National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 3 Selection and Outreach
Suggested Citation:"Biography." National Research Council. 2000. Future Biotechnology Research on the International Space Station. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9785.
×

Bibliography

Ansari, R., S. Kwang, A. Arabashi, W. Wilson, T. Bray, and L. DeLucas. 1997. A Fiber Optic Probe for Monitoring Protein Aggregation, Nucleation and Crystallization, J. Cryst. Growth 168: 216-235.

Arndt, U.W. 1990. Focusing optics for laboratory sources in X-ray crystallography, J. Appl. Cryst. 23: 161-168.

Arndt, U.W., P. Duncumb, J.V.P. Long, L. Pina, and A. Inneman. 1998a. Focusing Mirrors for Use with Microfocus X-ray Tubes, J. Appl. Cryst. 31: 733-741.

Arndt, U.W., J.V.P. Long, and P. Duncumb. 1998b. A Microfocus X-ray Tube Used with Focusing Collimators, J. Appl. Cryst. 31: 936-944.

Brown, D.D., U.W. Goodenough, S.C. Harrison, A.P. Mahowald, E.M. Meyerowitz, C.R. Somerville, and A.L. Staehelin. 1998. Report on NASA Life Sciences Research to the American Society of Cell Biology Council. Available at <http://www.ascb.org/ascb/pubpol/ nasareport.html>.

Carter, D.C., B. Wright, T. Miller, J. Chapman, P. Twigg, K. Keeling, K. Moody, M. White, J. Click, J.R. Ruble, J.X. Ho, L. Adcock-Downey, G. Bunick, and J. Harp. 1999a. Diffusion-controlled crystallization apparatus for microgravity (DCAM): flight and ground-based applications, J. Cryst. Growth 196: 602-609.

Carter, D.C., B. Wright, T. Miller, J. Chapman, P. Twigg, K. Keeling, K. Moody, M. White, J. Click, J.R. Ruble, J.X. Ho, L. Adcock-Downey, T. Dowling, C.H. Chang, P. Ala, J. Rose, B.C. Wang, J.P. Declercq, C. Evrard, J. Rosenberg, J.P. Wery, D. Clawson, M. Wardell, W. Stallings, and A. Stevens. 1999b. PCAM: A multi-user facility-based protein crystallization apparatus for microgravity, J. Cryst. Growth 196: 610-622.

Chayen, Naomi E., and John R. Helliwell. 1999. Space-grown crystals may prove their worth, Nature 398: 20.

Cogoli, A., and M. Cogoli-Greuter. 1997. Activation of lymphocytes and other mammalian cells in microgravity , Adv. Space Biol. Med. 6: 33-79.

Day, J., and A. McPherson. 1992. Macromolecular crystal growth experiments on International Microgravity Laboratory, Protein Sci.1: 1254-1268.

DeLucas, L., C.D. Smith, H.W. Smith, S. Vijay-Kumar, S.E. Senadhi, S.E. Ealick, D. Carter, and A. McPherson. 1989. Protein crystal growth in microgravity, Science 246: 651-654.

Dickson, K.J. 1991. Summary of biological spaceflight experiments with cells, ASGSB Bull. 4: 151-260.

Dobrianov, I., C. Caylor, S.G. Lemay, K.D. Finkelstein, and R.E. Thorne. 1999. X-ray diffraction studies of protein crystal disorder, J. Cryst. Growth 196: 511.

Dobrianov, I., K.D. Finkelstein, S.G. Lemay, and R.E. Thorne. 1998. X-ray topographic studies of protein crystal perfection and growth , Acta Crystallogr. D54: 922.

Freed, L.E., Robert Langer, Ivan Martin, Neal R. Pellis, and Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic. 1997. Tissue engineering of cartilage in space, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94: 13885-13890.

Geierstanger, B.H., M. Mrksich, P.B. Dervan, and D.E. Wemmer. 1996. Extending the recognition site of designed minor groove binding molecules , Nature Structural Biology 3: 321-324.

Gilliland, G.L., M. Tung, D.M. Blakeslee, and J.E. Ladner. 1994. The biological macromolecule crystallization database, version 3.0: new features, data, and the NASA archive for protein crystal growth data, Acta Crystallogr. D50: 408-413. See also <http://www.rcsb.org/ pdb/>.

Hammond, T.G., F.C. Lewis, T.J. Goodwin, R.M. Linnehan, D.A. Wolf, K.P. Hire, W.C. Campbell, E. Benes, K.C. O'Reilly, R.K. Globus, and J.H. Kaysen. 1999. Gene expression in space, Nature Medicine 5: 359.

Henry, Celia M. 1999. The incredible shrinking mass spectrometers, Anal. Chem. 71: 264A-268A.

Suggested Citation:"Biography." National Research Council. 2000. Future Biotechnology Research on the International Space Station. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9785.
×

Kao, S., H. McDonald, and W. Wilson. 1998. Usefulness of virial coefficients in protein crystal growth, presented at the 7th International Conference on the Crystallization of Biological Macromolecules, Granada, Spain.

Kaysen, J.H., W.C. Campbell, R.R. Majewski, F.O. Goda, G.L. Navar, F.C. Lewis, T.J. Goodwin, and T.G. Hammond. 1999. Select de novo gene and protein expression during renal epithelial cell culture in rotating wall vessels is shear stress dependent, J. Membr. Biol. 168: 77-89.

Köhler, S., C.F. Delwiche, P.W. Denny, L.G. Tilney, P. Webster, R.J.M. Wilson, J.D. Palmer, and D.S. Roos. 1997. A plastid of probable green algal origin in apicomplexan parasites , Science 275: 1485-1488.

Koszelak, S., J. Day, C. Leja, R. Cudney, and A. McPherson. 1995. Protein and virus crystal growth on international microgravity laboratory , Biophys. J. 69: 13-19.

Lewis, Marian L., and Millie Hughes-Fulford. 1997. Cellular responses to spaceflight, pp. 21-39 in Fundamentals of Space Life Sciences, Vol. 1, Susanne E. Churchill (ed.). Malabar, Florida: Krieger Publishing Company.

Malakoff, David. 1999. A $100 billion orbiting lab takes shape. What will it do? Science 2 84: 1102-1108.

McPherson, A., A.J. Malkin, Y.G. Kuznetsov, S. Koszelak, M. Wells, G. Jenkins, J. Howard, and G. Lawson. 1999. The effects of microgravity on protein crystallization: Evidence for concentration gradients around growing crystals, J. Cryst. Growth 196: 572-586.

Moore, D., and A. Cogoli. 1996. Gravitational and space biology at the cellular level, pp. 1-106 in Biological and Medical Research in Space, D. Moore, P. Bie, and H. Oser (eds.). New York: Springer.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). 1995. NASA, NIH sign agreement on biomedical research, Space Technology Innovation 3: 5.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise. 1997. Microgravity Biotechnology: Research and Flight Experiment Opportunities , NRA-97-HEDS-02. Washington, D.C.: NASA.

National Research Council (NRC). 1995. Microgravity Research Opportunities for the 1990s. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

National Research Council (NRC). 1997. Future Materials Science Research on the International Space Station . Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

National Research Council (NRC). 1998. A Strategy for Research in Space Biology and Medicine in the New Century. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

National Research Council (NRC). 1999. Institutional Arrangements for Space Station Research. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

Reichhardt, T. 1998. Biologists recommend scrapping NASA's research on crystals, Nature 394: 213.

Searby, Nancy D., Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, and Javier de Luis. 1998. Design and development of a space station cell culture unit, presented at the Session on Environmental Considerations in Microgravity Flight Implementation II at the International Conference on Environmental Systems, Danvers, Mass.

Smith, G.D., E. Ciszak, and W. Pangborn. 1996. A novel complex of a phenolic derivative with insulin: Structural features related to the T->R transition, Protein Sci. 5: 1502-1511.

Snell, E.H., S. Weisgerber, J.R. Helliwell, E. Weckert, K. Holzer, and K. Schroer. 1995. Improvements in lysozyme protein crystal perfection through microgravity growth, Acta Crystallogr. D51: 1099-1102.

Unsworth, Brian R., and Peter I. Lelkes. 1998. Growing tissues in microgravity, Nature Medicine 4: 901-907.

Volkman, B.F., M.J. Nohaile, N.K. Amy, S. Kustu, and D.E. Wemmer. 1995. Three-dimensional solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of NtrC, Biochemistry 34: 1413-1424.

Suggested Citation:"Biography." National Research Council. 2000. Future Biotechnology Research on the International Space Station. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9785.
×
This page in the original is blank.
Suggested Citation:"Biography." National Research Council. 2000. Future Biotechnology Research on the International Space Station. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9785.
×
Page48
Suggested Citation:"Biography." National Research Council. 2000. Future Biotechnology Research on the International Space Station. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9785.
×
Page49
Suggested Citation:"Biography." National Research Council. 2000. Future Biotechnology Research on the International Space Station. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9785.
×
Page50
Next: Appendix A: Hardware Available or in Development and Schedule for Biotechnology Research on the International Space Station »
Future Biotechnology Research on the International Space Station Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $47.00 Buy Ebook | $37.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Under current NASA plans, investigations in the area of biotechnology will be a significant component of the life sciences research to be conducted on the International Space Station (ISS). They encompass work on cell science and studies of the use of microgravity to grow high-quality protein crystals. Both these subdisciplines are advancing rapidly in terrestrial laboratories, fueled by federal and industrial research budgets that dwarf those of NASA's life science program. Forging strong and fruitful connections between the space investigations and laboratory-bench biologists, a continual challenge for NASA' s life sciences program, is thus of great importance to ensuring the excellence of ISS research.

This report evaluates the plan for NASA's biotechnology facility on the ISS and the scientific context that surrounds it, and makes recommendations on how the facility can be made more effective. In addition to questions about optimizing the instrumentation, the report addresses strategies for enhancing the scientific impact and improving the outreach to mainstream terrestrial biology. No major redirection of effort is called for, but collectively the specific, targeted changes recommended by the task group would have a major effect on the conduct of biotechnology research in space.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!