of the laboratory. He cross-trained over the next 7 years and became certified with the Food and Drug Administration’s Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments, the Texas Department of State Health Services, and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to perform analytical responsibilities in every laboratory section. In 1999, he became the laboratory manager with a charge in developing a new laboratory section known as the Laboratory Response Network (LRN) Bio-Terrorism Lab. It was constructed in the downtown lab. Shortly after the 9/11 attacks, this lab received more than 1,400 specimens associated with the anthrax scare. In 2004, a new construction project was initiated to build a new BioSafety Level 3 Laboratory, a BioWatch lab, and supporting labs, as part of the LRN at Brooks Air Force Base, now known as Brooks City Base. In 2005, Mr. Pollok transitioned to oversee San Antonio’s Public Health Emergency Preparedness Division, with a mission to develop Health/Medical All-Hazards Plans to support Annex H, and respond to public health emergencies within San Antonio/Bexar County. Over the past 10 years as the emergency preparedness coordinator, Mr. Pollok has responded to numerous biothreat incidents, both man-made and naturally occurring; to Category A agents; and to emerging infectious diseases such as West Nile Virus, Chikungunya, and others. He has provided health/medical coordination and resources to individuals affected by major flooding, highconsequence fire evacuations, and large-scale hurricane-sheltering operations. He has been involved in the development of response plans for those viruses/bacteria associated with high-consequence disease planning, such as Zika virus, Ebola, BioWatch, Yersinia pestis (plague), smallpox, H5N1/H7N9 influenza, and the like. In 2015, he was appointed interim assistant director of health to oversee the Environmental Safety Division. This division consists of Emergency Preparedness, Laboratory, Food and Environmental, Public Center for Environmental Health (BioWatch), Built Environments, and Community Health.

Albert J. Romanosky, M.D., Ph.D., joined the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene 10 years ago after a full-time practice in emergency medicine. He is currently the medical director and state emergency preparedness coordinator in the department’s Office of Preparedness and Response. As a member of the lead agency for Emergency Support Function 8: Public Health and Medical, Dr. Romanosky has actively supported state health department emergency preparedness planning and response for public health emergencies. He has been involved with several recognized achievements, including (1) development of the Pan Flu Continuity of Operations Task Force, which brings together representatives of private,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×

critical infrastructure organizations in a public–private partnership to foster collaborative and cooperative emergency preparedness planning and response; this endeavor is considered a national best practice as a result of innovative aspects of this workgroup; (2) recipient of the American Red Cross Community Service Award for the Mid-Atlantic Region for overseeing the design and conduct of the 2007 and 2008 Maryland Statewide Pandemic Influenza Exercises; and (3) co-author of the Maryland State Pandemic Influenza Operational Plan for Critical Infrastructure, Key Resources and Critical Manufacturing, which received the highest evaluation score by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reviewers. In addition, Dr. Romanosky has been actively involved with emergency medical services as a jurisdictional medical director, assistant medical director for one of the nation’s first Tactical Emergency Medical Services Teams, weapons of mass destruction and emergency response subject-matter expert, and instructor for the State Department’s Anti-Terrorism Assistance Program as well as an instructor in advanced cardiac life support, advanced trauma life support, and pediatric life support programs. He is currently a faculty member in the Department of Pediatric Surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Romanosky has a Ph.D. in human physiology from Pennsylvania State University and an M.D. from Louisiana State University. He is board certified in internal, emergency, and disaster medicine. He is one of a few physicians recently board certified in the new field of disaster medicine and recently elected to the American Board of Disaster Medicine. After completing an internal medicine residency at the University of Maryland Medical System, he worked in several regional emergency departments.

Wendy (Cameron) Smith, M.P.H., M.A., is the epidemiology preparedness director at the Georgia Department of Public Health. She leads the Syndromic Surveillance Program and participates in a wide variety of novel surveillance projects, planning for the epidemiologic support of novel infectious disease events and outbreaks, and related training and exercise activities in the epidemiology and preparedness sections for naturally occurring or human-caused diseases and environmental events with public health impacts. She has been Georgia’s BioWatch/Health Security Advisory Committee chairperson since 2012. She earned her B.A. in cultural anthropology from the University of Akron. She earned her M.P.H. at the University of Akron, a partner school in the Consortium of Eastern Ohio Master’s of Public Health programs. She earned her M.A. in security studies (Homeland Security and Defense) from the Center for Homeland Defense and Security at the Naval Postgraduate School.

John Vitko, Jr., Ph.D., is the former director of Biological and Chemical Countermeasures for the Department of Homeland Security, Science and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×

Technology Directorate (DHS S&T). In that role, he had overall responsibility for all of DHS S&T to deter, detect, or mitigate a biological or chemical attack on the people, infrastructure, or agriculture of the United States. Prior to that, Dr. Vitko was a director of Exploratory Systems at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California, where he had worked since receiving his Ph.D. in physics from Cornell University. Trained as a solid state physicist and spectroscopist, Dr. Vitko has conducted basic and applied research in support of defense and energy programs; led a major portion of Sandia’s Strategic Defense Programs in the 1980s; been the technical director of a multilaboratory Department of Energy (DOE) program on the use of unmanned aerospace vehicles for climate research in the 1990s; played a formative role in many advanced detection technology programs at Sandia, ranging from lidars to a handheld suite of chromatography labs known as µChemLab; led all of Sandia’s biological and chemical defense programs; served as coordinator for the Detection Thrust Area of DOE’s multilaboratory Chemical and Biological Non-Proliferation Program; and was the DOE representative to the multiagency ChemBio Detection Roadmapping Committee. In 2002, he went on temporary assignment to Washington, DC, to help in the planning stages for DHS and has subsequently joined that agency on an Interagency Personnel Agreement status. Dr. Vitko also chaired a National Research Council study on Advanced Sensors for Bio-agent Detection. He now serves as the rector at St. Luke Serbian Orthodox Church in McLean, Virginia.

Michael V. Walter, Ph.D., joined the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS’s) Office of Health Affairs as the BioWatch program manager in 2009. Since joining BioWatch, Dr. Walter has instituted a robust quality assurance program. Working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), he directed the transition of BioWatch sample screening from CDC polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to Department of Defense Critical Reagent Program PCR reagents. Additionally, he has overseen the successful completion of the Gen-3 Phase I Acquisition Program. He has worked to increase interoperability and partnerships with federal, state, and local BioWatch program stakeholders. He was recognized as “One of the Faces of Homeland Security” by DHS secretary Janet Napolitano in 2011. Dr. Walter possesses more than 20 years of experience in microbiology/biological warfare research. He has an extensive background in sampling and detection for aerosolized microorganisms, as well as in the management and development of design, testing, evaluation, and quality assurance for related systems and programs. He also has significant experience in laboratory assay development, testing, and evaluation. Prior to joining BioWatch, Dr. Walter was a staff senior scientist and headed the Technology Special Project Team for the Department of Defense Joint Program Executive Office

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×

for Chemical and Biological Defense. He has also held positions with the Central Intelligence Agency, the Naval Surface Warfare Center, and Texaco, Inc. Dr. Walter is the recipient of eight publication and innovation awards, and the author of numerous scientific articles, abstracts, and patents. He received his Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of North Dakota.

Sandy Wedgeworth, M.P.A., is the director of the Public Health Emergency Management Program at the City of Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services. She began her career at the Long Beach Health Department in 1999 working in various programs, including HIV/AIDS prevention, teen pregnancy prevention, and workforce development. In her current role, she oversees her department’s emergency response programs, including the Public Health Emergency Preparedness Program, Pandemic Influenza Program, Urban Area Security Initiative grant projects, and risk communication. Additionally, she is the chair of the Long Beach BioWatch Advisory Committee. She has participated in and coordinated various disaster management and response tabletop and full-scale exercises. She is a member of the California Department of Public Health’s Southern California regional exercise planning team. She also participates in several operational area emergency management planning groups. Ms. Wedgeworth has an M.P.A. from California State University, Long Beach.

Jody R. Wireman, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., M.P.A., CIH, is the director, Force Health Protection (FHP) Division, at the North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Northern Command (USNORTHCOM) at the Department of Defense. In this position, Dr. Wireman provides leadership, management, and expertise in occupational, environmental, and chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) force health protection for homeland defense and civil support missions. He directly supports the development of deliberate and crisis action plans for his USNORTHCOM Area of Responsibility, including determining resource requirements and developing viable solutions to meet those requirements. Prior to this position, Dr. Wireman was the deputy division chief of the FHP division at USNORTHCOM. He received his Ph.D. in environmental toxicology from Texas Tech University, his M.P.A. from the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government, and his M.S.P.H. from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
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Page 92
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
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Page 93
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
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Page 94
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
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Page 95
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers and Moderators." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Enhancing BioWatch Capabilities Through Technology and Collaboration: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23687.
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The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS's) BioWatch program aims to provide an early indication of an aerosolized biological weapon attack. The first generation of BioWatch air samplers were deployed in 2003. The current version of this technology, referred to as Generation 2 (Gen-2), uses daily manual collection and testing of air filters from each monitor, a process that can take 12 to 36 hours to detect the presence of biological pathogens. Until April 2014, DHS pursued a next-generation autonomous detection technology that aimed to shorten the time from sample collection to detection to less than 6 hours, reduce the cost of analysis, and increase the number of detectable biological pathogens. Because of concerns about the cost and effectiveness of the proposed Generation 3 system (Gen-3), DHS cancelled its acquisition plans for the next-generation surveillance system.

In response to the cancellation announcement, Congress asked the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to conduct a review of the program and the proposed system enhancements that would have been incorporated in BioWatch Gen-3. However, Mike Walter, BioWatch Program manager, Office of Health Affairs, DHS, said that DHS did not agree with all of GAO's characterizations of the BioWatch program efforts described in this review. In response to this, DHS requested that the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine conduct a workshop to further explore the findings of the 2015 GAO report and discuss the impact these findings may have with regard to the future development of the technical capabilities of the BioWatch program. Workshop participants also discussed existing and possible collaborations between BioWatch, public health laboratories, and other stakeholders that could contribute to the enhancement of biosurveillance capabilities at the federal, state, and local levels. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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