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Guidebook for Implementing Intelligent Transportation Systems Elements to Improve Airport Traveler Access Information (2012)

Chapter: Chapter 7 - Implications and Suggestions for Further Research

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Page 102
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 7 - Implications and Suggestions for Further Research." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Guidebook for Implementing Intelligent Transportation Systems Elements to Improve Airport Traveler Access Information. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22731.
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Page 102
Page 103
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 7 - Implications and Suggestions for Further Research." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Guidebook for Implementing Intelligent Transportation Systems Elements to Improve Airport Traveler Access Information. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22731.
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Page 103

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102 Implications Based on the research and data collected throughout the course of this project, it is evident that there is significant opportunity to enhance the efficiency, safety, and convenience of the airport traveler access information through the increased use of ITS technologies. The availability of data is not a significant hurdle in the vision of a unified view of traveler information dissemination. In fact, in many cases, the data exists, but other considerations stand in the path of integrating and disseminating the information such as security, institutional coordination issues, time and money to build the systems, as well as a lack of understanding of how the system will benefit airport operations and its customers. Integration of both static and real-time information critical to an airport traveler should be a goal of every commercial airport. These information needs exist across the traveler’s entire trip, both as a departing and arriving passenger. Presenting information on road conditions and travel times, roadway incidents, parking location and availability, public transit options and schedule status, alternative mode options, and security and flight information into a consistent and coordinated format will greatly improve the ground access experience for airport travelers. Airports will also need to be prepared to monitor the fast-paced evolution of technology applica- tions and determine how best to adjust their ITS to prevent obsolescence. Confirmed by the survey of travelers, there is already a substantial portion of air travelers who subscribe to airline emails and/or text alerts and who consult online and mobile web sources for information regarding travel to and from the airport. The increased desire of travelers to access real-time information or for technology applications to “push” them all of the information that they need is indicative of the increasing sophistication of the technologies that travelers are using. These and other fast-paced technology shifts are significantly expanding the market for traveler information services. The fundamental trend is that travelers want more information, available across a wider range of applications and devices, which include rich content such as video and graphics. The vision for the future of airport ground access traveler information includes the following key elements: • The use of traditional methods for disseminating traveler information (dynamic message signs, radio, etc.) will remain relevant to a large portion of the population who lack the resources/skills necessary to access the latest technologies. • Use of ITS technologies will increase to effectively present ground access traveler information in a consistent format to airport travelers, regardless of airport size. • Airport websites will provide interactive trip-planning capabilities, including mode choice, pricing information, estimated travel time, and anticipated delay based on time of day. In more C h a p t e r 7 Implications and Suggestions for Further Research

Implications and Suggestions for Further research 103 advanced systems, the trip-planning tool may be linked to real-time flight and ground access conditions. • More traveler information will be pushed to the user via simplified and personalized voice/ email/text message alerts. • Increased implementation of advanced parking management and guidance systems will provide travelers with the location and availability of parking spaces and communicate this information to users via the airport website and/or voice/email/text alerts. • Increased coordination with area 511 systems will provide ground access traveler information to airport travelers that is integrated with the freeway/arterial ITS. • Integration of airport systems with department of transportation systems will increase, providing center-to-center communications for the exchange of traveler information between the two agencies. • There will be greater third-party participation and innovation in data collection, aggregation, and dissemination. Suggestions for Further Research The following questions may be used to scope future research to provide airport operators with additional data on the benefits of deploying ITS technologies in the airport environment: • How does an airport traveler’s threshold for delay differ from other travelers using the same multimodal transportation system? • What are the real-world benefits and associated challenges of integrating airport traveler information with traditional highway traveler information systems? This research would involve development of case studies. • Is it feasible for airports to adopt use of ITS standards? Explore the use of communications and device interoperability standards for the airport environment that would allow for seamless integration with highway ITS. • How is distracted driving legislation ultimately going to affect the way that real-time information is disseminated to travelers? • How will connected vehicle technology, and more specifically, dynamic mobility applications that will take advantage of vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure connectivity, impact the way that travelers access information on mode choice, vehicle routing, and travel times?

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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 70: Guidebook for Implementing Intelligent Transportation Systems Elements to Improve Airport Traveler Access Information provides descriptions, component details, and examples of how airport ground access information can be disseminated using various intelligent transportation systems (ITS) technologies.

The guidebook contains tables to help airport operators determine the applicability of certain ITS strategies based on airport operational needs and airport size.

The printed version of the report includes an interactive CD-ROM designed to help explore and evaluate the information needs of various airport traveler market segments and to identify ITS technologies that best meet the needs of the airport user.

The CD-ROM also contains a decision support tool that allows users to identify appropriate methods of delivering airport traveler information based on the airport traveler market segment.

The CD-ROM is also available for download from TRB’s website as an ISO image. Links to the ISO image and instructions for burning a CD-ROM from an ISO image are provided below.

Help on Burning an .ISO CD-ROM Image

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(Warning: This is a large file and may take some time to download using a high-speed connection.)

CD-ROM Disclaimer - This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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