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Each year, national crash studies have estimated that while overall traffic fatalities are decreasing, the percentages of those fatalities among pedestrians and cyclists are increasing.

NCHRP Research Report 1064: Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Performance Functions, from TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program, presents state departments of transportation and other transportation professionals with an update of pedestrian and bicycle safety performance functions (SPFs).

Supplemental to the report are three spreadsheet tools that address SPFs on rural multilane roads, rural two-lane roads, and urban/suburban arterials.

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