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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
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Appendix G

Biographical Information

STUDY COMMITTEE

JARED LEIGH COHON (NAE), Co-Chair, served as the eighth president of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He is currently a university professor in the Carnegie Mellon College of Engineering. He holds a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Pennsylvania and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, earned in 1972 and 1973, respectively. Prior to Carnegie Mellon, Cohon was the dean of the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and professor of environmental systems analysis at Yale University from 1992 to 1997 and was a faculty member in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering and assistant and associate dean of engineering and vice provost for research at Johns Hopkins University from 1973 to 1992. Cohon stepped down from his position as president of Carnegie Mellon in 2013 and returned to the faculty as a university professor in the Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy and director of the Wilton E. Scott Institute for Energy Innovation. In 2014 Carnegie Mellon announced that the University Center would be renamed in honor of President Cohon and will be called the Cohon University Center.

SUSANNE E. HAMBRUSCH, Co-Chair, is professor of computer sciences at Purdue University. She received the Diplom Ingenieur in computer science from the Technical University of Vienna, Austria, in 1977, and a Ph.D. in computer science from Penn State in 1982. In 1982 she joined the faculty at Purdue University. She served as the department head of the Computer Science Department from 2002 to 2007. She has held visiting appointments at the Technical University of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×

Graz, Austria, and the International Computer Science Institute at the University of California, Berkeley. From 2010 to 2013 she served as the director of the Computing and Communication Foundations Division in the CISE Directorate at National Science Foundation (NSF), where she successfully led the development of several new crosscutting programs including Cyber-Enabled Sustainability Science and Engineering and Exploiting Parallelism and Scalability, and the U.S.-Israel Collaboration in Computer Science.

M. BRIAN BLAKE Ph.D. is executive vice president for academic affairs and provost at Drexel University. As the highest ranking academic officer, he oversees all academic programs across the 15 schools and colleges and over 26,000 students. Blake came to Drexel from the University of Miami, where he set research and teaching priorities and led faculty enhancement efforts as vice provost for academic affairs, and oversaw 155 graduate programs serving more than 5,700 students as dean of the Graduate School. Previously, he was associate dean for research and graduate studies at the University of Notre Dame College of Engineering, and chaired the Georgetown University Department of Computer Science as it launched its first graduate program. Blake has directed computer science labs funded by more than $10 million in sponsored research awards; authored 170-plus publications and chaired six conferences; edited major journals including his current service as editor-in-chief of IEEE Internet Computing; and advised dozens of students at every level from post-doctoral fellowships through doctoral, master’s, and undergraduate studies. Blake is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and an Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) distinguished scientist. Blake’s industry experience includes 6 years as a software engineer and architect at Lockheed Martin, General Dynamics, and the MITRE Corporation before entering academia full time. Blake also holds appointments in the College of Engineering (as professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering) and in the College of Medicine (as professor of neuroengineering).

TRACY CAMP is department head and professor in the Department of Computer Science at the Colorado School of Mines. Her current research interests include the credibility of ad hoc network simulation studies and the use of wireless sensor networks in geosystems. Dr. Camp is an ACM fellow, an ACM distinguished lecturer, and an IEEE senior member. She has enjoyed being a Fulbright scholar in New Zealand (in 2006) and a distinguished visitor at the University of Bonn, Germany (in 2010). In 2007 Dr. Camp received the Board of Trustees Outstanding Faculty Award at the Colorado School of Mines; this award was given only five times between 1998 and 2007. Dr. Camp is currently chairing a Computing Research Association (CRA) committee addressing the booming enrollments in undergraduate computer science courses, and is currently co-chair of the Computing Research Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in Computing

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×

Research (CRA-W). She received her Ph.D. in computer science from the College of William & Mary.

DAVID E. CULLER (NAE) received his B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1980, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from MIT in 1985 and 1989, respectively. He joined the EECS faculty in 1989 and is the founding director of Intel Research, UC Berkeley, and was associate chair of the EECS Department from 2010 to 2012 and chair from 2012 to 2014. He won the Okawa Prize in 2013. He is a member of the NAE, an ACM fellow, and an IEEE fellow. He has been named one of Scientific American’s Top 50 researchers and the creator of one of MIT’s Technology Review’s 10 Technologies That Will Change the World. He was awarded the NSF Presidential Young Investigator and the Presidential Faculty Fellowship. His research addresses networks of small, embedded wireless devices; planetary-scale Internet services; parallel computer architecture; parallel programming languages; and high-performance communication. This includes TinyOS, Berkeley Motes, PlanetLab, Networks of Workstations (NOW), Internet services, Active Messages, Split-C, and the Threaded Abstract Machine (TAM).

SUSAN B. DAVIDSON is a computer scientist known for her work in databases and bioinformatics. She is currently Weiss Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania. Her dissertation work on distributed databases included results on statistical and mathematical techniques for data resolution as well as mechanisms to avoid database conflicts. Davidson has also done research in bioinformatics, where her work (with collaborators) on data integration was commercialized by GeneticXChange. She is also currently serving on the board of the Computing Research Association. She received her Ph.D. in computer science from Princeton University.

BRIAN K. FITZGERALD serves as the CEO of the Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF), developing long-term strategy for the membership organization. Under Dr. Fitzgerald’s leadership, BHEF’s National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative (HEWI) has emerged as the organization’s strategic enterprise. Through BHEF member collaboration HEWI includes regional projects focused on business–higher education partnerships in selected states, as well as national networks that disseminate insights and scale effective practices. HEWI deploys a model of strategic business engagement in higher education to address members’ high-skill, high-priority workforce needs. The Wall Street Journal featured BHEF and its work in a front-page article, and the NSF recognized HEWI’s success with a 5-year, $4.5 million grant to increase persistence and diversity in undergraduate STEM education. Dr. Fitzgerald earned his master’s and doctoral degrees from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where he also served on the alumni council for 4 years and as its chair. He currently serves on the Dean’s Leadership Council. He received his bachelor’s degree from the Massachusetts College

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×

of Liberal Arts, which named him distinguished alumnus and awarded him an honorary doctorate in public service.

ANN Q. GATES is professor and chair of the Computer Science Department at the University of Texas, El Paso. Her areas of research are in software engineering and cyberinfrastructure, with an emphasis on workflows, ontologies, and formal software specification. Gates directs the NSF-funded Cyber-ShARE Center, which focuses on developing and sharing resources through cyberinfrastructure to advance research and education in science. She was a founding member of the NSF Advisory Committee for Cyber-infrastructure. Gates served on the IEEE-Computer Society (IEEE-CS) Board of Governors from 2004 to 2009. In addition she chairs the IEEE-CS Educational Activity Board’s Committee of Diversity and External Activities and has established a model for specialized student chapters focused on leadership, entrepreneurship, and professional development. She is a member of the Computer Science Accreditation Board (2011-2013). Gates leads the Computing Alliance for Hispanic-Serving Institutions and is a founding member of the National Center for Women in Information Technology. In 2010 Gates received the Anita Borg Institute Social Impact Award and the 2009 Richard A. Tapia Achievement Award for Scientific Scholarship, Civic Science, and Diversifying Computing, and was named to Hispanic Business magazine’s 100 Influential Hispanics in 2006 for her work on the Affinity Research Group model.

CHARLES ISBELL has been a leader in education efforts both at Georgia Tech’s College of Computing, where he is senior associate dean for academic affairs, and nationally, where he co-chairs the Computing Research Association’s Subcommittee on Education. At Georgia Tech Dr. Isbell was one of the co-leaders of the Threads reform of the undergraduate computing curriculum. Threads was a successful, comprehensive restructuring of the computing curriculum that provided a cohesive, coordinated set of contexts—or threads—for teaching and learning computing skills, with a goal of making computing more inclusive, relevant, and exciting for a much broader student audience. Dr. Isbell has won numerous teaching awards. Dr. Isbell received his Ph.D. from MIT’s AI Lab (now CSAIL). His research focuses on artificial intelligence and machine learning.

CLAS A. JACOBSON is chief scientist, controls, for United Technologies Corporation (UTC). In this role he works with the UTC business units to provide advice on controls technology in both products as well as development processes to enhance product quality, functionality, and engineering effectiveness. Prior to his role as chief scientist he has worked at United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) in management and scientific positions since 1995. He was director of the Carrier Program Office. He also was director of the Systems Department at UTRC, responsible for 140 staff working in the systems engineering areas emphasizing mathematical modeling and analysis. Dr. Jacobson received his Ph.D.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×

in electrical engineering in 1986 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He was an associate professor at Northeastern University in Boston from 1986 to 1995 and conducted research in control systems.

MICHAEL S. McPHERSON is president emeritus of the Spencer Foundation, a private foundation that grants funds to support research that will contribute to the understanding of education and the improvement of its practice. Prior to joining the foundation in 2003 he served as president of Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, for 7 years. A nationally known economist whose expertise focuses on the interplay between education and economics, McPherson spent the 22 years prior to his Macalester presidency as professor of economics, chairman of the Economics Department, and dean of faculty at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. He holds a B.A. in mathematics, an M.A. in economics, and a Ph.D. in economics, all from the University of Chicago. He has served as a trustee of the College Board, the American Council on Education, and Wesleyan University. He was a fellow of the Institute for Advanced Study and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

ERIC ROBERTS received his Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Harvard University in 1980 and went on to teach at Wellesley College from 1980 to 1985, where he chaired the Computer Science Department. From 1985 to 1990, he was a member of the research staff at Digital Equipment Corporation’s Systems Research Center in Palo Alto, California, where his research focused on programming tools for multiprocessor architectures. In 1990 Roberts joined the Stanford faculty, where he is now a professor of computer science and a Bass University fellow in undergraduate education. From 1990 to 2002 Professor Roberts was associate chair and director of Undergraduate Studies for Computer Science. In that capacity he was the principal architect of Stanford’s introductory programming sequence. He has written six computer science textbooks that are used at many colleges and universities throughout the world. His current research focuses on computer science education, particularly for underserved communities. From 1998 to 2005 Roberts directed the Bermuda Project, which developed the computer science curriculum for Bermuda’s public secondary schools.

VALERIE TAYLOR is the director of the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. Prior to joining Argonne, she held multiple leadership roles as a faculty at Texas A&M University. Most recently, she served as the senior associate dean of academic affairs in the College of Engineering, a Regents Professor, and the Royce E. Wisenbaker Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. Prior to that, she served as head of Computer Science and Engineering from 2003 until 2011. Before joining Texas A&M, Dr. Taylor was a faculty member in Northwestern University’s Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department for 11 years. Dr. Taylor

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×

has authored or coauthored over 100 papers on high performance computing. She has developed and used models to analyze and improve the performance of many parallel, scientific applications, including finite element applications, molecular dynamics, cosmology, earthquake simulations, ocean modeling, and magnetic fusion. Dr. Taylor is a fellow of the IEEE and of the ACM. She has received numerous awards for distinguished research and leadership, including the 2001 IEEE Harriet B. Rigas Award for significant contributions in engineering education; the 2002 Outstanding Young Engineering Alumni Award from the University of California at Berkeley; the 2002 A. Nico Habermann Award for increasing diversity in computing; and the 2005 Tapia Achievement Award for Scientific Scholarship, Civic Science, and Diversifying Computing. She is also the Executive Director of the Center for Minorities and People with Disabilities in Information Technology (CMD-IT). Dr. Taylor earned her bachelor’s degree in electrical and computer engineering and master’s degree in computer engineering from Purdue University in 1985 and 1986, respectively. She received her Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of California at Berkeley in 1991.

JODI TIMS is a professor of computer science at Baldwin Wallace University in Berea, Ohio, a liberal arts-based college with approximately 3000 undergraduate students and a student-faculty ratio of approximately 13:1. She is currently serving as chair of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. She began teaching at the university level in 1982 at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown (UPJ) as an instructor of mathematics. Upon completing her M.S. in computer science at the University of Pittsburgh in 1988, Dr. Tims became an assistant professor of computer science at UPJ. In 1992 she received the Edward A. Vizzini Natural Science Division Award for Excellence in Teaching and in 1994 was tenured and promoted to associate professor. After earning her Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Pittsburgh, with an emphasis on programming languages and compilation for distributed memory parallel systems, she accepted a position as associate professor and coordinator of computer science at Saint Francis University, Loretto, Pennsylvania. She accepted her current position at Baldwin Wallace in 2002 and was promoted to full professor in 2004. In addition to her teaching and administrative responsibilities, she serves on numerous college-wide committees, is a member of the Regional Information Technology Engagement board of Northeast Ohio, and is a member of the ACM-W executive council, leading the Regional Celebrations of Women in Computing project. She served as program chair for the Ohio Celebration of Women in Computing (OCWiC) held in 2009 and 2011 and general chair of that event for OCWiC 2013, and is now serving as chair of the newly formed OCWiC executive board.

SARAH E. TURNER is the chair of the Department of Economics at the University of Virginia. Dr. Turner specializes in research on the economics of edu-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×

cation in the United States. She has written extensively on the economics of higher education, including the behavioral effects of financial aid policies and the entry of new providers. She has served as a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation, and received the Milken Institute Award for Distinguished Economic Research, “Trade in University Training.” Some of her recent research has addressed the labor market for IT workers and college enrollment during the Great Recession. She received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

STAFF

EMILY GRUMBLING is a program officer with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She previously served as an AAAS Science and Technology Policy fellow in the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering at the National Science Foundation (2012-2014), and as an American Chemical Society (ACS) congressional fellow in the U.S. House of Representatives (2011-2012). Dr. Grumbling currently serves as a volunteer associate of the ACS Committee on Environmental Improvement. She received her Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Arizona in 2010 and her B.A. with a double major in chemistry and film/electronic media arts from Bard College in 2004.

JON EISENBERG is director of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies. He has also been study director for a diverse body of work, including a series of studies exploring Internet and broadband policy and networking and communications technologies. From 1995 to 1997 he was an AAAS Science, Engineering, and Diplomacy fellow at the U.S. Agency for International Development, where he worked on technology transfer and information and telecommunications policy issues. Dr. Eisenberg received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Washington in 1996 and B.S. in physics with honors from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1988.

KATIRIA ORTIZ is a research associate with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She previously served as an intern for the Federal Bureau of Investigation and as an undergraduate research assistant at the Cybersecurity Quantification Laboratory at the University of Maryland, College Park. She received her M.A. in international science and technology policy from The George Washington University and her B.S. in cell biology and molecular genetics and B.A. in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Maryland, College Park.

TOM RUDIN is the Director of the Board on Higher Education and Workforce at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine—a position

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×

he assumed in mid-August 2014. Prior to joining the Academies, Mr. Rudin served as senior vice president for career readiness and senior vice president for advocacy, government relations and development at the College Board from 2006-2014. He was also vice president for government relations from 2004-2006 and executive director of grants planning and management from 1996-2004 at the College Board. Before joining the College Board, Mr. Rudin was a policy analyst at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

In 1991, Mr. Rudin taught courses in U.S. public policy, human rights, and organizational management as a visiting instructor at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. In the early 1980s, he directed the work of the Governor’s Task Force on Science and Technology for North Carolina Governor James B. Hunt, Jr., where he was involved in several new state initiatives, such as the North Carolina Biotechnology Center and the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics. He received a B.A. degree from Purdue University, and he holds master’s degrees in public administration and in social work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24926.
×
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The field of computer science (CS) is currently experiencing a surge in undergraduate degree production and course enrollments, which is straining program resources at many institutions and causing concern among faculty and administrators about how best to respond to the rapidly growing demand. There is also significant interest about what this growth will mean for the future of CS programs, the role of computer science in academic institutions, the field as a whole, and U.S. society more broadly.

Assessing and Responding to the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments seeks to provide a better understanding of the current trends in computing enrollments in the context of past trends. It examines drivers of the current enrollment surge, relationships between the surge and current and potential gains in diversity in the field, and the potential impacts of responses to the increased demand for computing in higher education, and it considers the likely effects of those responses on students, faculty, and institutions. This report provides recommendations for what institutions of higher education, government agencies, and the private sector can do to respond to the surge and plan for a strong and sustainable future for the field of CS in general, the health of the institutions of higher education, and the prosperity of the nation.

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