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Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States (1992)

Chapter:C GLOBAL RESOURCES FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE SURVEILLANCE

« Previous: B CATALOG OF EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASE AGENTS
Suggested Citation:"C GLOBAL RESOURCES FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE SURVEILLANCE." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
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C
Global Resources for Infectious Disease Surveillance

U.S. and U.S. Affiliated

U.S. Department of Defense

ARMY

  1. Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR)

  2. Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP)

  3. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID)

  4. U.S. Army Medical Research Units (USAMRU):

    • Brasilia, Brazil

    • Nairobi, Kenya

    • Seoul, Korea

    • Bangkok, Thailand

  1. Armed Forces Medical Intelligence Center (AFMIC)

  2. Armed Forces Epidemiology Board (AFEB)

  3. Global Epidemiology Working Group (GEWG)

NAVY

  1. Navy Medical Research and Development Command (NMRDC)

  2. Navy Medical Research Units (NAMRU):

    • Indonesia

    • Philippines

    • Egypt

    • Peru

Suggested Citation:"C GLOBAL RESOURCES FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE SURVEILLANCE." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
Public Health Service

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH)

  1. Fogarty International Center

  2. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

    • International Collaborations in AIDS Research (ICAR)

      Mexico (Harvard University)

      Senegal (Harvard University)

      Malawi (Johns Hopkins University)

      Uganda (Case Western Reserve University)

      Zaire (Tufts University)

      Brazil (Cornell University)

    • International Collaborations in Infectious Disease Research (ICIDR)

      Brazil (Salvador) (Cornell University)

      Brazil (Forteleza) (University of Virginia)

      Brazil (Belo Horizonte) (Vanderbilt University) Brazil

      (Osvaldo Cruz Institute) (Harvard University)

      Venezuela (Albert Einstein College)

      Sudan (Brigham Young University)

      Israel (Columbia University)

    • Tropical Medicine Research Centers (TMRC);

      Colombia;

      Brazil;

      Philippines

    • Intramural;

      Malaria Research and Training Center, Mali; Ain Shams

      University, Egypt (research on vectors of disease)

    • International Tropical Medicine Research Network (not yet operational)

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL (CDC)

  1. National Center for Infectious Diseases (NCID)

  2. National Center for Prevention Services (NCPS)

  3. Medical Entomology Unit, Guatemala

    Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS)

    • Egypt

    • Puerto Rico

    • Sierra Leone

  1. Field Epidemiology Training Projects (FETP)

Suggested Citation:"C GLOBAL RESOURCES FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE SURVEILLANCE." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
  • Thailand

  • Indonesia

  • Mexico

  • Taiwan

  • Saudi Arabia

International

World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland
  1. Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR)

  2. Special Programme for Control of Diarrheal Diseases

  3. International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR, B)

  4. WHO Collaborating Centres: the WHO sponsors collaborations between laboratories around the world on many research topics, including such infectious disease subspecialties as:

    • Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    • AIDS research (Project SIDA)

    • Arbovirus reference and research

    • Enteric phage typing

    • Epidemiology of leptospirosis

    • Epidemiology training

    • Evaluation and testing of new insecticides

    • Host and parasite studies on malaria

    • Klebsiella

    • Mycobacterium leprae

    • Mycotic diseases

    • Plague

    • Reference and research in enteroviruses

    • Reference and research in Escherichia

    • Reference and research in rabies

    • Reference and research in Shigella

    • Reference and research in syphilis serology

    • Reference and research on viral hepatitis

    • Research, training, and eradication of dracunculiasis

    • Rickettsial reference and research

    • Salmonella

    • Smallpox and other poxvirus infections

    • Staphylococcus phage typing

    • Surveillance, epidemiology, and control of influenza

Suggested Citation:"C GLOBAL RESOURCES FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE SURVEILLANCE." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
  • Trepanomatoses

  • Virus reference and research (respiratory virus diseases other than influenza)

  • Virus reference and research (special pathogens)

  1. Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)—network of surveillance labs:

  • Osvaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

  • Carlos Malbran Institute, Buenos Aires, Argentina

  • National Institute of Health, Bogota, Colombia

  • National Hygiene Institute ''Rafael Rangel", Caracas, Venezuela

  • Central American Nutrition Institute (INCAP), Guatemala, Guatemala

  • Caribbean Epidemiology Center (CAREC), Port of Spain, Trinidad

  • Evandro Chagas Institute, Belem, Brazil

  • National Health Institute, Santiago, Chile

  • National Institute for Diagnosis and Epidemiological Reference (INDRE), Mexico City, Mexico

Pasteur Institutes
  • Algiers, Algeria

  • Brabant, Belgium

  • Bangui, Central African Republic

  • Paris, France

  • Cayenne, French Guiana

  • Noumea, New Caledonia

  • Tehran, Iran

  • Antananarivo, Madagascar

  • Casablanca, Morocco

  • Tangier, Morocco

  • Dakar, Senegal

  • Novi Sad, Yugoslavia

Consultative Group on International Agriculture Research (CGIAR)

The International Clinical Epidemiology Network (INCLEN)

National Epidemiology Boards (NEB)

Community Epidemiology and Health Management Network (CEN)

Suggested Citation:"C GLOBAL RESOURCES FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE SURVEILLANCE." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
Page261
Suggested Citation:"C GLOBAL RESOURCES FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE SURVEILLANCE." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
Page262
Suggested Citation:"C GLOBAL RESOURCES FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE SURVEILLANCE." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
Page263
Suggested Citation:"C GLOBAL RESOURCES FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE SURVEILLANCE." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
Page264
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Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States Get This Book
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The emergence of HIV disease and AIDS, the reemergence of tuberculosis, and the increased opportunity for disease spread through international travel demonstrate the critical importance of global vigilance for infectious diseases.

This volume highlights risk factors for the emergence of microbial threats to health, warns against complacency in public health, and promotes early prevention as a cost-effective and crucial strategy for maintaining public health in the United States and worldwide.

The volume identifies infectious disease threats posed by bacteria and viruses, as well as protozoans, helminths, and fungi. Rich in information, it includes a historical perspective on infectious disease, with focuses on Lyme disease, peptic ulcer, malaria, dengue, and recent increases in tuberculosis.

The panel discusses how "new" diseases arise and how "old" ones resurge and considers the roles of human demographics and behavior, technology and industry, economic development and land use, international travel and commerce, microbial adaptation and change, and breakdown of public health measures in changing patterns of infectious disease.

Also included are discussions and recommendations on disease surveillance; vaccine, drug, and pesticide development; vector control; public education and behavioral change; research and training; and strengthening of the U.S. public health system.

This volume will be of immediate interest to scientists specializing in all areas of infectious diseases and microbiology, healthy policy specialists, public health officials, physicians, and medical faculty and students, as well as anyone interested in how their health can be threatened by infectious diseases.

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