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Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards (2022)

Chapter: Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
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Appendix D

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Jonathan Samet, M.D., M.S. (Chair), a pulmonary physician and epidemiologist, is the dean of the Colorado School of Public Health. Previously, he was the distinguished professor and the Flora L. Thornton Chair for the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. Dr. Samet’s research has focused on the health risks of inhaled pollutants in outdoor air and also indoor pollutants, including secondhand smoke and radon. He has also investigated the occurrence and causes of cancer and respiratory diseases, emphasizing the risks of active and passive smoking. Dr. Samet has served on and chaired numerous committees of the National Research Council and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including chairing the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. For several decades, he has been involved in global health, focusing on tobacco control, air pollution, and chronic disease prevention. Dr. Samet has been the chair of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee of the Food and Drug Administration. He has served as an editor and the author for reports of the Surgeon General on smoking and health since 1984, receiving the Surgeon General’s Medallion in 1990 and 2006 for these contributions. Dr. Samet received the 2004 Prince Mahidol Award for Global Health awarded by the King of Thailand, the Edward Livingston Trudeau Medal from the American Thoracic Society/American Lung Association, the Luther Terry Award for Distinguished Career from the American Cancer Society, and the Fries

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
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Prize for Health. He was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 1997 and received the David Rall Medal in 2015.

Gloria Addo-Ayensu, M.D., M.P.H., is the director of health for Fairfax County, Virginia. In this capacity she provides overall leadership and direction for public health programs in the county and serves as the official health advisor to the Fairfax Board of Supervisors, the Health Care Advisory Board, and the Human Services Council. Dr. Addo-Ayensu is a visionary leader with a passion for promoting community resiliency and creating innovative, practical, and sustainable community-based approaches to public health challenges. She has led a number of regional and state public health initiatives in the areas of health literacy, emergency preparedness, obesity prevention, and health equity. She has served on a number of national committees, including the Public Health Preparedness Essential Services Committee of the National Association of County and City Health Officials and two Institute of Medicine committees on personal protective equipment for health care workers to prevent the transmission of pandemic influenza or other viral respiratory infections. In 2016, Dr. Addo-Ayensu received the A. Heath Onthank Memorial Award, the highest honor the county bestows on its employees.

Wändi Bruine de Bruin, Ph.D., is a provost professor of public policy, psychology, and behavioral science at the University of Southern California (USC), where she leads the initiative on Behavioral Science and Well-Being Policy and is affiliated with the Price School of Public Policy, the Dornsife School’s Department of Psychology, the Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics, the Center for Economic and Social Research, the Center for Sustainability Solutions, and the Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events. She previously served on the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University’s Department of Engineering and Public Policy and the Leeds University Business School (United Kingdom), and still holds affiliations with each. She holds a Ph.D. in behavioral decision research and psychology from Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Bruine de Bruin’s research is focused on understanding and informing how people make decisions about their health, well-being, and environmental impacts; she also studies age differences in decision-making competence. She has published more than 120 peer-reviewed papers on these topics in journals targeting psychology, public policy, health, and environmental science. Dr. Bruine de Bruin is a fellow of the Psychonomic Society; the United Kingdom’s Academy of Social Sciences; and the Network for Studies on Pensions, Aging and Retirement (NETSPAR). She is a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, the Journal of Behavioral Decision Making, Decision, Medical Decision Making, the Journal of Risk Research,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
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and Psychology and Aging. Dr. Bruine de Bruin is co-leading a national USC survey that is tracking people’s risk perceptions and experiences associated with COVID-19. She has previously served on expert panels for the National Academy of Sciences on communicating science effectively and for the Council of the Canadian Academies on Health Product Risk Communication.

Sarah Coefield, M.S., M.A., is an air quality specialist with the Missoula City-County Health Department. As a public health practitioner, she works to prepare the public for air pollution events through studies, communication, planning, and direct interventions. Ms. Coefield has lectured on the topic of wildfire smoke-ready communities at multiple conferences, workshops, and webinars in the United States and Canada, including a 2018 International Association of Wildland Fire conference, a 2018 Northwest Center for Public Health Practice Hot Topics in Practice webinar, the 2019 Health Effects Institute Annual Conference, a 2019 American Thoracic Society workshop, a 2019 Air & Waste Management Association conference, and a 2019 British Columbia Lung Association conference. Ms. Coefield has been part of the Air Quality Program at the Missoula Health Department since 2010, where she leads initiatives on smoke management, wildfire smoke response, and oxygenated fuels, and works on such projects as the PM10 Redesignation Request and the Carbon Monoxide Limited Maintenance Plan.

Howard J. Cohen, Ph.D., M.P.H., CIH, consults in areas of occupational exposure assessment and respiratory protection. He retired as a professor emeritus at the University of New Haven, where he chaired the Occupational Safety and Health Management program. Dr. Cohen has served as an adjunct professor and an instructor at Yale University’s Schools of Public Health and Medicine, and as an adjunct professor of chemical engineering at the University of Rhode Island. He received his B.A. from Boston University and earned both his Ph.D. in industrial hygiene and his M.P.H. at the University of Michigan. He is board certified in the comprehensive practice of industrial hygiene by the American Board of Industrial Hygiene (ABIH). Prior to joining the University of New Haven faculty in 1994, Dr. Cohen spent 16 years as an industrial hygienist at Olin Corporation, where he last served as its corporate manager. He was the editor-in-chief of the American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal from 1991 to 2003, and then served as a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene until 2017. He previously served as the chair of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z88.2 Committee on Respiratory Protection and the chair of the American Industrial Hygiene Association Committee on Respiratory Protection. He also has served as the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

treasurer of ABIH. Dr. Cohen has received numerous professional awards, including the 1989 Warren A. Cook Award; the 1990, 1992, and 2002 John M. White Award for excellence in respiratory protection; the 2003 Alfred Kammer award; the 2007 Donald Cummings Award; and the 2011 Henry Smyth Jr. Award. His published writings address occupational exposure assessment, the characterization of specific airborne particulates, and the performance of respiratory protective devices. In August 2021, Dr. Cohen joined StoneTurn Consultants and, with 9 other subject-matter experts, is providing expertise to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory under a competitively awarded contract titled: “Transitioning PPE Conformity Assessment Practices to Align with the National Framework for Conformity Assessment.”

Joseph Domitrovich, Ph.D., is a wildland firefighter and an exercise physiologist for the United States Forest Service’s (USFS’s) National Technology and Development Program (NTDP) based in Missoula, Montana. He started with USFS in 2007. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Montana, Missoula, in interdisciplinary studies with an emphasis in exercise physiology. He received his master’s degree at the University of Montana, and his bachelor’s degree at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo in California. Dr. Domitrovich’s work at NTDP includes hydration, nutrition, health effects of smoke, heat-related illnesses, stress, and fitness. Dr. Domitrovich is an advisor to the Risk Management Committee of the National Wildfire Coordinating Group and the Fire Risk Management Council of USFS. He is the USFS representative to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) Committee on Respiratory Protection and the task group chair for the NFPA 1984 Standard on Wildland and Urban Interface Respiratory Protection. Dr. Domitrovich also teaches wildland fire training courses at the local and national level.

Karen Emmons, Ph.D., is a professor of social and behavioral science at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She is a behavioral scientist with a strong track record of funded research in community-based approaches to cancer prevention in a variety of settings that serve under-resourced communities, including low-income housing and community health centers. Dr. Emmons’s work targets a range of cancer risk factors, including nutrition, physical activity, sun exposure, tobacco and secondhand smoke exposure, and cancer screening. Her research teams have included interdisciplinary perspectives on cancer risk reduction and health disparities, with a focus on multiple cancer risk behaviors. Dr. Emmons has a strong track record as a mentor, and is a past recipient of a mid-career K award focused on dissemination and implementation research to reduce cancer disparities.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

Her current work and writing focus heavily on implementation science, particularly in community health settings, and she has been actively involved in national efforts to develop implementation research and training programs. She currently serves as the faculty director of the Community Engagement Program for Harvard’s Clinical Translational Science Award. Dr. Emmons is the past president of the Society of Behavioral Medicine and a member of the National Academy of Medicine.

Shawn Gibbs, Ph.D., M.B.A., CIH, joined Texas A&M University on May 1, 2020, as the dean of the School of Public Health. Dr. Gibbs is an industrial hygienist with expertise in the disruption of highly infectious diseases, such as COVID-19 and Ebola virus disease. His research has helped determine national policies, procedures, and best practices for responders and health care workers to safely treat patients with highly infectious diseases. Dr. Gibbs lends guidance to national and international organizations, serving on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Board of Scientific Counselors Homeland Security Subcommittee, and working with the Department of State and the U.S. Air Force Air Mobility Command. He obtained a B.S. in biology at The Ohio State University. While working as a contractor for EPA, he attended the University of Cincinnati where he was awarded an M.S. in environmental engineering and a Ph.D. in environmental science. While serving as the associate dean at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) he completed his M.B.A. in agribusiness from the University of Nebraska. His first tenure track position was with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston at its El Paso regional campus, where he was the co-director of two cores of the Hispanic Health Disparities Research Center. He also served as the director of master’s programs and then the associate dean of student affairs at the College of Public Health at UNMC. There he worked with the Nebraska Biocontainment Unit as the director of research. Its team designed quarantine, isolation, personal protective equipment (PPE), other policies and procedures, and provided international training and evaluation to first responders, including the military, and others who have direct or indirect patient contact. It performed decontamination research to assist with shortages in PPE. Dr. Gibbs and the Nebraska Biocontainment Unit served the U.S. Ebola response, including treating patients with Ebola virus disease. Dr. Gibbs then served at Indiana University as the executive associate dean of the School of Public Health. While at Indiana University, he also held several interim roles, including the associate dean for research. He developed a National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) training grant that resulted in the Biosafety and Infectious Disease Training Initiative, a partnership with several nationally recognized organizations, including The University of Texas School of Public Health,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

to deliver national trainings on infectious disease. This merged into a continuing partnership with the UTHealth-led Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (P2R) Consortium, a NIEHS-funded Worker Training Program, a relationship that has continued through his return to Texas. In his current role as the dean of Texas A&M’s School of Public Health, his focus is on transforming health through interdisciplinary inquiry, innovative solutions, and development of leaders through the Aggie tradition of service to engage diverse communities worldwide. Dr. Gibbs and the Texas A&M School of Public Health have served the university, county, state and country through the response to COVID-19.

Ayse P. Gurses, Ph.D., M.S., M.P.H., is a professor in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Whiting School of Engineering. She is the founding director of the Armstrong Institute Center for Health Care Human Factors. Dr. Gurses is an industrial and systems engineer (with sub-specialization in human factors engineering), an implementation scientist, and a health services researcher. Her current research efforts focus on improving patient safety (medication safety, diagnostic safety, care transitions/handoffs in pediatric trauma, preventing health care acquired infections), health care worker safety (protecting health care workers from communicable diseases through engineering-based solutions, workload management, reducing clinician stress and burnout), and patient- and family-centeredness of care (improving communication and partnership with patients in primary care for safe medication management). Dr. Gurses earned her Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and completed her postdoctoral training at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Before joining Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Gurses served as a faculty member at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and the University of Minnesota. She is a member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, where she was the chair of the Health Care Technical Group, and she serves as the scientific editor of Applied Ergonomics, a top-level journal in the field of human factors engineering. Dr. Gurses’s work has been recognized with numerous awards, including, most recently, a Best Paper Award from the International Ergonomics Association and Liberty Mutual for research examining patient safety in the cardiovascular operating room, and an Early Career Investigator Award from the Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences Foundation.

Robert Harrison, M.D., M.P.H., is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), having joined the faculty in 1984. He founded and, for more than 15 years, has directed UCSF’s Occupational Health Services, and now is a senior attending physician.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

Dr. Harrison has diagnosed and treated thousands of patients with work- and environment-induced diseases and injuries. He also directs the worker tracking investigation program for the California Department of Public Health. Dr. Harrison received his B.A. from the University of Rochester and his M.D. from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He is board certified in both internal medicine and occupational medicine. He has served on the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standards Board. In addition, Dr. Harrison has authored numerous publications in the area of occupational medicine.

Stephanie Holm, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., is the co-director of the Western States Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit and a public health medical officer at the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment of the California Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Holm received her M.D. in 2011 from the University of Pittsburgh. She is board certified in both pediatrics and occupational/environmental medicine (trained at Children’s Hospital and Research Center Oakland and University of California, San Francisco, respectively). She also completed 1 year of pediatric pulmonary training at Oakland before leaving to further pursue her interests in pediatric research and pediatric environmental medicine. Dr. Holm was the principal investigator on the Tobacco in the Home Environment and Air Quality Undermining Asthma Study, a dual cohort study of asthmatic children with and without cigarette exposure, which measured particulate matter levels in children’s home environments in order to correlate these with features and behaviors of the household and its occupants. As part of her work with the Region 9 Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU), she has reviewed literature relevant to the health effects of wildfire smoke and potential public health responses, including literature on the use of masks and respirators by the general public. Also at PEHSU, Dr. Holm has co-authored multiple fact sheets and infographics mentioning masks and respirators in the setting of wildfire smoke, which are based on her published work in the peer-reviewed literature. Dr. Holm completed an M.P.H. and a Ph.D. in epidemiology at the University of California, Berkeley.

Sundaresan Jayaraman, Ph.D., is a professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he is also the founding director of the Kolon Center for Lifestyle Innovation. A pioneer in bringing about convergence between textiles and computing, Dr. Jayaraman’s research has led to the paradigm of “Fabric Is the Computer.” He is a leader in studying and defining the roles of engineering design, manufacturing, and materials technologies in public policy for the nation. Dr. Jayaraman has made significant contributions in the following

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

areas: (1) smart textile-based wearable systems; (2) computer-aided manufacturing, automation, and enterprise architecture modeling; (3) engineering design and analysis of intelligent textile structures and processes; and (4) the design and development of knowledge based systems (KBS) for textiles and apparel. Dr. Jayaraman received the 1989 Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for his research in the area of computer-aided manufacturing and enterprise architecture. In September 1994, he was elected a fellow of the Textile Institute in the United Kingdom. His publications include a textbook on computer-aided problem solving and 10 U.S. patents. Dr. Jayaraman has received more than $16 million in research funding from such sources as NSF, the Department of Defense and its Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and industry. He served as the technical editor, information technology, for ATI Magazine (now Textile World) from 1995 to 2003. From May 2000 to October 2004, he was an editor of the Journal of the Textile Institute and is currently on the editorial advisory board. Dr. Jayaraman is a founding member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health and has served on seven consensus study committees. From December 2008 to February 2011, he also served on the National Academies’ Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design, and in February 2011, he became a founding member of the National Materials and Manufacturing Board. Dr. Jayaraman is also a founding member of the IEEE Technical Committee on Biomedical Wearable Systems (2004–2008). In October 2000, he received the Georgia Technology Research Leader Award from the State of Georgia.

James S. Johnson, Ph.D., CIH, QEP, is a certified industrial hygienist and a qualified environmental professional who has operated JSJ and Associates, a small consulting firm specializing in occupational safety and health and hazardous material issues, since 1978. Many of the firm’s projects have involved personal protective equipment (PPE) and firefighter respiratory protective equipment. Dr. Johnson worked at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from 1972 through 2006. From November 2000 to 2006 he served as the section leader of the Chemical and Biological Safety Section of the Safety Programs Division. Throughout his career at LLNL, Dr. Johnson was involved with respiratory protection and PPE as a respiratory program administrator, research scientist, and division and section manager. He is a fellow of the American Industrial Hygiene Association, a past member of the Technical Correlating Committee on Fire and Emergency Services Protective Clothing and Equipment of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), a past member of the NFPA Respiratory

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

Protection Equipment Committee, a past chair of the International Society for Respiratory Protection (ISRP), a past chair of the ISRP Americas Section, and a past editor of ISRP Journal. Currently, Dr. Johnson is the chair of the ASTM Subcommittee F23.65 on respiratory protection. The recent relocation of the ANSI Z88 Secretariat from the American Society of Safety Professionals (ASSP) to ASTM has expanded the visibility and participation in respiratory standards development. New work items initiated to support the COVID-19 pandemic will address facial covering performance, emergency responder elastomeric respirator performance, and elastomeric respirator decontamination test methods. Dr. Johnson also continues to provide his expertise on respiratory program improvements, Hanford Tank Farm, use of toxic materials, beryllium, as well as providing expert witness consultation on respiratory protection. He has co-authored a number of articles and authored several chapters on respiratory protection in the past several years. In August 2021, Dr. Johnson joined StoneTurn Consultants and, with nine other subject-matter experts, is providing expertise to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory under a competitively awarded contract titled: “Transitioning PPE Conformity Assessment Practices to Align with the National Framework for Conformity Assessment.”

Bruce Lippy, Ph.D., CIH, CSP, FAIHA, is the director of nanomaterials research at CPWR (The Center for Construction Research and Training) and the president of The Lippy Group, LLC. Dr. Lippy started his career in industrial hygiene in 1978, working with Maryland Occupational Safety and Health. He has a Ph.D. in policy from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He is a certified industrial hygienist and a certified safety professional and was recently designated a fellow of the American Industrial Hygiene Association. As an associate at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Dr. Lippy teaches a graduate course on occupational injury prevention. He is a member of the National Response Team and has supported the protection of responders during the attacks of September 11, 2001; the anthrax attacks; Hurricane Katrina; and the Gulf oil spill. Dr. Lippy has recently performed safety culture audits for large construction projects, including the first nuclear power unit to be built in the United States in decades. He served on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Committee on the Use of Elastomeric Respirators in Health Care. Dr. Lippy continues to advise management about proper respiratory protection for the workers at the Department of Energy’s chemical waste storage facilities in Hanford, Washington. In August 2021, Dr. Lippy joined StoneTurn Consultants and, with nine other subject-matter experts, is providing expertise to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s National Personal Protective Technology

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

Laboratory under a competitively awarded contract titled: “Transitioning PPE Conformity Assessment Practices to Align with the National Framework for Conformity Assessment.”

David Michaels, Ph.D., M.P.H., is an epidemiologist and a professor of environmental and occupational health at the Milken Institute School of Public Health of The George Washington University. He served as the assistant secretary of labor for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration from 2009 to 2017, the longest-serving in the agency’s history. From 1998 to 2001, Dr. Michaels was the assistant secretary of energy for environment, safety, and health, charged with protecting the workers, community residents, and environment in and around the nation’s nuclear weapons facilities. In that position, he was the chief architect of the historic initiative to compensate nuclear weapons workers who were sickened by radiation, beryllium, and other toxic exposures. Much of Dr. Michaels’s work has focused on protecting the integrity of the science underpinning public health, safety, and environmental protections. On this topic, he is the author of Doubt Is Their Product: How Industry’s Assault on Science Threatens Your Health (Oxford University Press, 2008) and The Triumph of Doubt: Dark Money and the Science of Deception (Oxford University Press, 2020). Dr. Michaels received the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award; the American Public Health Association’s David P. Rall Award for Advocacy in Public Health; and the John P. McGovern Science and Society Award given by Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society. He is a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Toxicology Program. He received his Ph.D. and M.P.H. from Columbia University and his B.A. from the City College of New York.

Mary Rice, M.D., M.P.H., is an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, where her research focuses on preventable causes of chronic lung disease in children and adults, including such environmental exposures as air pollution, weather, allergens, and microbes, as well as behavioral and nutritional risk factors. Dr. Rice directs the Institute for Lung Health at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), a clinical and translational research program in respiratory disease that applies advanced statistical and sampling methodologies, and leverages BIDMC clinical programs in chronic lung disease and multiple U.S.-based prospective cohort studies of children and adults. Her research is funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). In 2020, Dr. Rice received an Outstanding New Environmental Scientist award from NIEHS to study the effect of home air purification for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. She received the Jo Rae Wright award for outstanding

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

science (2020) and the David Bates award (2016), both from the American Thoracic Society (ATS), for her contributions to the field of environmental, occupational, and population health. She was the vice chair (2015–2018) and is now the chair (2018–present) of the ATS Environmental Health Policy Committee, and is an active member of several ATS assembly committees. Dr. Rice is the co-editor of the section on environmental science and health of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

Kevin Riley, Ph.D., M.P.H., is the director of research and evaluation of the Labor Occupational Safety and Health (LOSH) Program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), which collaborates with workers, unions, community organizations, employers, academics, students, governmental representatives, and health professionals to improve health and safety conditions for workers in Southern California. Initiatives include health and safety training; education for low-income, minority, and immigrant workers; public advocacy; and participation in industry-wide research relating to policy issues in California. Dr. Riley serves as the principal investigator of the Western Region Universities Consortium (WRUC), a partnership of four university-based hazmat training programs funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Worker Training Program and supporting hazmat-related worker training initiatives throughout Environmental Protection Agency Regions IX and X. He has led WRUC’s training initiatives for health care workers on aerosol transmissible disease hazards and California’s Aerosol Transmissible Diseases Standard—most recently with an emphasis on protections from SARS-CoV-2. Dr. Riley has also overseen training efforts for workers exposed to smoke and atmospheric particulate matter during wildfire events. Other areas of research have included heat illness among outdoor workers, occupational injuries and workers’ compensation eligibility for residential day laborers and domestic workers, long work hours among long-haul truck drivers and live-in caregivers, and evaluation of various worker training initiatives. Dr. Riley received his Ph.D. in sociology from UCLA and his M.P.H. from the UCLA School of Public Health. He is an active member of the Occupational Health Section of the American Public Health Association.

Daniel K. Shipp is the past president of the International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA), the association for manufacturers and distributors of personal protective equipment and clothing, from 1993 until his retirement in 2017. As the chief staff officer of ISEA, Mr. Shipp represented U.S. safety equipment manufacturers before Congress and U.S. regulatory agencies, as well as global industry and government forums. He has served as a member of the Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

Medicine; the Board of the Americas Section of the International Society for Respiratory Protection; the Board of Directors of the National Safety Council; and the PPE Conformity Assessment Working Group of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health’s (NIOSH’s) National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory (NPPTL). Mr. Shipp was a member of the planning committee for the National Academies August 2020 workshop on current issues in assessment of respiratory protective devices. In August 2021, Dr. Lippy joined StoneTurn Consultants and, with nine other subject-matter experts, is providing expertise to NIOSH’s NPPTL under a competitively awarded contract titled: “Transitioning PPE Conformity Assessment Practices to Align with the National Framework for Conformity Assessment.”

Rosemary K. Sokas, M.D., M.O.H., M.Sc., is a professor of human science at the Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies and a professor of family medicine at the Georgetown School of Medicine. An internist with more than 30 years of experience in the field of occupational and environmental medicine and public health, she has provided primary care in safety net health centers in Las Marias, Puerto Rico, and Bronx, New York. Subsequently, Dr. Sokas specialized in occupational health and public health, serving as the director of the Office of Occupational Medicine at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and as the associate director for science at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. She has held academic positions at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Studies, and the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) School of Public Health. At UIC, Dr. Sokas conducted participatory action research and led educational programs engaging workers; community members; and practitioners and students in medicine, public health, nursing, and community peer education. Her research and career are focused on occupational and environmental health for high-risk, low-wage, vulnerable populations. Dr. Sokas’s publications address the role primary care providers play in addressing the prevention needs of underserved working populations, and etiologic and intervention studies targeting hazards faced by construction workers, health care workers, and immigrant day labor and home care workers, including the impact of contingent work and the need for supply chain and other policy interventions. Her interests include transdisciplinary collaboration and mixed-method approaches to addressing social justice concerns in the workplace and in the community.

John Volckens, Ph.D., is a professor of mechanical engineering and the director of the Center for Energy Development and Health at Colorado State University (CSU). He holds affiliate appointments in environmental

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

health, biomedical engineering, the Colorado School of Public Health, and the CSU Energy Institute. His research interests involve air quality, low-cost sensors, exposure science, and air pollution–related disease. His laboratory is currently testing respirators and other respiratory protective devices for effectiveness against COVID-19. Dr. Volckens is a founding member of the CSU Partnership for Air Quality, Climate, and Health—an organization that seeks to develop practical, science-vetted solutions to intertwined societal problems of air quality, climate, and health. He holds a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Vermont and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He then went on to a postdoctoral position at the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) National Exposure Research Laboratory in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. At CSU, he has pioneered the development of several new pollution sensor technologies, which have been deployed for public health research in more than 30 countries and on the International Space Station. Dr. Volckens is the co-founder of Access Sensor Technologies, LLC, a company started through his research collaborations at CSU. He has published more than 100 manuscripts related to exposure science, aerosol technology, and air pollution–related disease, and has been the principal investigator for more than $20 million in funded research from EPA, the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

NATIONAL ACADEMIES STAFF

Autumn S. Downey, Ph.D. (Study Director), is a senior program officer with the Board on Health Sciences Policy. She joined the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in 2012 and, in addition to the current study, she directs the Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. She was formerly the director of the Standing Committee on Medical and Epidemiological Aspects of Air Pollution on U.S. Government Employees and Their Families. Other National Academies studies she has worked on include Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers; Evidence-Based Practice for Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response; Return of Individual-Specific Research Results Generated in Research Laboratories; Preventing Cognitive Decline and Dementia; A National Trauma Care System; Healthy, Resilient, and Sustainable Communities After Disasters; BioWatch PCR Assays; and Advancing Workforce Health at the Department of Homeland Security. Dr. Downey received her Ph.D. in molecular microbiology and immunology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she also completed a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

postdoctoral fellowship at the school’s National Center for the Study of Preparedness and Catastrophic Event Response. Prior to joining the National Academies, she was a National Research Council postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, where she worked on environmental sampling for biothreat agents and the indoor microbiome.

Olivia C. Yost, M.Sc., is a program officer with the Board on Health Sciences Policy. She has supported multiple consensus study and workshop committees related to the topics of respiratory protection, preparedness, and occupational health—most recently, the Committee on Best Practices for Assessing Mortality and Significant Morbidity Following Large-Scale Disasters, the Committee on Current Issues in the Assessment of Respiratory Protective Devices, and the Committee on the Use of Elastomeric Respirators in Health Care. Prior to joining the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in 2015, Ms. Yost worked as a research officer for ARCHIVE Global, where she managed evaluation activities for disease control programs in the Caribbean, West Africa, and South Asia. Ms. Yost received her M.Sc. in the control of infectious diseases from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, where her graduate research focused on developing rapid testing methodologies to identify failing wastewater infrastructure. She received her B.A. in history and communications from Franklin University Switzerland.

Aurelia Attal-Juncqua, M.Sc., is an associate program officer on the Board on Health Sciences Policy where she currently supports the Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies. Prior to joining the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, she worked for more than 3 years as a senior research associate at the Center for Global Health Science and Security at Georgetown University. Previously, Ms. Attal-Juncqua also briefly worked as a business analyst in the health care and pharmaceutical industry in London and as a research intern for the World Health Organization in Geneva. In addition to her role at the National Academies, Ms. Attal-Juncqua is a part-time doctoral student in health security at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She received a B.Sc. with honors in biology and microbiology from Imperial College in London and an M.Sc. in control of infectious diseases from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Her main professional interests include biosecurity, capacity building for prevention and control of infectious diseases, and public health emergency preparedness and response.

Michael Berrios is a research associate currently working with the Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies and the Committee on Respiratory Protection for the Public and Workers

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

Without Respiratory Protection Programs at Their Workplaces. He has worked on numerous studies during his 6 years at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He received a master’s degree in Asian studies from The George Washington University.

Claire Giammaria, M.P.H., is a former associate program officer with the Board on Health Sciences Policy for the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She previously worked on the study on Assessment of Strategies for Managing Cancer Risks Associated with Radiation Exposure During Crewed Space Missions, the study on Respiratory Protection for the Public and Workers Without Respiratory Protection Programs at Their Workplaces, and the Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences Research in Space 2023–2032. Ms. Giammaria also helped to staff the Standing Committee on Medical and Epidemiological Aspects of Air Pollution on U.S. Government Employees and Their Families and the Standing Committees on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. Prior to coming to the National Academies, Ms. Giammaria was a research associate for the Technology and Liberty Project at the American Civil Liberties Union, where she primarily worked on genetics, health care, and privacy issues. She has an M.P.H. from the University of Michigan, where she studied public health policy and concentrated in public health genetics. Ms. Giammaria received her B.A. from Grinnell College where she majored in biology.

Lydia Teferra is a research assistant with the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, serving as a staff member with the Roundtable on Genomics and Precision Health and the Forum on Regenerative Medicine. She graduated from Northwestern University in 2020 with a B.A. in psychology and global health, and has been working at the National Academies for more than 1 year. Prior to her time at the National Academies, Ms. Teferra interned and volunteered for local nonprofit organizations addressing a number of public health issues. She hopes to pursue a master’s degree in public health in the near future.

Scott Wollek, M.P.A., is a senior program officer with the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, where he serves as the director of the Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies. In his time at the National Academies, he has worked on a variety of projects focused on medical countermeasures, civilian biodefense, workforce resilience, health care capacity building, and other health security topics. Prior to joining the National Academies, Mr. Wollek served as the senior disaster program

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×

manager at the American Red Cross in the National Capital Region (NCR). In that role, he was responsible for the management of preparedness, response, and recovery programs throughout the NCR, including response to more than 500 local disasters each year. During his 11 years with the Red Cross, Mr. Wollek held a variety of paid and volunteer staff positions involving local disaster response, training, exercises, plans, and operations. He served in leadership positions during disasters and special events including the 2009 and 2013 presidential inaugurations; the 2010 blizzard; and the NCR response to Hurricane Irene, Tropical Storm Lee, the 2012 derecho, Hurricane Sandy, and the shootings at the Washington Navy Yard. Mr. Wollek holds a bachelor’s degree in emergency health services from The George Washington University and a master’s degree in public administration, with a concentration in homeland security and emergency management, from George Mason University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
×
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×
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×
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×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Frameworks for Protecting Workers and the Public from Inhalation Hazards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26372.
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Individuals in the United States and Americans abroad are exposed to inhalation hazards from a variety of sources, and these hazards can have both short- and long-term adverse effects on health. For example, exposure to wildfire smoke, which contains particulate matter and toxic chemicals, can lead to respiratory problems, increased risk for heart attacks, and other adverse health outcomes. Individuals also may be exposed to airborne infectious agents through aerosol or droplet transmission, and as demonstrated by the COVID-19 pandemic, the individual and public health consequences of these exposures can be severe. Storms, floods, and hurricanes can increase exposure to moisture-driven hazards, such as mold, and to accidental releases from production facilities or transport vehicles that may result in chemical exposures.

The current regulatory system is focused primarily on ensuring access to respiratory protection in occupational settings characterized by well-defined hazards and employer-employee relationships. With this narrow regulatory focus, the respiratory protection needs of the public and many workers are not being met. As climate change increases the incidence and severity of wildfires, hurricanes, floods, infectious disease outbreaks, and other phenomena that impact air quality and human health, it is imperative that the United States ensure that the respiratory protection needs of the public and all workers are met. Recognizing the urgent need to address the gaps in the nation's ability to meet the respiratory protection needs of the public and workers without workplace respiratory protection programs, this report makes recommendations for a framework of responsibilities and authorities that would provide a unified and authoritative source of information and effective oversight for the development, approval, and use of respiratory protection.

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