National Academies Press: OpenBook

Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition (2019)

Chapter:Chapter 1 - Introduction

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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14275.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14275.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14275.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14275.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14275.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14275.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14275.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14275.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14275.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14275.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/14275.
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Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

1 ACRP Report 16: Guidebook for Managing Small Airports, published in 2009, has been one of the most frequently accessed and used ACRP documents. Since it was published, the aviation industry has continued to evolve; regulations have changed and additional ACRP documents providing resources for managers of small airports have been published. Two of the most notable changes in the aviation industry are the continued implementation of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) modernization of the National Airspace System (NAS) and the exponential increase in the operation of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). To continue to provide a useful and relevant resource for small airport managers, ACRP Project 01-32, “Update Report 16: Guidebook for Managing Small Airports,” was initiated. This update, known as ACRP Research Report 16: Guidebook for Managing Small Airports, Second Edition (ACRP Report 16, 2nd edition), provides new and updated material to keep the guidance relevant. It also transforms the original report into a concise, user-friendly, self-help guidebook augmented by ACRP WebResource 6: Resources for Managing Small Airports that connects the guidebook to available electronic resource documents and tools. Key Insights The airport manager is responsible for providing on behalf of the airport owner a safe, secure and regulatory-compliant facility that delivers aviation services, through managing resources and controlling risk while concurrently serving as a developer and community liaison. This guidebook is intended to provide information to assist an airport manager in the wide range of responsibilities associated with the management of small airports. Industry outreach to small airport managers around the country was conducted to seek their input to make this an appropriate resource. This guidebook does not seek to recreate all the small airport management resources available, but rather to serve as a compass to direct small airport managers to the resources pertinent to their needs in managing the risks and multiplicity of needs associated with operating an airport. Key Definitions Airport Improvement Program (AIP): A program that provides financial grants to primarily public agencies for the planning and development of public-use airports that are included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems. C H A P T E R 1 Introduction

2 Guidebook for Managing Small Airports Airport director or airport manager: The person responsible for the day-to-day operation of an airport, including the business, administration, operational and communication aspects and the implementation of policy guidance and longer-term plans for the airport. Airport sponsor: Typically a public agency or tax-supported organization that is authorized to own and operate an airport, obtain funds and property interests and be legally, financially and otherwise able to meet all applicable requirements of laws and regulations. Occasionally, it is a private entity. Commercial service airport: An airport with scheduled passenger service and at least 2,500 passengers boarding per year. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA): The United States Department of Transportation’s agency for aviation. In addition to regulating airports, aircraft manufacturing and parts cer- tification, aircraft operation and pilot certification (“licensing”), the FAA operates air traffic control, purchases and maintains navigation equipment, certifies airports and aids airport development, among other activities. Federally obligated airport: An airport that has accepted federal grant funds and the associated requirements known as grant assurances. General aviation (GA): All civil aviation (excluding military) except those classified as air carrier or air taxi. The types of aircraft typically used in GA activities vary from multiengine jet aircraft to single-engine piston aircraft for purposes such as personal, business and instruc- tional flying. General aviation airport: Airport not classified as commercial service or military. National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (NPIAS): Public-use airports considered necessary to provide a safe, efficient and integrated system of airports to meet the needs of the United States civil aviation, national defense and the U.S. Postal Service. Nonhub commercial service airport: Airport with more than 2,500 annual passenger board- ings (enplanements) but less than 0.05 percent of the national passenger boardings. Nonprimary commercial service airports: Airports with scheduled passenger service and annual passenger boardings (enplanements) between 2,500 and 10,000. Nonprimary airport: An NPIAS airport with 10,000 or fewer annual passenger boardings (enplanements). Policymakers: Individuals who have the authority to set the policy framework of (or deter- mine the policies for) an organization. In the case of small airports, policymakers include the members of the airport’s governing body or airport sponsor. Some examples of policymakers include city council members, county commissioners and airport board members. Small airport (as defined for this guidebook): General aviation, nonhub commercial service and airports with limited and/or volunteer staff. 1.1 Approach to Project ACRP Report 16, 2nd edition builds on the first edition by using the data in the original report as background information. This data was then reformatted, edited and expanded for currency and relevance. To serve as a self-help guide for small airport managers, drawing from the results of a small airport industry survey, this second edition drills down further to provide the “how to” application guidance within the changing aviation environment. Most airport

Introduction 3 managers can identify the issues or challenges facing their airports but may not be sure where to look or have the time to dig for answers. ACRP Report 16, 2nd edition is intended to serve as a go-to resource to fill in those management practice gaps with best practices and tools that small airport managers can use to address their issues. The best practices and tools in, or associated with, this guidebook include items such as sample documents, decision flowcharts and other graphics to provide guidance and resources. Airports with small or limited staff frequently contract for outside assistance with engineers, consultants and other specialty services. This guidebook includes information on small airport management functions that may use outside services to provide the small airport manager with background information to assist in contracting for and managing the services. Organization of the Guidebook Two introductory chapters are included in the guidebook to set the stage for the management function chapters, as shown in Table 1. Chapter 1: Introduction describes the organization and guidebook use strategies. Chapter 2: Airport Roles—Key Classifications and Regulations in the Airport System describes the airport’s roles within the aviation system, its relationship to grant funding and federal requirements and its benefits to your community. Chapters 3 through 6 cover the following four overarching management function areas: • Business: financial and administration management • Operations: running a safe, secure and efficient airport • Asset Management: maintaining the current assets and planning development for the future • Communications: promoting the airport and connecting with the community Because, within the guidebook’s definition of small airports, some small airports that support commercial service operations are included, stand-alone Chapter 7: Commercial Service— Attracting Airlines and Transitioning to Airline Service is dedicated to small airports and their related commercial service topics. Chapters Contents Introductory Chapters Chapter 1: Introduction Purpose of and usage tips for the guidebook and web resource Chapter 2: Airport Roles—Key Classifications and Regulations in the Airport System Identify your airport’s role, funding opportunities and design standards Management Function Chapters Chapter 3: Business—Financial and Administrative Management Financial and administrative management functions Chapter 4: Operations—Running a Safe, Secure and Efficient Airport Daily to specialty operating functions Chapter 5: Asset Management— Maintaining Current Assets and Planning Development for the Future Preserving and protecting existing assets and planning for future development Chapter 6: Communication—Promoting the Airport and Connecting with the Community Ongoing, promotional and emergency communication strategies Commercial Service Chapter Chapter 7: Commercial Service— Attracting Airlines and Transitioning to Airline Service Nonhub scheduled passenger service information for small airports with or considering commercial service Additional Resources Aviation-Related Abbreviations, Glossary, and Bibliography Additional reference material Table 1. Organization of the guidebook.

4 Guidebook for Managing Small Airports Within the chapters, there are separate sections dedicated to specific small airport management topics. To allow these sections to be used as stand-alone references, each section opens with key insights and definitions related to that topic. The key insights are related to that topic and are designed to summarize the significant takeaway material. The definitions are for key terms used within that section. In addition, the key definitions throughout the guidebook, along with related small airport management terms, are also summarized in the glossary, because survey participants, especially those less familiar with aviation, indicated they used the glossary as an educational tool. Because many small airport management topics are interconnected, the electronic version of the guidebook contains links between related topics. While the links appear the same in the electronic copy of the guidebook, there are two types. One type of link is to related sections in the document. The other type of link is to external resources. The goal of the links is to allow the user to access the topic of interest and then readily move to related matter as needed. Icons To further assist in using ACRP Report 16, 2nd edition as a ready reference guide, icons are used throughout the document to highlight applicability or important information (see Figure 1). ACRP WebResource 6: Resources for Managing Small Airports This guidebook has been prepared to provide you, the small airport manager, with a basic understanding of and best practices guidance on a broad range of subjects related to small airport management, with the goal of providing ideas for new methods or approaches you may not already be using. The electronic guidebook is enhanced with direct links to online resources, which are also compiled in ACRP WebResource 6, to enable you to dig deeper into selected topics. ACRP WebResource 6 contains annotated links to existing ACRP, FAA, state, industry and other relevant resources. It also contains editable tools and templates to support the guidance contained in ACRP Report 16, 2nd edition so you can take the information and quickly put it into practice. These editable documents are indicated by a pencil icon in the guidebook. When using the electronic guidebook, you can typically access the search function through a magnifying glass or Crtl+F to search for keywords in the document. Caution: Use caution with this activity Savings: Opportunity for savings or increased value Definition: Important terms defined Scalable: Guidance can be adapted to varying sizes of airports Commercial service: Applicable to airports with commercial service FAR Part 139: Applicable to FAR Part 139 airports only Key: Important point for consideration Hint: Practical suggestion or useful approach Regulatory: Regulations-driven requirement Figure 1. Icons used in ACRP Report 16, 2nd edition. Editable template: Document in ACRP WebResource 6 that can be customized

Introduction 5 The resources within ACRP WebResource 6 are organized by guidebook chapter and, thus, topic. In addition to a hyperlink to the resources, the resource title and a short summary of each are provided. These summaries contain keywords for the web resource search function. In the event a link to a resource becomes broken, the title and summary information should enable you to conduct a search for the document outside the web resource. ACRP Report 16, 2nd edition will be most effective when used in the electronic format. When used electronically, links between the guidebook and online resources will enable you to click on the identified resource in the guidebook and go to the resource document or website. In addi- tion, ACRP WebResource 6 is searchable and, because it is organized by chapter topic, can be used independently of the guidebook. 1.2 Intended Audience ACRP Report 16, 2nd edition is designed to serve managers of small airports. Small airport management is a very broad field, and small airport managers tend to have a variety of respon- sibilities, from finance to facility management to leasing to grass mowing or snow plowing. At many small airports, the airport manager tends to be responsible for multiple management functions. Small airport managers come from varying educational and aviation backgrounds. In addition, at many small airports, the staffing is limited, meaning the small airport manager is frequently seen as the lead for all management areas. Therefore, this guidebook is designed to assist the small airport manager by providing a self-help reference to aid in addressing the many facets of the position. In addition to being responsible for multiple management functions, the airport manager also plays a key role in the day-to-day functions of the airport and is the interface between the policymaking board and the users, stakeholders, industry groups and regulators. The manager generally operates under and carries out the desires of a policymaking board while serving as the face of the airport to the other parties and the community. The airport manager is the liaison between the airport owner, which is a governmental entity at a publicly owned airport, and the airport policymaking board. The policymaking board may be a board established for the sole purpose of airport oversight, or it may be part of a city department or division. While the policymaking board sets the policy, the airport manager is responsible for implementing the policy or the resulting rules and regulations established to implement the policy. ACRP Report 58: Airport Industry Familiarization and Training for Part-Time Airport Policy Makers provides a tool for the small airport manager to use to assist members of the policymaking board in understanding the airport, its role and funding sources. At a small airport, the airport manager interacts with four general audiences (as shown in Figure 2): airport users—those who conduct operations or an aviation business; key stakeholders—the customers, neighbors and community served by the airport; national advo- cacy groups; and regulators. While this guidebook can be used for any airport, the data included has been prepared to support public-use small airports. The size of small airports encompassed by the guidebook definition includes GA, reliever, commercial service and nonhub primary airports within the NPIAS). The general aviation definition includes basic, local, regional and national GA airports, as defined in the FAA’s General Aviation Airports: A National Asset. In addition, there are numerous small airports within state aviation systems that are not part of the NPIAS to which this guidebook should be useful. More details on the types of small airports and their role in the aviation system are included in Chapter 2. For this guidebook, small airport is defined as general aviation, nonhub commercial service and airports with limited and/or volunteer staff.

6 Guidebook for Managing Small Airports 1.3 Industry Survey In the effort to update the first edition of ACRP Report 16 to create a concise document focused on the most common needs of small airport managers, the first step was industry outreach. The desired outcome from the outreach was to identify key information needs and the gaps that needed to be filled by the updated guidebook. The findings from this outreach were used to guide the resource review. While there are common challenges among small airports, each airport is unique, as is its geographic location. The goal of the industry outreach was to identify common gaps in small airport management practices for which guidance is desired, and any unique geographical needs. Secondly, data on the demographic profile of small airport managers was gathered to align the updated guidebook with the most common levels of professional, educational and experience backgrounds of small airport managers. The candidate airports were identified through coordination with state aviation agencies. The research team sought the help of these agencies to identify potential survey candidates, because in many cases, these agencies have the most frequent contact with small airports. Each agency was asked to recommend 5 to 10 airport managers representing the diversity of small airports within its state. The industry survey was distributed electronically and con- sisted of 35 multiple-choice, ranking and open-ended questions, allowing the responders to provide as much detail or insight as desired. The key results of the survey are shown in Figure 3. Source: ACRP Report 58: Airport Industry Familiarization and Training for Part-Time Airport Policy Makers, 2011 Po licy making BoardA irp ort Ma nagement and Staff Users • Tenants • Fixed Base Operators • Pilots • Passengers • Hangar Owners • Aircraft Owners • Concessionaires • Airlines Key Stakeholders • Airport Customers • Passengers • Community • Neighbors • General Public Advocacy Industry Groups • National Association of State Aviation Officials • Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association • National Business Aviation Association • Experimental Aircraft Association • American Association of Airport Executives • Airports Council International Regulators/Government Partners • Federal Aviation Administration • State Aviation Agency • Local Agencies • Transportation Security Administration Airport Owner Figure 2. Airport manager relationships.

Introduction 7 The small airport manager industry outreach survey was sent to 322 airport managers representing 331 facilities within the broad range of small airports. During the 30-day survey period, 114 small airport managers responded to the survey for a 35 percent response rate. The respondent sample group exhibited the general demographic and geographical characteristics of the original survey group. A summary of the survey results is included in ACRP WebResource 6. 1.4 Common Resources This guidebook is intended to serve as a compass to guide the user to relevant resources available as of its publication. The following summarizes the most common resources beneficial to small airport managers, many of which are incorporated as refer- ences throughout this guidebook and are part of ACRP WebResource 6. This list is not intended to be exhaustive but to identify many of the most frequently used resources. Federal Aviation Regulations Public-use airports, especially those accepting grant funding from the FAA, are sub- ject to a number of federal regulations. The aviation regulations are found in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), commonly referred to as Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR). These regulations regulate aircraft, airmen, airports and the NAS. Many of these regulations apply to small airports, and as with any legislation, they may change. The most commonly referenced regulations for small airports include the following: • FAR Part 77: Objects Affecting Navigable Airspace. Part 77 establishes standards for determining obstructions in navigable airspace, outlines the requirements for notifying the FAA of certain proposed construction or alteration and provides for aeronautical studies of obstructions to air navigation in order to determine their effect on the safe and efficient use of airspace. Section 77.25 of this part establishes imaginary surfaces around airport runways, approach zones and navigable airspace in the vicinity of the airport. • FAR Part 107: Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems. Part 107 establishes the regis- tration of airmen and the certification and operation of small (weighing less than 55 pounds) UASs within the United States. Subpart B: Operating Rules is most relevant to airport managers. • FAR Part 137: Agricultural Aircraft Operations. Part 137 prescribes the rules gov- erning agricultural aircraft operations within the United States and the issuance of commercial and private agricultural aircraft operator certificates for those operations. • FAR Part 139: Certification of Airports. Part 139 prescribes rules governing the certifica- tion of airports accommodating scheduled passenger service with aircraft seating more than 9 passengers or unscheduled service with aircraft seating at least 31 passengers, with some specific exceptions for airports in Alaska. • FAR Part 150: Airport Noise Compatibility Planning. Part 150 applies to the airport noise- compatibility planning activities of public-use airports, including heliports. It outlines the procedures for developing and submitting airport noise-compatibility programs. • FAR Part 151: Federal Aid to Airports. Part 151 provides detailed information regarding FAA airport construction and development grants. It also specifies that all airport develop- ment under the federal-aid airport program must be done in accordance with an approved airport layout plan. Each airport layout plan and any changes to the layout are subject to FAA approval. Figure 3. Key findings of the industry survey performed for ACRP 01-32 (November 2017).

8 Guidebook for Managing Small Airports • FAR Part 152: Airport Aid Program. Part 152 applies to airport planning and development under the Airport and Airway Development Act of 1970, as amended. It outlines eligibility requirements and application procedures; funding, accounting and reporting requirements; nondiscrimination in airport aid programs; suspension and termination of grants; and energy conservation programs. • FAR Part 156: State Block Grant Pilot Program. Part 156 establishes the procedure by which a state may apply to participate in the state block grant pilot program, the program administra- tion requirements, the program responsibilities for participating states and the enforcement responsibilities of participating states. • FAR Part 157: Notice of Construction, Alteration, Activation and Deactivation of Airports. Part 157 defines the requirements for notifying the FAA when proposing to construct, alter, activate or deactivate a civil or joint-use (civil/military) airport or to alter the status of such an airport. • FAR Part 158: Passenger Facility Charges (PFCs). Part 158 applies to the passenger facility charges that may be approved by the FAA and imposed by a public agency that controls a commercial service airport. • FAR Part 170: Establishment and Discontinuance Criteria for Air Traffic Control Services and Navigational Facilities. Part 170 sets the federal criteria for the establishment of air traffic control services. While not directly applicable to small airports, the FARs below define aircraft operating rules. For example, FAR Part 91 includes the requirements for how aircraft operators calculate the needed runway length for landing. • FAR Part 91: General Operating and Flight Rules. Part 91 prescribes the rules governing the operation of aircraft within the United States, including the waters within 3 nautical miles of the United States coast. It also establishes the requirements for operators to take actions to support the continued airworthiness of each aircraft. • FAR Part 121: Operating Requirements: Domestic, Flag and Supplemental Operations. Part 121 establishes the requirements for air carrier operators. FAA Advisory Circulars FAA advisory circulars are written guidance to the airport industry. However, when an airport accepts an AIP grant and its assurances, advisory circulars become essentially regulatory because they describe how to meet the condition of a “manner approved by the administrator.” The 150 series is focused on airports and addresses: • Aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF) • Airport compliance/obligations • Airport design, construction and maintenance • Airports geographic information systems (Airports GIS) • Airport Improvement Program • Airport lighting • Airport pavement design • Airport planning • Airport safety • Certification of Airports (Part 139) Some of the most commonly referenced advisory circulars are: • 150/5100-14: Architectural, Engineering and Planning Consultant Services for Airport Grant Projects • 150/5340-1: Standards for Airport Markings

Introduction 9 • 150/5340-30: Design and Installation Details for Airport Visual Aids • 150/5300-13: Airport Design • 150/5370-10: Standards for Specifying Construction of Airports FAA updates to an advisory circular can occur through either a change to or a reissuing of the advisory circular. A change is limited to specific pages and identifies the page(s) that is(are) changed. A reissuance indicates a larger overall modification to the guidance. When an advisory circular is referenced, there will be an indication of any changes after the circular’s number. When an advisory circular is reissued, an alphabetical letter is added or changed at the end of the circular’s number. For example, Advisory Circular 150/5300-13A, Change 1, indicates that there has been one reissuance of the advisory circular and one change since its issuance that affected specific pages. Throughout this guidebook, the FAA advisory circulars and orders have been referenced by number, only omitting any update letters. The most recent edition of the advisory circular or order, with any changes, should always be referenced. The most recent editions are available on the FAA’s website. FAA Orders FAA orders are written guidance to FAA staff to implement the FAA programs. The orders are also useful to airports to identify the requirements FAA staff must meet in working with your airport. The following are some of the most commonly used FAA orders for airports: • Order 1050.1: Environmental Impacts: Policies and Procedures • Order 5100.38: Airport Improvement Program Handbook • Order 5190.6: FAA Airport Compliance Manual • Order 5050.4: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Instructions for Airport Actions Other Resources Other FAA Resources The FAA also issues guidance in the form of program guidance letters, engineering briefs and Part 139 CertAlerts to augment information in the advisory circulars. All FAA resources are available on its website, www.faa.gov. In addition, the FAA’s website serves as a portal to submit requests to the FAA, such as to initiate an airspace study. ACRP Resources Sponsored by the FAA and administered through the Transportation Research Board, part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, ACRP is an industry-driven, applied research program to develop near-term, practical solutions to problems faced by airport operators. ACRP was established as part of the Vision 100 – Century of Aviation Reauthorization Act of 2003. According to the ACRP 2017 Annual Report of Progress, from 2005 to 2017, ACRP funded 555 projects, and the research continues, with more resource documents being pub- lished as projects are completed. The most commonly referenced ACRP products for airport management practices are: • ACRP Research Reports, which are developed from research projects and may be accompanied by associated tools developed during the project. • ACRP Syntheses of Airport Practice, which are reports that synthesize current knowledge and practice, without the detailed direction usually found in handbooks or design manuals.

10 Guidebook for Managing Small Airports • ACRP Legal Research Digests, which report on legal topics of special interest to the airport legal community. • ACRP WebResources, which are websites that may include topical libraries, training videos, and other resources related to a research project. Some of the ACRP research projects also result in Web-Only Documents or have provided CDs with interactive tools. ACRP WebResource 6 is a companion to this report and provides an electronic library of resources for managers of small airports. State Aeronautics Agency Publications A state aeronautics or aviation agency is generally part of a state’s department of transporta- tion. State aeronautics agencies may be the most direct link to a small airport and are a great resource for small airports to use to identify state-specific airport requirements or processes. States and local units of government may have their own rules and regulations applicable to airports. These may cover stormwater runoff and wetland protection, zoning, labor requirements and wage rates, working hours, product use, noise ordinances and other issues. Some states require airports, other than FAR Part 139-certificated airports, to have a license to operate and meet certain safety and security standards to obtain the operating license or permit. State aviation agencies typically work with local airports to educate them about state rules and regulations. State airport conferences can also be a valuable tool for learning about current requirements and for communicating with other airport managers about recommendations for meeting those standards. Because each state has different requirements, this guidebook focuses only on national requirements or issues. Contacting the state aeronautics agency is a good first step for a small airport to become acquainted with state-specific requirements and resources. Most of the state aviation agencies provide some resources on their websites, ranging from state aviation system plans to templates for best practices and guidance documents. While each state aeronautics website focuses first on information on and for airports in their state, many also provide information that can be useful to airport managers in other states. Larger states and those with more airports tend to have more resources available, which when used appropriately can have applicability even outside the state. Some examples of state resources include the following: • Florida Department of Transportation, Aviation and Spaceports Office has numerous resource documents available on its website. • Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), Aviation Division provides model documents on its TxDOT Airport Rules and Standards web page to assist airport managers. • Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, Bureau of Aviation has a number of resources available for airport managers on its website and published an Airport Manager’s Safety Handbook that contains similar information to the guidebook in an abbreviated format. • Georgia Department of Transportation, Aviation has a Sample Forms Tab on its website with sample documents to assist airport managers. Some of this reference information is linked to other resources. • Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Bureau of Aeronautics also provides numerous templates and the sample documents on its Airport Operations page. A relationship with the state aeronautics agency is even more critical in 10 states that are part of the FAA’s State Block Grant Program. Under the program, the state is responsible for programming the monies allocated for the AIP for nonprimary airports. As of 2017, the states participating in the FAA’s State Block Grant Program are Georgia, Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas and Wisconsin. Using the National Organization of State Aviation Officials members’ web page is a quick way to identify the primary contact in a state aeronautics agency and agency’s website.

Introduction 11 Resource Networks The industry survey responses received by the research team stressed the importance of building a resource network. This resource network can be composed of other small airport managers, state and federal aviation agency personnel and other people associated with the aviation industry. Because many small airports have very limited staff, this network can serve as a resource on current issues and as a sounding board for best practices for the small airport manager. Resource networks are generally built through involvement in the aviation industry, such as with state aviation associations and getting to know your state aeronautics agency and FAA Airports district office (ADO) program manager. In addition to serving as a resource, the state aeronautics agency and FAA personnel that understand your airport and its needs can also serve as champions for your airport in the grant funding programming process. Resource networks may also be available for specific interests within aviation such as the Recreational Aviation Foundation, which focuses on airstrips that provide access to recreational areas. Internet Search ACRP guidebooks, and even web resources, by their very nature are static. ACRP Report 16, 2nd edition and ACRP WebResource 6 represent the collective knowledge at the point in time they were completed. The dynamic aviation industry will continue to change and evolve. Therefore, to augment the information in the guidebook and web resource, additional information can be sought via an internet search. Whenever using the internet, appropriate caution should be used to ensure the documents are current and that the guidance is authentic. The landing pages in ACRP WebResource 6 are designed to assist you in searching for future updated editions of referenced documents. Summary ACRP Research Report 16, 2nd edition and ACRP WebResource 6 are designed to work in concert to provide you, the small airport manager, with self-help guidance and tools to address the multiple requirements of managing small airports. You can download the guidebook from the TRB website (www.trb.org) and use the hyperlinks to access the additional resources and tools in ACRP WebResource 6. Consult ACRP Report 16, 2nd edition and ACRP WebResource 6 when encountering new issues or for additional ideas to aid in addressing existing challenges. Internet searches can be beneficial—just stay aware of the source of the document and its date, so you are using current, reputable information.

Next: Chapter 2 - Airport Roles Key Classifications and Regulations in the Airport System »
Guidebook for Managing Small Airports - Second Edition Get This Book
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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 16: Guidebook for Managing Small Airports. Second Edition is designed to help airport practitioners, owners, operators, managers, and policymakers of small airports, who may have varying degrees of experience and backgrounds, to fulfill their responsibilities in such areas as financial management, oversight of contracts and leases, safety and security, noise impacts, community relations, compliance with federal and state obligations, facility maintenance, and capital improvements.

The first edition has been edited and reformatted for currency, relevance, and usability and updated with additional information and new subject areas (e.g., unmanned aircraft systems, geographic information systems, digital Notices to Airmen, social media, and federal and state obligations).

Since the publication of ACRP Report 16: Guidebook for Managing Small Airports (2009), a significant amount of research that could be of direct benefit to small airports has been completed, and the Federal Aviation Administration, state agencies, and trade and industry groups have developed and initiated new policies and guidance. In addition, small airports are facing new industry challenges not addressed in the first edition (e.g., unmanned aerial systems). Therefore, an update was needed.

ACRP WebResource 6: Resources for Managing Small Airports is a companion to ACRP Research Report 16: Guidebook for Managing Small Airports, 2nd edition. The web resource serves as an electronic library delivering additional resources and tools to allow small airport managers to dig deeper into topics of interest frequently encountered in their airport manager roles. It also contains implementation resources and tools associated with recommendations in the guidebook.

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