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Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy (2019)

Chapter: Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

C-1 As part of this effort, the research team sought to apply the methods outlined in this guide- book to three real-world airports—Charlottesville Albemarle Airport, Dayton International Airport, Portland International Airport—seeking to develop their own Renewable Resources Strategies. The research team worked with each airport to develop the following strategies, which are included as an illustration of how the principles presented in this guidebook can be applied to airports of differing scales, each with their own constraints, challenges, and opportunities. A P P E N D I X C Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies

C-2 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Prepared for CHO Management May 2018 Charlottesville Albemarle Airport (CHO) Renewable Resource Strategy DRAFT

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-3 Table of Contents Table of Contents ............................................................................................................................ 2 Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 3 Vision Statement & Goals ............................................................................................................... 4 Vision Statement ......................................................................................................................... 4 Goals ............................................................................................................................................ 4 Baseline & Airport Systems ............................................................................................................. 5 Electricity Consumption and Cost ............................................................................................... 5 Water Consumption and Cost ..................................................................................................... 5 Waste Generated and Disposal Cost ........................................................................................... 5 Airline Related Waste .................................................................................................................. 5 Process for Identifying Opportunities ............................................................................................. 6 Agenda item at Monthly Tenant Meetings ................................................................................. 6 Stakeholders, Roles, and Responsibilities ................................................................................... 6 Approval Process for Renewable Resource Projects .................................................................. 6 Relationship to Other Documents ............................................................................................... 6 Updating the Strategy ................................................................................................................. 6 Planned Projects and Initiatives ...................................................................................................... 7 2

C-4 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Introduction About This Document This document contains a summary of the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport’s strategy to increase the use of renewable resources through projects and initiatives that reduce waste, reduce fuel consumption or offset other non-renewable resources with more environmentally friendly alternatives. The purpose of the document is to contain and summarize CHO’s various renewable resource efforts, initiatives and projects providing a valuable tool for airport leadership and stakeholders to demonstrate CHO’s leadership in evaluating and deploying renewable resources. Charlottesville and Albemarle County Located along the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Charlottesville and Albemarle County offer a unique experience in a picturesque setting. The quality of life the area offers is enjoyed year around by residents and visitors alike. Many of the area attractions are outdoors or involve outdoor activities. The local desire to promote and preserve this quality of life is strong among the residents. The Airport Authority is committed to working in partnership with the community and its many organizations to preserve this way of life. Considered the “Gateway to Central Virginia,” the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport should set an example of environmental stewardship for all who visit and use the airport regularly. 3

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-5 Vision Statement & Goals Vision Statement CHO is committed to the principles of environmental stewardship. CHO will strive to preserve our natural resources, operate efficiently, promote the airport as a steward of the environment, enhance our passenger experience and serve as a vital asset for Charlottesville, Albemarle County and Central Virginia. Goals Through the implementation of this strategy, CHO seeks to achieve the following goals: 1. Upgrade Facilities for Better Efficiency. 2. Reduce Weather-adjusted Utility Costs 20% below 2016 levels by Year 2025 and by 10% by 2020. 3. Serve as a Model of “Green” Success and Efficiency for the County and the Region. 4

C-6 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Baseline & Airport Systems Electricity Consumption and Cost • Heating Oil – Average 3,300 consumed per month/$9,000 per month (average $3.00 per gallon). • Electricity – Average $14,200 per month Water Consumption and Cost • Terminal Consumption Monthly Average (gallons): 135,000 • Terminal Average Monthly Cost: $2,400 Waste Generated and Disposal Cost • Generated waste – Average 288 cubic yards per month/$2,000 per month disposal costs. Airport Related Waste • Waste Oil Generated and Disposal Costs – Less than 250 gallons per year/annual disposal costs, less than $100. 5

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-7 Process for Identifying Opportunities Agenda item at Monthly Tenant Meetings Present to Director of Operations Stakeholders, Roles, and Responsibilities Stakeholder Role Responsibilities Airport Authority Approve Keep program on track and in focus Tenants Participate Work with airport staff and keep up with program Airport Staff Monitor Confirm Participation and report to Airport Authority Approval Process for Renewable Resource Projects • Return on Investment analysis and expectations • Presentation to Executive Director and Airport Authority • Incorporate into Capital Improvement Program • Identify Funding Sources and Incorporate into Budget Relationship with Other Documents • Airport Layout Plan • Master Plan • Airport Capital Improvement Program • Airport Authority Budget Updating the Strategy Stakeholder feedback Tenant Surveys 6

C-8 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Planned Projects and Initiatives Timeline Project Description Task Lead 1Q2018 Recycling Program Official launch of public-facing recycling program and engagement with all tenants, including: • Public facing education materials • Training for tenants and airport staff • Placement of all necessary bins/containers Director of Operations 1Q2018 Terminal LED Retrofit Phase 1 Phase 1 nearing completion; 98% terminal lighting replaced with LED Maintenance Superintendent 2Q2018 Gas Utility Engagement • Outreach to Natural Gas provider to extend service to airport terminal. BCA underway with Natural Gas Provider • Calculate GHG emissions reductions for switching to natural gas Director of Ops & Maintenance Superintendent 2Q2018 Parking Lot LED Retrofit • Retrofit of Parking lot lighting to LED included in parking lot expansion project design. • Feasibility of solar power arrays for parking lot canopy lighting. Director of Operations 3Q2018 Energy Consumption • Establish baseline of kilowatt consumption prior to terminal LED retrofit. Establish baseline for parking lot • Develop and retain a “sustainability” intern to track energy consumption • Prepare outreach piece/website article on lighting retrofit and recycling program Director of Ops & Airport Intern 4Q2018 Boiler Replacement • Bids released for replacement of heat oil boiler system to natural gas • Calculate GHG emissions savings expected Director of Ops & Maintenance Superintendent 7 electricity consumption.

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-9 plans and specifications for chiller system replacement in terminal building. 3Q2019 Chiller Replacement Release for public bid the replacement of the chiller system in the airport terminal building Director of Ops & Maintenance Superintendent 3Q2019 Feasibility Review Review energy consumption in parking lot and determine the ROI of solar powered lighting in parking lots Director of Ops & Airport Intern 1Q2020 Terminal Improvements Design Determine the ROI of proposed terminal improvements to incorporate solar power Executive Director 1Q2019 Chiller Replacement Release a request for qualifications to obtain an engineering firm to develop Director of Ops & Maintenance Superintendent 8

C-10 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy ManagementPrepared for DAY JUNE 2018 Dayton International Airport (DAY) Renewable Resource Strategy

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-11 Table of Contents Table of Contents ............................................................................................................................ 2 Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 3 Vision Statement & Goals ............................................................................................................... 4 Our Mission ................................................................................................................................. 4 Our Visions .................................................................................................................................. 4 Baseline & Airport Systems ............................................................................................................. 5 Electricity Consumption and Cost ............................................................................................... 5 Water Consumption and Cost ..................................................................................................... 5 Waste Generated and Disposal Cost ........................................................................................... 6 Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Costs .......................................................................................... 6 Airline Related Waste .................................................................................................................. 8 Process for Identifying Opportunities ............................................................................................. 9 Agenda item at Monthly Tenant/Airline Managers Meetings .................................................... 9 Stakeholders, Roles, and Responsibilities ................................................................................... 9 Approval Process for Renewable Resource Projects ................................................................ 11 Relationship to Other Documents ............................................................................................. 12 Updating the Strategy ............................................................................................................... 19 Planned Projects and Initiatives .................................................................................................... 20 2

C-12 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Introduction What is a Renewable Resource? A Renewable Resource is a resource that can be replenished over a meaningful timescale in terms of a human lifespan. We may think of it as any natural resource that can replenish itself. It is a substance of economic value that can be replaced or replenished in the same or less amount of time as it takes to draw the supply down. Some renewable resources have essentially an endless supply, such as solar energy, wind energy and geothermal pressure, while other resources are considered renewable even though some time or effort must go into their renewal, such as wood, biofuels or leather. Most precious metals may be considered renewable as well; even though they are not naturally replaced, they are not destroyed during their extraction and use and can be recycled. Renewable resources can be found in more than just electricity, but also in categories including, food, heating, fuels, building materials, and waste management. For example, consider an airport that installs a biomass boiler to provide heating for a terminal building and reduce the use of heating oil. The airport uses a renewable resource (biofuel) to provide utility (heating) to airport customers, tenants, and staff. Our plan will focus on renewable resources that provide airport stakeholders with equal or greater value than that offered by non-renewable resources. We will prioritize renewable resources that offset a non-renewable resource, reduce costs and improve the customer experience. Implementing a Strategy based on Renewable Resources is necessary to maintain the economic viability of the Airport and the Region as a whole. It directly supports our Sustainability Master Plan and is our guide to improving our Operations while reducing our Environmental Impact. Dayton International Airport Prairie Project 3

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-13 Vision Statement & Goals Our Mission Similar to our Sustainability Mission, We strive to conserve our natural resources, operate efficiently, promote Airport employees’ well-being, enhance our passenger experience and serve as a vital asset for Southwest Ohio and beyond. Our Visions Energy Optimization: We want to maximize energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy sources through system optimization, innovative design methodology and economic feasibility. Resiliency: We will implement measures that prepare the Airport to mitigate the effects of climate change and support regional climate change mitigation plans and activities. Environmental Steward: As a corporate and community leader minimize the Airport’s consumption of natural resources and its impact on the surrounding environment Sustainable Investment: We contribute to regional economic growth through sustainable investments of our land, capital, and human resources. Dayton Airshow 4

C-14 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Baseline & Airport Systems Electricity Consumption and Cost 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Consumption (kwh) 15,340,256 15,247,808 14,772,387 15,469,302 14,459,945 13,710,821 Cost ($$$) $1,373,109 $1,216,253 $1,312,078 $1,267,353 $1,102,349 $1,027,943 Water Consumption and Cost $0 $500,000 $1,000,000 $1,500,000 12,500,000 13,000,000 13,500,000 14,000,000 14,500,000 15,000,000 15,500,000 16,000,000 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Consumption (kwh) Cost ($$$) $0.00 $50,000.00 $100,000.00 $150,000.00 $200,000.00 0.00 100,000.00 200,000.00 300,000.00 400,000.00 500,000.00 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Gallons Cost 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Gallons 353,477.01 331,147.66 451,995.46 306,566.67 357,696.02 448,831.20 Cost $111,304.15 $102,655.77* $140,454.86 $104,779.23 $121,095.09 $145,717.35 *Estimated 5

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-15 Waste Generated and Disposal Cost 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Cost ($$$) $44,909.57 $35,997.33 $39,538.11 $46,656.59 $46,710.91 $44,133.95 Recycled Cardboard 37.0 15.5 43.8 37.1 37.3 32.6 Commingled Recyclables 28.5 56.6 63.6 39.7 23.9 42.4 Metal Recycled 37.6 31.2 28.8 25* 23.0 Trash 156.4 154.3 269.4 299.2 267.0 330.6 Construction Debris 24.1 9.9 20.5 46.3 24.9 23.1 Total (tons) 246.0 273.9 428.5 451.0 353.1 451.6 *Estimated 6

C-16 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy 7

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-17 Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Costs 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Gasoline 30,927.00 40,156.00 76,483.00 74,923.00 69,473.00 65,917.00 Diesel 22,279.00 29,629.00 41,975.60 29,276.00 25,612.00 24,101.00 Cost $ 172,245 $ 225,622 $ 358,665 TBD TBD TBD Airline Related Waste Airport Staff will continue to coordinate with Airlines and provide receptacles for Airline Co- Mingled and Cardboard Recycling. Airlines and tenants are permitted to dispose of their recyclable materials in the Airport Recycling Receptacles. 8

C-18 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Process for Identifying Opportunities Agenda item at Monthly Tenant/Airline Managers Meetings The Airline Managers meeting is normally held on the second Wednesday of every month. During this meeting the agenda will include a request for ideas and input for using Renewable Resources. Stakeholders, Roles, and Responsibilities Stakeholder Description Roles and Responsibilities Director of Aviation Head of the Department of Aviation Develops the long term strategy of the Airport and coordinates the implementation of the plan including direction, staffing, finances, and schedules. Reports to the City Manager. Deputy Director of Aviation Oversees Operations. Takes direction from and reports to Director of Aviation Implements the Director’s long term strategy and coordinates the day to day operations. Aviation Finance Manager Lead Financial Planner and Accountant. Reports to the Director of Aviation Manages the Finances of the Airport enterprise. Establishes budgets for both the Airport Operations and AIP projects. Aviation Operations Manager Manages the Aviation field operations and Facilities Maintenance. Reports to Deputy Director of Aviation. Operations would maintain any equipment installed for any project. Aviation Marketing Manager Reports to Director of Aviation Develops various Marketing strategies to promote the Airport and encourage new business and customers. Is instrumental in promoting the benefits of our renewable resource projects. Aviation Planning and Engineering Manager Reports to Deputy Director of Aviation Oversees and coordinates the Engineering Team. Establishes priorities for future and developing projects. Administers the AIP Program Aviation Environmental Manager Reports to Engineering Manager Coordinates sustainable and energy saving activities. Develops operational data for evaluation and 9

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-19 decision making. Maintains compliance with environmental permitting. Airport IT Manager Reports to Deputy Director of Aviation Manages and maintains the Airport computer and server technology. Is instrumental in coordinating the equipment controls and data logging equipment to integrate in to the Airport systems. Airport Engineering Consultant Team Consultant Engineering Firms. Report to Aviation Planning and Engineering Manager Coordinates with FAA for the planning of future projects, develops the 10 year plan for the Airport Improvement Projects and establishes initial budgets. Designs airport projects and creates bid documents. Administers construction of projects. City Manager Manages the City. Reports to the City of Dayton Commission Approves of planned projects at the Airport. Ultimately responsible for the Airport’s success to the City of Dayton Commission. Airport District Offices Federal Regulatory Agency Approves the Airport Improvement Program and federal funding to implement the program. City of Vandalia Neighboring City Coordination and/or notification of any major land development or alteration activities. Review/approval of work done on campus land in City of Vandalia. Montgomery County County Government Coordination and/or notification of any major land development or alteration activities. Review/approval of work done on campus land that may affect the County. Butler Township Neighboring Township Coordination and/or notification of any major land development or alteration activities. Review/approval of work done on campus land that may affect the township. Aullwood Audubon Center Nature Center Partner on Prairie Grass Project. Dayton Power and Light Electric Utility Review and approve electric distribution rates/changes and any requests to interconnect new generation onsite. Vectren Natural Gas Utility Review and approve all changes to natural gas service or new natural gas consuming equipment. 10

C-20 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Approval Process for Renewable Resource Projects When developing new projects, please consult the table above for relevant parties to inform. In addition, note the prioritization and funding approval requirements below. Setting Priorities The approval process for renewable resources projects will be based on the process outlined in the Sustainability Playbook developed with the Airport’s Sustainability Master Plan. Although the process will vary based on the scale of the effort, in general, it will follow the prioritization Matrix outlined on page 6 of the Playbook. For each renewable resource project, locate the project on the matrix below based on its positive effect on operations, reduced environmental impact, cost to implement and cost to maintain. The initiatives with the highest positive effect with the lowest cost will be considered to be the highest priority. Initiatives which fall toward the center of the graph are also prioritized in the same way, however additional factors such as Return on Investment, number of operational efficiencies, and level of staffing involvement will also be considered more heavily in the prioritization process. 11 X-Y Graph (Cost vs. Effectiveness) for evaluating 2- part score

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-21 Funding All projects must be addressed in the Operating or Capital Improvement Budgets of the Department of Aviation. The Finance Manager can advise on the available sources of funds and their allowable uses. In general, if a project scores as a high priority and has been assigned a budget, the project can be paid for in several ways: For projects costing $500 or less and approved by Department Manager and Finance Manager, the project may be paid for by Purchasing Card (credit card). For projects costing $500.01-$2,500 and approved by Department Manager and Finance Manager, the project manager may elect to establish a Purchase Order (PO) to pay for the project. For projects costing more than $2,500 and less than $10,000, a PO is required. PO’s require the approval and signature of the Department Manager and Director of Aviation. Projects costing greater than $10,000 also require presentation and approval by the City of Dayton Commission. Relationship to Other Documents This strategy is part of the overall strategic planning process for the airport and interacts with or supplements several other important documents. In developing, updating, and executing this strategy the airport will consider implications on the following documents. Airport Layout Plan The ALP is the fundamental airport planning tool for defining existing conditions and identifying future opportunities. The FAA requires an approved ALP and all requests for funding presented to the FAA must be consistent with the ALP before receiving authorization. In October 2013, the FAA issued Standard Operating Procedure 2.00, Standard Procedure for FAA Review and Approval of Airport Layout Plans to provide guidance to sponsors on ALPs. The FAA has also released Advisory Circular (AC) 150/5070-6B, which provides a variety of information useful in developing and refining ALPs. As detailed in FAA guidance to airport sponsors, an ALP must show: • Boundaries and proposed additions to all areas owned or controlled by the sponsor for airport purposes; • The location and nature of existing and proposed airport facilities and structures; and 12

C-22 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy • The location on the airport property of existing and proposed non-aviation areas and improvements thereon. Standard Operating Procedure 2.00 specifies the information required in an ALP submission. Such required information includes detailed engineering plans of the airport showing existing and future conditions, as well as a narrative description of proposed projects, aircraft activity forecasts to justify future projects, and a general plan for funding. All federally-obligated airports are required under grant assurances (i.e., the legal contract between airport operators and the FAA) to “keep the ALP up-to-date at all times.” An ALP requires updating if it fails to: • Adequately provide for future needs; • Conform with current airport design standards; • Accurately reflect existing features; or • Reflect airport and critical land use changes that may affect the navigable airspace or the ability of the airport to expand. In practice, an ALP that has not been updated for several years is usually deficient in all four respects. Because every airport is different, and its progress toward development varies by size, geography, and market forces, the FAA does not specify when an ALP is out-of-date. Before the ALP can be the blueprint for the airport development program, the FAA must formally approve it. ALP approval includes evaluation of compliance by the FAA under an 13

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-23 Airspace Review and NEPA. Once approved, any project identified on the ALP is eligible for federal funding from the FAA. The AIP Handbook states that "a current ALP that depicts the proposed project and that has FAA approval from the standpoint of safety, utility, and efficiency of the airport shall be required before a development project is approved” (FAA 2014). The ALP may be updated separately from a larger planning process for many reasons, including the need to address a new and unanticipated development opportunity. However, any time an airport undertakes a Master Plan prepared consistent with FAA guidance, the final product must include an updated ALP. Airports can designate areas of airfield on the ALP for renewable resource uses. Typically, such designations are supported by other studies such as those associated with a Master Plan, investigations to confirm a project’s compatibility, and an understanding of technical and financial feasibility. Renewable resource projects are classified as non-aeronautical uses, so if an airport intends to situate such a project in an area designated for aeronautical uses, it will need to request a change in usage designation from aeronautical to non-aeronautical. An airport can update the ALP to include renewable resources as part of long-term planning or to fulfill a condition of an individual project’s approval. In either case, the FAA will ensure that the project ultimately is consistent with the airport’s long-term interests in supporting aviation activities. Renewable resource projects that impact land owned by the airport must be coordinated with the Airport Layout Plan (ALP). Examples may include ground mounted PV arrays, crop planting, or installations requiring new buildings or changes in land use. The ALP is overseen by Airport Engineering and the latest version can be found on the Aviation Server: Drawings\DAY\ALP Updates 2018. Terminal Master Plan Much as the Airport Master Plan covers general long-term planning for the airport, the Terminal Master Plan governs the planned activities, upgrades, and development of the terminal and related facilities. Renewable resource activities that take place in or on the terminal must be coordinated with the Terminal Master Plan. Examples could include roof-mounted solar PV systems, changes to the recycling program, new signage, or energy efficiency measures. The Terminal Master Plan is overseen by Airport Engineering and the latest version can be found on the Aviation Server: Drawings\Terminal Master Plan. 14

C-24 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Airport Master Plan An airport Master Plan, which may include the ALP process, is a comprehensive study of an airport. It describes existing conditions, forecasts future aviation activity, and presents short-, medium-, and long-term development plans to meet the forecasted demand. Given the uncertainty in forecasting future economic activity, airport Master Plans are "living" documents that require regular updating to reflect changing conditions. To maximize its usefulness to the airport managers, the Master Plan goals should include: • Graphical representations of existing airport features, future airport development, and anticipated land use; • A realistic schedule for implementation of the proposed development; • An appropriate financial plan to support the development; • Plan validation through investigation of concepts and alternatives on technical, economic, and environmental grounds; • A public presentation component that adequately addresses all relevant issues and satisfies local, state, and federal regulations; and • A framework for a continuous planning process. Advisory Circular (AC) AC 150/5070-6B helps airports prepare useful Master Plans; however, the FAA does not approve or endorse all aspects of the Master Plan. The FAA only approves 15

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-25 forecasts, selection of critical aircraft, and the ALP. It is from these elements that the FAA determines eligibility of AIP funding for proposed development. The Master Plan provides an overview of several issues that may arise during project development, including consistency with the ALP, environmental issues, and funding. Once projects proceed with development, they must address each issue in detail before finalizing design and development and undertaking construction. The airport’s Renewable Resources Strategy can be addressed in detail in a Master Plan under sections related to environment, energy, and sustainability. The airport may also present a broad vision of sustainability in the Master Plan or focus on sustainability and energy issues in separate plans (as discussed below). Regardless of how the airport addresses renewable resource planning, it will need to understand the opportunities associated with renewable resources and how those opportunities meet the airport’s interest in the triple bottom line of economic, environmental, and social benefits. The Airport Master Plan is overseen by Airport Engineering and the latest version can be found on the Aviation Server: Drawings\DAY. Airport Capital Improvement Program The FAA maintains a national Airports Capital Improvement Plan (ACIP) to identify and prioritize critical airport development necessary to support the National Airspace System. The ACIP also serves as the basis for distributing annual FAA grant funds under the AIP. The FAA applies a rigorous process with input from regional offices and airport sponsors to maximize contributions from a broad array of decision-makers. FAA guidance associated with the ACIP is provided in the ACIP Order (FAA Order 5100.39A). The projects in the ACIP support the following FAA goals: • Ensure that the air transport of people, services, and goods is provided in a safe and secure environment; • Preserve and upgrade the existing airport system to enable increased capacity as well as to ensure reliable and efficient use of existing capacity; • Improve the compatibility of airports with the surrounding communities; and • Provide the majority of the American public with sufficient airport access. Each year, FAA regional and airport district offices prepare regional ACIPs based on the previous years’ plan. The ACIP identifies and prioritizes projects for funding over a ten-year period and is updated annually. In preparing the ACIP, FAA regional staff consider the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (NPIAS) and other guidance from the FAA national office. It also relies on contributions from airport sponsors, state aviation agencies, and aviation organizations, including airport-prepared ACIPs and the planning studies that support them. 16

C-26 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Regional offices then send the ACIP to FAA headquarters for a detailed national review. The national review ensures that the regional plans are consistent with FAA agency goals and policies, and that the national plan covers agency priorities for the upcoming year. It also integrates proposals for submission for national program funding and determines which projects require a benefit-cost analysis (BCA). The result is a preliminary list or “candidate list” of projects to be considered for discretionary funding that is returned to the regional offices for review. Should the regions seek to add projects to the candidate list, they must show how the project meets one or more of the following objectives: • Enhance safety or security; • Enhance system capacity; • Enhance environment; • Enhance access to the airport system; or • Support state and local plans. Once the following fiscal year appropriation is enacted by Congress, the FAA national office forwards allocations to each region, and the regional office develops recommended funding plans with projects identified and forwards the list to FAA headquarters for approval. Projects that are included in the candidate list and receive funding approval from the regional office will be considered as priority projects to receive converted “carryover” funding. Projects that do not receive funding must be revalidated for need and either placed in the NPIAS-ACIP for consideration in a future year, or deleted from the database. CIPs typically address significant capital expenditures such as buildings, runways, roadways and other infrastructure, and land. Most renewable resource projects are not identified as standalone projects on the CIP, but are included as components of other larger projects. There are exceptions, including projects funded by the FAA’s authority under the Voluntary Airport Low Emission (VALE) Program and the Section 512 Energy Program. Each of these authorization methods provides a separate avenue for airports to apply for AIP funding for emission reduction and energy efficiency projects. The CIP process and the financial analyses associated with ALP and Master Plan are all important for determining potential funding sources for all airport projects. For renewable resource projects, funding sources may include alternative financial structures, such as private-public partnerships, which can enable airports to join forces with executives from the private sector to develop non-aviation projects. In general, projects associated with Planning and Capital, exceeding $10,000 in value, are coordinated with the ACIP process. That process is led by the Aviation Director’s Office and the latest version of the ACIP can be found on the Aviation Server: Drawings\2018 CIP. 17

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-27 Sustainability Master Plan In 2010, the FAA began issuing grant funding to airports to develop sustainability plans under its Sustainable Master Plan Pilot Program. The purpose of the pilot program was to help airports identify sustainability objectives and measures to minimize environmental impacts, increase operational efficiency, and provide benefits to local communities. In support of this objective, the FAA issued its Interim Guidance for FAA's Sustainable Master Plan Pilot Program in May 2010, followed by FAA Lessons Learned from Sustainable Master Plan Pilot Program in December 2012. The pilot program initially awarded funding to 12 airports to help them integrate sustainability into their long-term Master Planning. Some of the recipient airports developed standalone SMPs separately from their traditional airport Master Planning process, and others incorporated SMPs into their general airport Master Plans. As a separate document from the Master Plan, the SMP requires the preparation of more background information both on the airport and on sustainability, whereas the SMP can be included as a Chapter or Appendix to the Master Plan and utilize the other Chapters as background and context. In both cases, the FAA's objective was to help airports to develop a framework for a sustainability plan and a process for preparation and implementation. The initial plans included topics associated with energy and waste that most directly correlate with renewable resources. However, in general, reducing consumption was prioritized over increasing the use of renewables. Additionally, airports may incorporate “green” or environmental purchasing practices into their sustainability plans. This means that the airport commits to buying goods and services that improve public health and safety, reduce pollution, and conserve natural resources. In fact, Seattle-Tacoma Airport adopted an Environmental Purchasing Policy in 2009 and is dedicated to having these environmental considerations factor into the purchasing practice equally with other factors like price, availability, and performance. DAY has a robust SMP developed, which includes a variety of useful information relevant to developing renewable resource projects. The current SMP can be found on the Aviation Server: Public\Sustainability\Sustainability Master Plan, and should be consulted during the early planning phase for any new renewable resources project. Questions on the SMP should be directed to: Airport Environmental 18

C-28 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Sustainability Design and Construction Standards For new construction and major renovation, staff and consultants should review and follow the requirements of the Sustainable Design and Construction Standards. This document outlines design requirements, materials to be used, and other key information governing onsite construction practices. When planning renewable resource projects that require such construction, planners reference these standards as a requirement in bid specifications and similar documents. This document is maintained by Airport Engineering and the latest version can be found on the Aviation Server: Public\Sustainability\Sustainable Design and Construction Standards. Annual Budget The airport budget is the annual operating budget for the airport, focusing on non-capital costs and projects. As described above, projects requiring funding must be included in the annual budget, which is prepared beginning in August of each year for the following year. The section on Funding, above, provides more specific requirements related to budget thresholds. Updating the Strategy The Dayton International Airport Renewable Resource Strategy will be updated annually. As the Airport Statistics and sustainability metrics are updated, this strategy will be reviewed for its impact on them. Stakeholder feedback Feedback from monthly meetings and evaluations from proposed ideas will also be reviewed as part of the process. Management will review the consolidated stakeholder feedback from monthly meetings, proposed projects and existing projects and incorporate that feedback into the strategy as appropriate. 19

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-29 Planned Projects and Initiatives Timeline Project Description Task Lead 2019 Restaurant Recycling with HMS Host Set up a simple recycling station at the Fast Food Type Restaurants and include a Liquid Collection Station. Airport Environmental 2019 Explore Feasibility of Bio- Jet fuel Coordinate with FBO fuel supplier and PSA Airlines to investigate the feasibility of using bio Jet Fuel in a dedicated aircraft. Airport Environmental 2019 Explore the feasibility of stocking a bio diesel blend Coordinate with local fuel supplier on the feasibility of stocking Bio-Diesel Blend for Field Maintenance Vehicles. Airport Operations 2019 Re-evaluate solar/storage microgrid Continue to re-evaluate the opportunities to develop battery storage and a solar array on the airport. Airport Engineering 2018 Verify Existing Conditions Continue to develop and monitor opportunities to include renewable resources as a strategy to manage our energy, waste streams and building materials. Airport Environmental 20

C-30 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Renewable Resources Strategy ACRP 02-72 Core Team INTRODUCTION

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-31 Context/Drivers •Cost Management •Controllable utility expense. •Stakeholder (Community) Expectations •Increasing need to manage risks associated with energy and carbon. •Interest from Governor on what we are doing for our slice. How are we pushing our customers? Show what we are doing for leadership. May give time for customer questions •Regulatory expectations •"Cap and invest" bill, 1.5% for Green Energy Technology (GET). •Green brand management •Demonstrate the Port’s sustainability efforts to the public. •Resource scarcity/physical risks •Hedge against scarcity of energy resources. EXISTING PLANS

C-32 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Energy and Carbon Management Master Plan • Refine the Port’s carbon emissions inventory to remove carbon emissions attributable to Port tenants. • Update policies for procurement and project design/implementation to ensure that energy and carbon efficiency is maximized for new equipment and projects. • Capitalize on electric utilities’ carbon intensity reductions and response to Oregon’s Renewable Portfolio Standard. • Pursue Energy and Carbon Opportunities (ECOs) to minimize energy use and carbon emissions from Port facilities. • Bridge the gap between the Port’s emissions performance and its goal using RECs or offsets. • Develop an adaptive management plan for carbon emissions that continuously measures the Port’s progress towards its goal as well as adjusting its efforts to reflect changing conditions. VISION STATEMENT

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-33 Vision Statement Keywords: net zero, demand, resiliency, investments, airlines, tenants, share, leadership We will: 1. become a net-zero energy airport by generating more energy than we use, and the energy we generate will be renewable energy; 2. source all new future PDX power demand from energy efficiency and renewable energy sources; 3. use on-site renewable energy generation and energy storage to support PDX resiliency goals; 4. design, time and locate our investments in renewable energy to be as cost-effective as possible given other Port goals; 5. actively encourage airlines and the military that use PDX to use sustainable (renewable) aviation fuels in aircraft that operate at PDX; 6. require the use of renewable energy in tenant and partner facilities at PDX; 7. seek to share our generation / resiliency capacity with our community and neighbors; and we will 8. be recognized by our region and industry as a leader in the application of renewable energy. Terminal Core Redevelopment (TCORE) The Terminal Core Redevelopment program is a modernization of PDX, necessary to ensure sufficient capacity for future passenger demand, upgrade seismic resiliency, and replace aging systems and infrastructure. – Enhance Capacity – Asset Renewal – Enhance Seismic Resiliency – Increase Flexibility – Ensure World Class Customer Experience 8

C-34 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy 9 PDXNext TCORE Objectives $785M $325M $275M $1,385M Capacity (2045) Flexibility Asset Renewal Resilience Total TCORE Capacity Expansion: $710M Renew Terminal Assets: $325M Seismic Upgrade to Existing Terminal: $275M Concourse B: $75M $1,385 Million BASELINE CONDITIONS AND FORECAST

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-35 Electricity Usage 10,000,000 - 20,000,000 30,000,000 40,000,000 50,000,000 60,000,000 70,000,000 PDXCUP PDX Others TTD HIO T2 T4 T6/Rivergate Navigation Port Operating Area Specific kWh Usage 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Energy Efficiency

C-36 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Renewable Energy PDX Terminal • 140 Panels, Partnership with Nike and NWA • PV system power: 31.500 kWp • Energy Generated 2017: 31,629.8 kWh Deicing Stormwater Treatment Facility • 120 Panels, Partnership with PP&L Blue Sky (Grant) • PV system power: 33.911 kWp • Energy Generated 2017: 20,516.3 kWh • 32 Panels • PV system power: 6.300 kWp • Energy Generated 2017: 4,945.3 kWh Natural Gas Usage

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-37 Carbon Emissions Forecast – Waterfall Chart • Near term increase in electricity demand due to projects (QTA, TBAL, PACR, TCORE) and electrification • Near term decrease in energy use intensity (EUI) due to energy efficiency measures (Portfolio 2 and 3, other measures) • External Factors (Utility RPS projection) • Regulatory (Cap and Invest) • Vision and Goals (NZE and Carbon Neutrality) • Long term CIP impact • Funding applications • Carbon Inventory

C-38 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Current Path to Carbon Neutrality Vision Path to Carbon Neutrality

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-39 Obstacles Determining most cost effective path Predicting future costs of investments and risk of business as usual Effectively valuing modernization and resiliency GOALS

C-40 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Net Zero PDX-controlled airport operations will achieve carbon neutrality by 2035 Electrification (TCORE or PDX-Controlled?) – eGSE – Domestic Hot Water (75% by 2023), (100% by 2028) – Heating (25-50% by 2023), (100% by 2028) – Cooking by Concessions (10% by 2023), (100% by 2028) Energy Efficiency – Reduce Port-wide energy consumption (kWh) by 20% from 2011 baseline by 2020 – Achieve energy efficiency target of 45 w/m2 by 2035 Renewable Energy – 100% power sources for PDX-controlled facilities from renewables by 2035 Climate Carbon Reduction – Reduce CO2 emissions 15% below 1990 levels by 2020 – Reduce aircraft level Greenhouse Gas emissions from PDX from 2010 levels by 25% by 2035. Climate Adaptation – Resiliency – Microgrid

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-41 RENEWABLE RESOURCES AVAILABLE IN THE REGION Biomass • Facility that burns plant matter to produce electricity or heat • Wood fuel plant (torrefaction) announced for John Day to produce 100,000 tons of wood briquettes per year • HM3 Torrefaction Demonstration Plant in Troutdale • Fuel was proposed to replace coal fuel at Portland General Electric’s Boardman Plant before it was decided to close it down

C-42 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Geothermal Electricity transmitted to Grid Not used for on-site use Iceland 100% Geothermal Powered Ground Source Heat Exchange

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-43 Hydro • Most abundant renewable energy in the world • Primarily feeds electricity to a regional grid rather than providing on-site power 15% of PGE electricity mix is from Hydro Subgroup: Low impact hydro or run-of-the-river hydro Ocean • Pacific Marine Energy Center • Wave energy test sites off Oregon coast • University-led effort funded by US Department of Energy • South Energy Test Site is developing a grid-compatible facility

C-44 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Solar Top Ten Solar States 1 California 2 North Carolina 3 Arizona 4 Nevada 5 New Jersey 6 Massachusetts 7 Texas 8 Utah 9 Georgia 10 Florida 1 3 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 * Markets are driven by State Energy Policy Photovoltaic (PV) Panels - electricity Thermal Panels - heat Concentrating Solar Power (mirrors) - electricity Solar PV Solar PV – Cost to Install Why? • Simple technology • Integrates into landscape • Less controversial • Easy to develop • Sun shines everywhere ~30% of all new electricity generation in 2017 came from utility scale solar PV

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-45 Wind • ~20% of all new electricity generation in 2017 • Wind produced by large wind farms with turbines 500 feet tall and electricity fed into the electric grid • Wind turbines are not compatible with aviation • Through the first quarter of 2017, Oregon ranked 7th in wind power production Windy Areas Sustainable Aviation Fuels • Fuel produced from plant matter • Used to power ground vehicles and aircraft • Road transportation fuels not suitable for aircraft • Sustainable Aviation Fuels • Drop-In – compatible with existing systems Ethanol

C-46 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy ENERGY EFFICIENCY Measures • Metering, Sub-metering, and Information Systems Integration • Commissioning and retro-commissioning • Replacement of existing equipment with more efficient alternatives – Lighting – HVAC – Motors – Office equipment • Other

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-47 OPTIONS FOR PROCURING RENEWABLE RESOURCES Construct On-site • Construct energy generation facility for on-site consumption – All electricity consumed within the airport's electricity infrastructure – Example: Solar PV on an existing building – Advantage: Simple approach; visible to public; less electricity acquired from utility; may gain efficiencies if connected to other construction projects – Disadvantage: Many small projects, more costly due to lack of economies of scale • Construct energy generation facility and transmit energy to the utility's grid – Electricity is delivered to the utility grid, purchased back via an energy contract – Example: Solar PV on a remote parcel of airport land – Advantage: Less costly due to economies of scale; option for third party owner – Disadvantage: Requires surplus land, close to point of interconnection • Applicable to: Biomass, Ground Source Heating, Hydro (Low Impact), Solar PV

C-48 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Obtain from Off-site • Construct and own facility at off-Site location – Power generated off-site but credited to Port's accounts elsewhere – Advantage: Economies of scale, better energy generation at off-site location (e.g., solar in Eastern Oregon) than Port's existing sites, could benefit General Fund – Disadvantage: Complicated policy arrangement, may not be allowed • Contract to purchase power directly from third party owned facility – Power generated off-site, credited to Port's accounts through Power Contract – Advantage: Economies of scale, more efficient generation – Disadvantage: Complicated policy arrangement, may not be allowed • Purchase Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) – Advantage: simple to accomplish by calling broker, no long-term commitment – Disadvantage: no direct ownership to a facility, lack of carbon ownership Utility-owned • Utility builds, owns, and operate a renewable energy facility; Port acquires all electricity produced – Advantages: • Economies of Scale • Utility operational expertise • Utility financing may be an economic advantage – Disadvantages: • Complicated policy, may not be allowable under existing state energy rules • Not as visible to public • Requires long-term commitment • Applicable to biomass, hydro, solar PV, wind

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-49 ASSESSMENT OF RENEWABLE RESOURCES Biomass • Grant County Regional Airport in John Day has a biomass heater in its LEED certified terminal (constructed in 2010) • Ketchikan Airport heats its terminal with a biomass system designed and constructed by Wisewood Energy, Portland Oregon in 2016. • Heathrow Airport installed a biomass system in 2012 constructed by the Austrian company VAS Energy Systems. It provides heat and electricity to Terminals 2 and 5. – Generates 9 MW thermal power, 1.8 MW of electricity – Powered by 25,000 tonnes of wood chips annually – Fuel sourced within a 100 mile radius of the airport – Heathrow states that the facility avoids 13,000 tonnes of CO2 annually compared to natural gas

C-50 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Geothermal / Ground Source Heating Airports with Ground Source Heating • Duluth (Minnesota) • Juneau (Alaska) • Nashville (Tennessee) • Portland (Maine) • South Bend (Indiana) • PDX HQP2 • "True" geothermal has not been developed cost-effectively at an airport Hydro / Ocean Power • Hydro power has not been developed by an airport • Cost effective ocean power development is far into the future

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-51 Wind • Cost-effective wind requires tall structures - limited potential unless acquired off- site • A few small scale turbines and building-mounted structures have been constructed Solar PV • Solar PV has been cost-effectively developed at airports

C-52 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Sustainable Aviation Fuels Renewable Resource Assessment for PDX Resource Type Location Availability Compatibility Accessible Environmental Cost Effective Overall Biomass On-site/Off-site High Medium High Low Medium Medium Geothermal Off-Site Medium High Low Medium Low Low Ground Source Heating On-Site High High High High Medium High Hydro (utility) Off-Site High High Low Low Low Low (low impact) On-Site High Medium Medium Medium Low Low Ocean Off-Site Medium High Low Medium Low Low Solar PV Off-Site High High High High High High On-Site High High High High Medium High Wind (utility) Off-Site High Low Medium Low Medium Medium (building) On-Site Low Medium Low Medium Low Low Sustainable Fuels On-Site High High Medium High Low Medium Availability: Is there resource available at PDX or region? High: Resource scores highest in this category Compatibility: Is technology for generation compatible with PDX? Medium: Resource scores in the middle for this category Accessible: Can the energy from the resource be accessed by PDX? Low: Resource scores lowest in this category Environmental: Are the environmental risks associated with generating the energy low? Cost Effective: Is generating energy from the resource cost-effective? Overall: Cumulative assessment of the potential for developing the resource

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-53 Airport Solar Design Options Solar PV Design, Installation Costs, and Production Estimates cdWM / aerA etamitsE)CD( tsoC dellatsnIeziSnoitacoL Ground-mounted On-site, surplus land, Off-Site > 2 MW $1.03/w 5 acres Canopy On-Site, Parking area 200 kW - 1 MW $2.27/w 5 acres Roof-mounted On-Site, Small building 3-10 kW $2.80/w 3 acres Roof-mounted On-Site, Large Building/Hangar 10 kW - 2 MW $1.85/w 3 acres Annual Electricity Generation for a 1 MWdc Solar Project PDX = 1,096,451 kWh Bend = 1,453,990 kWh (32% more electricity) * More cost-effective to locate project off-site in area with stronger solar resource It is more cost effective to integrate solar into new development than to retrofit it into existing development Source: Fu, R. et al. 2017. U.S. Solar Photovoltaic System Cost Benchmark: Q1 2017. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Assumptions: Includes all system and project development costs. Costs are from the perspective of the developer/installer. Represents the sales price paid to the installer; therefore, it includes profit in the cost of the hardware along with the profit of the installer/developer. It does not include any additional net profit such as developer fee or price gross-up

C-54 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy FINANCING PROJECTS Ownership Options Influence Financing

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-55 Airport Owned • Airport capitalizes, owns and operates the project • It contracts with an Engineering Procurement and Construction (EPC) firm that provides a turnkey solution • The airport may execute service contracts with the EPC or another contractor, and/or may integrate O&M into existing airport responsibilities. • Risk management summary: – Airport holds all risk associated with project development; however, risks associated with solar are lower than other renewable resources due to simple construction, predictable resource and revenue generation, simple operations – Financial risk associated with payback is high due to tax-based incentives that cannot be monetized by airport – Airport owns power and attributes; investment risk is predictable, and limited Third Party Owned • Airport provides property; it would likely seek to purchase the electricity and environmental attributes rather than only execute a property lease • Developer capitalizes project, owns and operates facility, and sells electricity and attributes • Airport may have an option to purchase the project after developer maximizes tax benefits • Risk management summary: – low development and operational risk to airport as developer assumes all risks – developer owns all assets including power and environmental attributes and seeks to sell those assets to a willing customer (such as the airport) – Buyer (ie, airport) commits to a long-term (15-20) contract for the power and environmental attributes

C-56 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy PDX Financing Plan • Cost Center Allocations for PDX Capital Improvement Projects – Airline Cost Center • Directly supporting Terminal/Airfield • Funded through debt service & included in Rates & Charges – Port Cost Center • Ground Transportation, Cargo, GA, & Non-Aviation • Cash Funded through Port Revenues – Shared Cost Center • Allocated between above – many projects likely to be allocated to CUP • Any need for grant/tax credit discussion? PLANNING FOR PROJECTS

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-57 • Long range development plan for Portland International Airport through 2035 • Collaborative planning process with Port of Portland, City of Portland and metropolitan community • Commitment to sustainability – “Avoid/minimize/mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and prepare to adapt to climate change.” • 3 Key Products – “The City and the Port affirm their commitment to sustainability and to applying principles that promote sustainability in future development at the Airport.” Master Plan Consistency Land Use Plan (City) IGA’s (City/Port) PDX Master Plan (Port) Plan Implementation – PDXNext & Current Opportunities PDXNext Terminal Balancing 100% Design/Construction Underway Complete mid-2020 Rental Car Quick Turn Around Under construction Opening March 2018 PDX Parking Additions and Consolidated Rental Car Facility (PACR) Complete mid 2021 PDXNext Terminal Core Redevelopment Construction start late 2019

C-58 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Planning Process – FAA Approvals • Standard Project Development Approach • Local permitting varies according to project location • Inside or outside Airport Operations Area fence • FAA approval will be key in certain areas • RPZ – Controlled Activity Areas • Compatibility with Wildlife Hazard Management Future Master Plan • Master plan or future sub-area plans represent opportunity to evaluate potential sites for renewables in light of other facility requirements • Opportunity to consider both developed and undeveloped areas of the airport and timeframes associated with each • Update of the Airport Layout Plan

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-59 Capital Planning & Approvals • Long-Range Capital Planning – Forecast projects out ~10 years – Search for opportunities to efficiently include renewable improvements in large capital projects • Approvals – Internal: approved through PPO process ~1 year in advance – AAAC: Airline MII approval required for projects over $1M affecting Airline Rates Investment Criteria – EONS Benefit Cost Analysis • Financial Responsibility - (E)conomic Viability – Life Cycle Cost per kWh, Impact to Airline Rates, NPV & Rate of Return • Operational Excellence - (O)perational Efficiency – Resilience • Environmental Leadership - (N)atural Resource Conservation – GHG Emissions Reduction • Equity - (S)ocial Responsibility – Benefit to Historically Underserved Communities • E+O+N+S > X%

C-60 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Stakeholders/Partners/Customers • Stakeholders – Internal – Division and departments -> refer to PPO Business Case process – External – Community, Advocacy groups, Emergency Service Providers, Emergency Planners • Partners – Utilities, Public policy (FAA, DOE, PUC, COP), Airlines, PPP, Military • Customers – Airlines, Tenants, Fuel Consortium, Neighborhoods (off airport) ACTION PLAN

Pilot Airport Renewable Resources Strategies C-61 Framework for Resource Allocation • Years 1-5, continued focus on energy efficiency, ramp up on renewables • Years 6-10, relative parity between energy efficiency and renewables • Years 11-20, changing focus on renewables as cost effectiveness of energy efficiency diminishes • Selection of energy investments to be determined based on cost-effectiveness (~80%), and resiliency/innovation (~20%) Potential Solar Development Sites at PDX

C-62 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy MEASURING PROGRESS

Next: Appendix D - Draft Scope of Work Language for Developing a Renewable Resources Strategy »
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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 197: Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy highlights renewable energy sources, includes steps for developing a renewable energy strategy, and identifies metrics for measuring success. The report also highlights real-world examples of successful renewable resource projects at airports.

Renewable resources to reduce emissions from airports and climate impacts have been discussed for several years. Technological advancements have allowed organizations, specifically airports, to begin integrating renewable resources into their overall energy plans. In an effort to address climate impacts and achieve neutral carbon growth by 2020, a coalition of aviation stakeholders has adopted emission reduction targets.

Airports are also seeking to become energy independent, and using renewable resources as a strategy to get there. Further, as the costs for conventional energy sources increases, renewable resources become more financially attractive. Those airports who have implemented renewable resources have been able to do so at minimal cost.

While a business case can be made for the integration of any one particular renewable resource, an airport can be more strategic by adopting an overall renewable resource strategy. The renewable resources strategy can then become an input to other airport planning documents (e.g., airport master plan, strategic plan). The success of developing the plan as well as implementation require all internal and external stakeholders are involved in the process.

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