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Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships (2021)

Chapter:Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
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Appendix C

Committee Member and Staff Biographies

Christopher A. Scott (Chair) is the director of the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy and research professor of water resources policy, with joint appointments as professor in the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona as well as director of the Consortium for Arizona–Mexico Arid Environments and joint professor of hydrology and atmospheric sciences in the College of Science. In 2021, he moved to Pennsylvania State University, where he was named Maurice Goddard Chair of Forestry and Environmental Conservation and professor in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management. His work focuses on the policy dimensions of global climate change and urban growth, with particular emphasis on water and energy security, climate adaptation, urban wastewater and water reuse, agricultural-urban water transfers, and transboundary water resources. He is founding codirector of the AQUASEC Center of Excellence for Water Security. He has bilingual proficiency in Spanish and Hindi, and professional working proficiency in Portuguese, Nepali, and German. Prior to joining the University of Arizona, he was a senior international project manager with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, where he led the National Weather Service collaboration with Mexico and India. Scott holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. in hydrology from Cornell University, and B.S. and B.A. degrees from Swarthmore College.

Anthony Bebbington is international director for Natural Resources and Climate Change at the Ford Foundation, Milton P. and Alice C. Higgins Professor of Environment and Society in the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University, USA (on leave), and professorial fellow at the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×

University of Manchester, UK. His research and teaching focuses on environmental governance, socioenvironmental conflicts, resource extraction, and community rights, primarily in Latin America. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a director of Oxfam America, and a distinguished professor at the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences, Ecuador. He has been a Guggenheim fellow, an Australian Research Council Laureate fellow, fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences, at Stanford University, and a social scientist at the World Bank. Additionally, he has served on numerous National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine panels. Recent books include Governing Extractive Industries: Politics, Histories, Ideas, Subterranean Struggles: New Dynamics of Mining, Oil and Gas in Latin America, and the collection Impacts of Extractive Industry and Infrastructure on Forests, Climate and Land Use Alliance. Bebbington earned his Ph.D. in geography from Clark University.

Alfonso Andrés Cortez-Lara has been a tenured professor and researcher at El Colegio de la Frontera Norte since 1993. He is a member of the System of National Researchers Level II (SNI II-Conacyt). His most recent book covers the issue of transboundary water conflicts in the Lower Colorado River Basin. He is currently a cosponsor researcher for two studies: Democratización de las instancias de toma de decisiones sobre aguas y cuencas en México, which concerns water and basins in Mexico, and Los trasvases como dispositivos de desigualdad e inseguridad hídrica; Prácticas colectivas para la justicia hídrica, which concerns water inequality and water justice. Cortez-Lara has a Ph.D. in resource development (water resources management) from Michigan State University.

Alma Cota De Yañez is the executive director for Fundación del Empresariado Sonorense, A.C., Nogales (FESAC). Since assuming this position in 2003, she has helped FESAC become the local leader in mobilizing resources and philanthropy efforts for individual and corporate donors, government agencies, and nongovernmental organizationa (NGOs) providing support to improverished communities in the border towns of Nogales, Mexico, and Nogales, Arizona. She began working with NGOs as a part-time translator for Save the Children during her university studies. She graduated from the Global Women’s Leadership Network international training program in 2005, and in 2007 completed an international senior fellowship with the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society. Throughout her career, she has worked to provide training programs, nutritional services, self-employment guidance, and support for people with disabilities, often working with migrant workers and their families. Cota de Yañez has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the Technological Institute of Monterrey.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×

Hallie C. Eakin is a professor at Arizona State University in the School of Sustainability and an affiliated professor in the School of Urban Planning and Geographical Sciences as well as the School for the Future of Innovation in Society. Eakin’s research interests include household vulnerability and the sustainability of adaptations to global change, social-ecological resilience and transformation, urban resilience planning and governance, social justice concerns associated with global change, the governance of telecoupled systems, sustainable food systems, agricultural change, and food sovereignty. Eakin’s most recent work has explored the implications for social vulnerability of water infrastructure decision making in Mexico City, a National Science Foundation project implemented in collaboration with the Laboratory for Sustainability Sciences of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México in Mexico City. She received her Ph.D. in geography from the University of Arizona and completed postdoctoral fellowships at the U.S.–Mexican Studies Center, University of California-San Diego, and the Centro de Ciencias de la Atmósfera, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

Constantino de Jesús Macías Garcia is a professor and former director (2016–2020) of the Instituto de Ecología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) where he oversees the work of the National Laboratory for Sustainability Sciences and has been involved in proposals to strengthen collaboration between his university and the universities of Arizona and Agadir (Morocco) to work on arid-land sustainability. His main research area has been evolution through sexual selection and its impact on the generation of new species, focusing on Mexican native fish, but increasingly he has been working to understand how animals adapt to habitats modified by humans where the main study system has been urban birds, working on how they adapt their song attributes/behavior to urban noise, and how they use anthropogenic materials to build their nests and with what consequences. He is the associate editor of Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology and is a referee for many scientific journals. Macías Garcia is a member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences. He earned a B.Sc. and M.Sc. in biology at the UNAM School of Sciences and a Ph.D. from the University of East Anglia, Norwich, in animal behavior.

Natalia Martínez Tagüeña is an environmental anthropologist and archaeologist doing research at the Consorcio de Investigación, Innovación y Desarrollo para las Zonas Áridas, located at the Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica in San Luis Potosí, México. The goal of the partnership in the institute is to conduct transdisciplinary and participatory research for the sustainable use of natural resources in arid lands. Her research interests have a regional focus on arid lands, particularly at

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×

the Sonoran Desert, while studying diverse topics including the employment of past information to better understand subsistence and climate change today, transitions from mobile to sedentary lifeways, coastal adaptations, ethno-ecology, traditional knowledge, cultural landscapes, and socio-ecological systems. She conducts community-based and participatory research enriched by collaboration, where different epistemologies are integrated to achieve co-produced knowledge. Martínez Tagüeña received her Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Arizona in Tucson.

Roger S. Pulwarty is a senior scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Earth System Research Laboratory Physical Sciences Division in Boulder, Colorado, as well as adjunct professor to the University of Colorado and the University of the West Indies, Barbados. He has extensive experience working with Native American communities and protected areas in the Southwest United States/Northwest Mexico region, and on transboundary water resources and research networks to support adaptive management on the Colorado River between the United States and Mexico. Pulwarty has developed and led multidisciplinary programs for the U.S. National Integrated Drought Information System; NOAA Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments; the World Meteorological Organization Climate Services Information System; and the Global Environment Facility Mainstreaming Adaptation in the Caribbean. He is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society and of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. He is the coeditor of Drought and Water Crises, Drought in the Anthropocene, and the U.N. Office for Disaster Risk Reduction’s special global assessment report on drought. Pulwarty earned his Ph.D. in geography from Colorado University, Boulder.

Exequiel Rolón is sustainability manager of Fresnillo PLC, the world leader in silver mining, where he is responsible for the social performance of the company. He works closely with operations and development projects to engage and build trust with neighboring communities. In addition, he manages sustainability reporting and leads the initiatives to foster diversity and embed ethics in the organizational culture. Prior to Fresnillo PLC, he was a consultant on projects in Canada, Peru, the Dominican Republic, and Madagascar. He currently serves as a board member of the Center for Leadership Ethics of the University of Arizona and the World Environment Center. He also participates in the sustainability initiative of the Silver Institute and regularly speaks at conferences and events on sustainability and community relations. Rolón received his B.S. in civil engineering from Universidad Panamericana, an M.Sc. in geomatics from Université Laval, and an M.B.A. from HEC Montreal.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×

Kelly T. Sanders is an associate professor in the University of Southern California’s Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Her research aims to ease tensions between human and natural systems through technical, regulatory, and market interventions, with particular emphasis on reducing the environmental impacts of providing energy and water services. She has authored more than two dozen publications and has given dozens of invited talks on topics at the intersection of engineering, science, and policy. Sanders has been recognized in Forbes’ “30 under 30 in Energy” and MIT Technology Review’s “35 Innovators Under 35” for her contributions to the energy field. Sanders received her B.S. in bioengineering from Pennsylvania State University, as well as M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering and environmental engineering from the University of Texas at Austin, respectively.

Elisabeth Huber-Sannwald is a research professor in the Division of Environmental Sciences at the Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Her expertise is in dryland ecosystem ecology with a focus on diversity and the functioning of plants, biocrusts, soil microorganisms and their role in ecohydrological and bio-geochemical processes under the influence of global and social changes. Over the past 17 years, her studies have addressed the mechanisms underpinning the integrity of socio-ecological systems and the ways dryland resilience is linked to the nexus of ecosystem services, human well-being, and sustainable development. Her research is inter- and transdisciplinary spreading across a complex systems approach, participatory research, field experimentation, and long-term socioecological monitoring. She is the founder and coordinator of the International Network for Drylands Sustainability (RISZA), which is funded by Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología. Currently, she is jointly coordinating the network of Socioecological Participatory Observatories in Mexican drylands with RISZA’s Technical Academic Committee to foster community learning with local multistakeholder partnerships. After her graduate work, she served as a research assistant at the Technical University of Munich and held a postdoctoral position at the Institute of Ecology, University of Buenos Aires. Huber-Sannwald holds a Ph.D. in ecology from Utah State University.

Toby Warden is the director for both the Board on Environmental Change and Society and the Board on Human-Systems Integration at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She oversees a range of social science-related activities concerning the human dimensions of environmental change and optimizing organizational performance. She joined the National Academies in 2009 as a study director on climate change and weather-related activities with the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×

Climate. In 2011, she joined the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education as a study director, and later associate board director, working on projects related to worker safety, safety culture, and systems science. From 2014 to 2015, she served as director of Scientific Administration for the Department of Neurological Sciences and as assistant professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, spearheading strategic planning efforts to foster research collaboration across the university system. Warden has a Ph.D. in social ecology with an emphasis on environmental analysis and design from the University of California, Irvine, and a certificate in business fundamentals from HBX/Harvard Business School.

Jordyn White (Study Director) is a program officer in the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Division on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. She recently directed a groundbreaking study that assessed the current state of data on the well-being of LGBTQI+ populations. Her previous projects include a study on the National Assessment of Educational Progress and workshops on estimating human trafficking in the United States and on principles and practices of federal program evaluation. Previously, at the U.S. Census Bureau, she worked on methodology, implementation, and nonresponse follow-up design for the American Community Survey and the 2020 Census. She is a member of the Advisory Committee to the Office of LGBTQ Affairs in the Office of the Mayor of the District of Columbia. White has a B.S. in psychology from the University of Pittsburgh and an M.S. in criminal justice from St. Joseph’s University.

Adam K. Jones is a research associate in the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Division on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. He served as a senior program assistant for both the Board on Environmental Change and Society and the Board on Human-Systems Integration supporting the consensus study on Sustainability Partnerships in the U.S.–Mexico Drylands Region and the Committee on Cybersecurity Workforce of the Federal Aviation Administration. Before joining the National Academies, he served on the board of the Graduate English Organization at the University of Maryland (UMD), College Park, as the technology chair from 2018 to 2019. Jones holds an M.A. in English language and literature with a certificate in critical theory from UMD, College Park, where his scholarship focused on 20th century and contemporary literature depicting climate change and envrionmental ruin; and he received his B.A. in English literature from the University of Utah.

Tina M. Latimer is the program coordinator for the Board on Environmental Change and Society and the Board on Human-Systems Integration. She

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×

joined the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in 2014 after 19 years of experience working in law firms as an office manager and executive legal secretary. She also worked as a staff assistant to the U.S. Congressional Subcommittee on Commerce, Consumer Protection and Competitiveness. Through these experiences, she developed excellent skills in managing the overall administrative and logistical procedures in a busy environment. She is responsible for coordinating the reporting requirements, administrative functions, and logistical support for both boards, the director, and the project committees. Latimer holds a B.S. in criminology and criminal justice (with a minor in women’s studies) from the University of Maryland.

Heather Kreidler is the owner of Fact or Fiction, LLC, a consulting business dedicated to fact-checking services and research support. From 2008 to 2019 she worked at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine with the Board on Environmental Change and Society, Board on Human-Systems Integration, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, and Food and Nutrition Board. Ms. Kreidler received a B.S. in business management from Kutztown University and an M.S. in environmental science and policy from George Mason University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×
Page90
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26070.
×
Page92
Next: Appendix D: Characteristics of the Binational Region »
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The border region shared by the United States and Mexico is currently experiencing multiple crises on both sides that present challenges to safeguarding the region's sustainable natural resources and to ensuring the livelihoods of its residents. These challenges are exacerbated by stressors including global climate change, increasing urbanization and industrialization and attendant air and water-quality degradation, and rapid population growth. Navigating these challenges and preserving the area’s cultural richness, economy, and ecology will require building strategic partnerships that engage a broad range of stakeholders from both countries.

To navigate these challenges, the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, together with the Mexican Academy of Sciences (Academia Mexicana de Ciencias), Mexican Academy of Engineering (Academia de Ingeniería de México), and Mexican National Academy of Medicine (Academia Nacional de Medicina de México), appointed a committee of experts from the United States and Mexico to conduct a consensus study.

Advancing United States-Mexico Binational Sustainability Partnerships incorporates features of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, in particular, Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 17. SDG 17 calls for revitalizing global partnerships for sustainable development. It is specifically focused on the advancement of multi-stakeholder partnerships that require coordination and collaboration among diverse stakeholders in pursuit of a common and mutually beneficial vision. With attention to SDG 17, this report draws on social science theory and applied research on partnerships to explore potential strategies and mechanisms to increase coordination between relevant government agencies, the private sector, and civil society in the United States and Mexico.

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