National Academies Press: OpenBook

Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports (2016)

Chapter: Chapter Two - Study Methodology

« Previous: Chapter One - Introduction
Page 5
Suggested Citation:"Chapter Two - Study Methodology ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
×
Page 5
Page 6
Suggested Citation:"Chapter Two - Study Methodology ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
×
Page 6
Page 7
Suggested Citation:"Chapter Two - Study Methodology ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
×
Page 7

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

5 chapter two STUDY METHODOLOGY Before data from airports on the topic of airport advisories was gathered for this synthesis, the literature on this topic was reviewed. Specifically, a search was conducted on the topic of airport advisories through Google, Google Scholar, TRID database [records from TRB’s Transportation Research Information Services Database and the Joint Transport Research Centre’s International Transport Research Documentation Database of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)], FAA website, and OneSearch (powered by EBSCO). Next, the population for this synthesis was clearly defined. Because of the focus on airport advi- sories, only non-towered airports were included. In addition, a minimum number of annual aircraft operations of 50,000 was established. The Airport Master Record database (GCR n.d.) was used to define the specific study population of airports, which numbered 204 (see Appendix A). As of May 2015, there were 204 airports in the United States that met the criteria (non-towered with at least 50,000 annual aircraft operations); they represent each of the nine FAA regions and 38 states (see Table 1 and Figure 1). To gather the intended data, a telephone interview script was developed (see Appendix B). To ensure a higher response rate and rich data collection, the telephone interview was chosen rather than a more typical online or mailed survey. It was thought that speaking with participants in an open-ended fashion likely would enable greater insight than would the use of an instrument with close-ended questions. The interview script was intended to gain insight into current practices at these non-towered airports regarding airport advisories. The script was developed with insight from the project panel. The airport manager of each airport selected for the study was contacted by telephone during June, July, or August 2015. The interview script was used to guide each phone call. If the airport manager answering the call indicated that the FBO, flight school, or other organization was responsible for issuing airport advisories, that entity was contacted. A total of 165 responses were obtained, resulting in an 81% response rate. In addition to the initial telephone interviews, the study included a second phase in which a few willing and interested participants were contacted a second time, and a case example interview script was used (Appendix C). These airports were selected in a purposeful way. They represent a geographically diverse set of airports of various sizes (based on operations) and those with stand- alone UNICOM or combined CTAF/UNICOM frequency. The goal during this second phase was to gain more insight into successful airport advisory practices at some of the participating airports and determine lessons learned and most effective practices used.

6 Nevada 4 Western-Pacific Nebraska 1 Central State Number of Airports (Non-towered and at Least 50,000 Annual Operations) FAA Region Alaska 3 Alaskan Alabama 9 Southern Arkansas 5 Southwest Arizona 7 Western-Pacific California 25 Western-Pacific Colorado 6 Northwest Mountain Florida 18 Southern Georgia 3 Southern Idaho 3 Northwest Mountain Illinois 6 Great Lakes Indiana 1 Great Lakes Kansas 1 Central Kentucky 1 Southern Louisiana 8 Southwest Massachusetts 3 New England Maryland 1 Eastern Maine 1 New England Minnesota 4 Great Lakes Missouri 2 Central Mississippi 1 Southern North Carolina 9 Southern New Jersey 4 Eastern New Mexico 1 Southwest New York 6 Eastern Ohio 14 Great Lakes Oklahoma 4 Southwest Oregon 5 Northwest Mountain Pennsylvania 3 Eastern South Carolina 4 Southern Tennessee 5 Southern Texas 11 Southwest Utah 4 Northwest Mountain Virginia 4 Eastern Washington 12 Northwest Mountain Wisconsin 4 Great Lakes Wyoming 1 Northwest Mountain Total 204 TABLE 1 AIRPORTS TO BE SURVEYED BY STATE AND FAA REGION

7 FIGURE 1 Surveyed airports by FAA region.

Next: Chapter Three - Literature Review »
Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports Get This Book
×
 Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports
Buy Paperback | $51.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 75: Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports documents the manner in which non-towered airports provide advisories to pilots regarding winds, traffic, and runways in use. Unlike with pilot advisories, there is little guidance available for airport operators in providing airport advisories. The objective of this report is to aggregate available guidance on this topic and document information from non-towered airports with at least 50,000 annual aircraft operations. The report includes a literature review and a telephone interview survey of 165 non-towered airports. Six case examples are included, documenting effective airport advisory programs in place at airports.

READ FREE ONLINE

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!