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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26804.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Panel Members

SHARON LOHR (chair) is a professor emerita at Arizona State University, where she was Dean’s Distinguished Professor of Statistics until 2012. Between 2012 and 2017, as a vice president at Westat, she developed survey designs and statistical analysis methods for use in transportation, public health, crime measurement, and education. Lohr’s research interests include sample surveys, design of experiments, hierarchical models, and combining multiple sources of data. She is the author of numerous research articles as well as the books Sampling: Design and Analysis and Measuring Crime: Behind the Statistics. Lohr is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and the inaugural recipient of the Gertrude M. Cox Statistics Award for contributions to the practice of statistics. Her invited presentations include selection as the Morris Hansen Lecturer and the Deming Lecturer. Lohr has served on two previous National Academies committees: The Panel on Improving Federal Statistics for Policy and Social Science Research Using Multiple Data Sources and State-of-the-Art Estimation Methods and the Panel on the Functionality and Usability of Data from the American Community Survey. She earned her B.S. degree in mathematics from Calvin College, and her Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

JEAN-FRANÇOIS BEAUMONT is a senior statistical advisor at Statistics Canada. Over his career, he has conducted development and research projects on topics such as statistical data integration, small area estimation, treatment of missing values in surveys, bootstrap variance estimation,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26804.
×

and other estimation issues for sample surveys. Beaumont is currently the editor of Survey Methodology, an associate editor for Metron, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and was the president of the Survey Methods Section of the Statistical Society of Canada. He has delivered many invited presentations and courses, including the opening address of the Colloque Francophone sur les Sondages, and was a Morris Hansen Lecturer. He obtained a B.S. degree in actuarial science and an M.S. in statistics from Laval University.

LAWRENCE D. BOBO is dean of social science, the W. E. B. Du Bois professor of the social sciences and holds the title of Harvard College professor at Harvard University. He has previously served as chair of the Department of African and African American Studies and currently holds appointments in the Department of Sociology as well as the Department of African and African American Studies. His research focuses on the intersection of social psychology, social inequality, politics, and race. Bobo is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Philosophical Society and a member of the board of directors and board vice-chair of the American Institutes for Research. He is a Guggenheim fellow, an Alphonse M. Fletcher Sr. fellow, a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is a Russell Sage Foundation visiting scholar. Bobo was elected the W. E. B. Du Bois fellow of the American Academy for Political and Social Science. He has held tenured appointments in the sociology departments at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, the University of California, Los Angeles, and at Stanford University where he was the Martin Luther King Jr. Centennial professor, chair of the Program in African American Studies and Director of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. He is currently working on the Race, Crime, and Public Opinion project as well as book on racial division and American politics. Bobo has an M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan.

MICK P. COUPER is a research professor at the Survey Research Center in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. His current research interests include survey nonresponse, design and implementation of survey data collection, effects of technology on the survey process, and computer-assisted interviewing, including both interviewer-administered (CATI and CAPI) and self-administered (web, audio-CASI, IVR) surveys. Many of Couper’s current projects focus on the design of web, smartphone, and mixed-mode surveys. He has served on National Academies studies including the Panel on Redesigning the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Expenditures Surveys, the Panel on the Research on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26804.
×

Future Census Methods, and the Oversight Committee for the Workshop on Survey Automation. Couper has an M.Soc.Sc. in sociology from the University of Cape Town, South Africa, an M.A. in applied social research from the University of Michigan, and Ph.D. in sociology from Rhodes University in South Africa.

HILARY HOYNES is professor of public policy and economics and holds the Haas distinguished chair in economic disparities at the University of California, Berkeley, where she also co-directs the Berkeley Opportunity Lab. She is an economist who works on poverty, inequality, food and nutrition programs, and the impacts of government tax and transfer programs on low-income families. Hoynes’ current work examines how access to the social safety net in early life affects children’s later life health and human capital outcomes. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the Society of Labor Economists. Hoynes has served as co-editor of the American Economic Review and the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy and is on the editorial board of the American Economic Review: Insights. She served on the National Academies committee on Building an Agenda to Reduce the Number of Children in Poverty by Half in 10 Years and the Federal Commission on Evidence-Based Policy Making. Hoynes received her B.A. in economics and mathematics from Colby College, and her Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University.

KIMBERLYN LEARY began her career as a clinical psychologist working as a practitioner to improve access to diverse communities. Her early work on negotiated transactions in psychotherapy expanded to broader research on negotiation, conflict transformation, and change management. Leary is an associate professor of psychology at the Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital, an associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and she was a lecturer in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School where she continues to direct executive education program for the Bloomberg Center for Cities and the Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership Initiative. She served as an adviser to the Obama White House, where she worked with the White House Council on Women and Girls to develop the Advancing Equity initiative (which focused on improving life outcomes for women and girls of color). Leary later served on the Biden-Harris transition as a member of the Agency Review Team for the Office of National Drug Control Policy. She recently completed a detail to the U.S. Office of Management and Budget as a senior equity fellow and the Domestic Policy Council as a senior policy advisor through an Intergovernmental Personnel Act to help implement President Biden’s executive order on equity

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26804.
×

(Executive Order 13985). She is also a senior vice president at the Urban Institute, where she leads program development and research management initiatives across the Institute’s policy and research centers.

DAVID MANCUSO is director of the Research and Data Analysis Division of the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. He leads a team of approximately 100 researchers and IT professionals performing analytical work across the spectrum of publicly funded social and health services in Washington State. Mancuso’s division developed and continues to maintain the agency’s Integrated Client Databases—a powerful federated data environment linking Medicaid medical, behavioral health, and long-term care data with social service, criminal justice, housing, child welfare, education, employment, and vital statistics data. He has expertise in quasi-experimental program evaluation, performance measurement and the development of predictive modeling technologies to support intervention targeting and care management in Medicaid delivery systems. Mancuso co-developed the Predictive Risk Intelligence System, the predictive modeling tool supporting physical and behavioral health interventions for Medicaid and dual Medicare-Medicaid beneficiaries in Washington State. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University.

JUDITH A. SELTZER is research professor and professor emerita of sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Previously, she directed the California Center for Population Research at UCLA and was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she contributed to the development and implementation of the National Survey of Families and Households. She also was president of the Population Association of America, and she previously served on the Board of Overseers for the General Social Survey. Her research interests include kinship patterns, intergenerational obligations, relationships between nonresident fathers and children, and how legal institutions and other policies affect family change. She is especially interested in kinship institutions that are in flux, such as marriage and cohabitation in the contemporary United States or divorced and nonmarital families. She also explores ways to improve the quality of survey data on families, and in 2013 Seltzer and her colleagues added a module with family rosters to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to provide new data on U.S. family networks. She served on the CNSTAT Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations, the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, the Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments, and the Panel to Review the 2010 Census. She has a B.A. in sociology from Princeton University and both an M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26804.
×

ELIZABETH A. STUART is Bloomberg professor of American health in the department of mental health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, with joint appointments in the Department of Biostatistics and the Department of Health Policy and Management. She also serves as executive vice dean for Academic Affairs. Stuart has extensive experience in methods for estimating causal effects for program and policy evaluation, particularly as applied to mental health, public policy, and education. Her primary research interests include designs for estimating causal effects in nonexperimental settings (such as propensity scores), and methods to assess and enhance the generalizability of randomized trials to target populations. She has received research funding from the National Science Foundation, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, the Institute of Education Sciences, the W.T. Grant Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health and has served on advisory panels for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. She has received the mid-career award from the Health Policy Statistics Section of the American Statistical Association, the Gertrude Cox Award for applied statistics, Harvard University’s Myrto Lefkopoulou Award for Excellence in Biostatistics, the Rod Little Lectureship from the University of Michigan Department of Biostatistics, and Society for Epidemiologic Research Marshall Joffe Epidemiologic Methods award. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science as well as the American Statistical Association. Stuart received her Ph.D. in statistics in 2004 from Harvard University.

SHAOWEN WANG is professor and head of the department of geography and geographic information science and an affiliate professor of the department of computer science, department of urban and regional planning, and school of information sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). He also has served as founding director of the CyberGIS Center for Advanced Digital and Spatial Studies at UIUC. His research interests include geographic information science and systems, advanced cyberinfrastructure and CyberGIS, complex environmental and geospatial problems, computational and data sciences, geospatial science and technology, high-performance and distributed computing, and spatial analysis and modeling. He received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and was named a Helen Corley Petit Scholar, Centennial Scholar, and Richard and Margaret Romano Professorial Scholar by UIUC’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. He served as a member of the Committee on Models of the World for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and as a member of the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He received a B.S. in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26804.
×

computer engineering from Tianjin University, an M.S. in geography from Peking University, and a M.S. in computer science and a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Iowa.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26804.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26804.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26804.
×
Page 237
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26804.
×
Page 238
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26804.
×
Page 239
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26804.
×
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Much of the statistical information currently produced by federal statistical agencies - information about economic, social, and physical well-being that is essential for the functioning of modern society - comes from sample surveys. In recent years, there has been a proliferation of data from other sources, including data collected by government agencies while administering programs, satellite and sensor data, private-sector data such as electronic health records and credit card transaction data, and massive amounts of data available on the internet. How can these data sources be used to enhance the information currently collected on surveys, and to provide new frontiers for producing information and statistics to benefit American society?

Toward a 21st Century National Data Infrastructure: Enhancing Survey Programs by Using Multiple Data Sources, the second report in a series funded by the National Science Foundation, discusses how use of multiple data sources can improve the quality of national and subnational statistics while promoting data equity. This report explores implications of combining survey data with other data sources through examples relating to the areas of income, health, crime, and agriculture.

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